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SwaTfipscott 

Massac/iusetts 



>> 

I 




2002 



J552 J5O 

JAnnuaCTbwn ^Report 

January 1, 2001 - June 30, 2002 



The cover is a view of the intersection of Orient Street (Puritan Road) and Ross Road, 
Swampscott, in 1856. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTIETH 

ANNUAL REPORT 
OF THE TOWN OFFICERS 



SWAMPSCOTT 
MASSACHUSETTS 



For the period January 1, 2001 through June 30, 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreport2001swani 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Svvampscott was incorporated as a Town on May 21, 1852 



Situated: 
Population: 

Area: 

Assessed Valuation: 
Tax Rate: 



Forms of Government: 



Governing Town Body: 



Governor: 

Attorney General: 

Secretary of the Commonwealtli: 

State Legislative Body: 



United States Congress: 



Representative in Congress: 
Member of Governor's Counci 
Qualifications of voters: 



Registration: 
Where to Vote: 

Tax Bills: 



About 15 miles northeast of Boston 

State Census 2000, 14,412. Persons of all ages taken 

every year in Town Census. 

3.05 square miles 

1,880,507,442 

$13.13 Residential and Open Space 
$23.56 Commercial and Industrial 
$23.56 Personal 
Representative Town Meeting 

(Accepted May 17, 1927. First meeting held February 
27. 1928) 

Board of Selectmen 

Elihu Thomson Administration Building 

22 Monument Avenue 

Acting Governor Jane Swift 

Thomas F. Reilly 

William F. Calvin 

Representing Swampscott: 

Senator Thomas Magee of Lynn (1^' Essex District) 

Representative Douglas W. Petersen (8'^ Essex District) 

Is the Representative in the General Court 

Massachusetts Representatives: 

Senator Edward M. Kennedy 

Senator John F. Kerry 

John Tierney (6'^ Congressional District) 

Patricia Dowling of Lawrence (5"" District) 

Must be 18 years of age, born in the United States or 

Fully naturalized in accordance with the provisions in 

Chapter 587, Acts of 1972 and Chapter 853. Acts of 

1973, there is no duration residential requirement for 

"who is a resident in the city or town where he claims 

the right to vote at the time he registers" may be 

registered. 

Monday through Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Friday 8:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. These hours are subject 
to change. Special sessions held preceding elections. 
Precinct 1 & 2 - Clarke School on Norfolk Avenue side 
adjoining park. 

Precinct 3 & 4 - First Church on Monument Avenue. 
Precinct 5 & 6 - High School on Forest Avenue 
Property taxes are assessed on a fiscal year basis which 
begins July 1*' and ends June 30'^ Payments are due 
quarterly on August 1*', November 1*', February 1*' and 
May 1^'. Interest is assessed after due dates at the rate 
of 14 percent per annum computed per day. 



3 



TOWN OFFICERS - 2002 
ELECTED 



Moderator 

Martin Goldman (2003) 

Board of Selectmen 

Reid J. Cassidy, Chair (2005) 

Marc R. Paster, Vice Chair (2005) 

Paul E. Levenson (2004) 

Daniel R Santanello (2004) 
Carole B, Shutzer, (Chair 2001) (2003) 

Board of Assessors 

Neil Sheehan, Chair (2004) 

Vera C. Harrington (2005) 

John V. Phelan. Ill (2003) 

School Committee 

Kevin F. Breen, Chair (2003) 

Mary DeChillo, Vice Chair (2004) 

Arthur Goldberg (2004) 

Shelley Sackett (2005) 

Dan Yaeger (2005) 

Trustees of the Public Library 

Kelly Raskauskas, Chair (2003) 

Cynthia Zeman, Vice Chair (2004) 

Carl Reardon (2005) 

Board of Health 

Nelson Kessler, Chair (2003) 

Martha Pitman, MD (2005) 

Lawrence Block, MD (2004) 



Constables 

Paul Minsky (2004) 

Carl Reardon (2004) 

Stephen Simmons (2004 

Planning Board 

Eugene Barden, Chair (2003) 

Jeffrey Blonder (2007) 

Veeder C. Nellis (2006) 

John V Phelan, III (2005) 

Richard T. Mcintosh (2004) 

Housing Authority 

James L. Hughes, Chair (2004) 

Patncia Knppendorf (2003) 

Barbara Eldridge (2005) 

Albert DiLisio (2006) 



Marianne Marino McGrath 
State Appointed 



4 



Executive Secretary to the 
Board of Selectmen 

Patricia E. George 

Administrative Assistant 

Nancy A. Lord (Part time) 

Town Accountant 

David Castellarin 

Animal Control Officer 

Claudia Siniawski 

Clerk/Collector/Treasurer 

Jack L. Paster 

Computer Analyst 
Payroll Supervisor 

Denise Dembkoski 

Inspector of Buildings 
& Inspector of Smoke 

Richard Mcintosh (Interim) 



Alternate Inspector of Buildings 

Kathleen Magee (2002) 
Richard T. Mcintosh (2002) 



Director of Emergency 
Management 

Bruce Gordon 



APPOINTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
(Appointments made through 6/30/02) 
Fence Viev^ers 

Reid J. Cassidy 
Richard Mcintosh (Interim) 
Silvio Baruzzi 



(2003) 
(2002) 
(2003) 
(2002) 
(2004) 

(2002) 



(2002) 



Constables to Post Warrants & 
Other Similar Work 

Paul Minsky (2002) 

Constables for Serving 
Civil Process 

Junior Clark (2004) 
David H Janes (2004) 
Ronald DePaolo (2004) 

Town Counsel 

Leonard Kopelman, Esquire (2002) 
Forest Warden 

Laurence J. Galante (2002) 

Senior Building Custodian 

Bnan Cawley (2002) 

Junior Custodian 

John J. Gliha (2002) 



(2002) 
(2002) 



Harbormaster 

Lawrence P. Bithell 
Permanent Appt. 7/1/98 

Assistant Harbormasters 

John T. Cawley 
William F Hennessey 
Roger P Bruley 
Roger Carroll 

Parking Agent 

Kevin Bolduc 

Keeper of the Lockup 

Ronald J. Madigan 

Shellfish Constable 

Lawrence P. Bithell 

Assistant Shellfish Constables 

Joseph C. Cardillo 
John T. Cawley 

Veterans' Service Agent 

Hugh J. Schultz 

Assistant Veterans' Agent 

Steven DeFelice 

Weight & Measures Inspector 

John F. O'Hare 
State Appointed 

Wire Inspector 

Daniel C. Cahill 

Assistant Wire Inspector 

Gordon Lyons 
Ronald Marks 

Burial Agent 

Hugh J. Schultz 

Graves Officer 

John DiPietro 



(2002) 
(2002) 
(2002) 
(2002) 



(2002) 
(2002) 
(2002) 



(2002) 
(2002) 



(2002) 
(2002) 



(2002) 



(2002) 
(2002) 



(2002) 
(2002) 



COMMITTEES APPOINTED BY THE SELECTMEN 





(Appointments made through 6/30/02) 




ADA Oversight Committee 




Design Selection Committee 




Robert DiLisio 




John V Phelan III 


(2002) 


Carole B Shutzer 


(2002) 


Louis Modini 


(2002) 


Patricia George 


(2002) 


John M. Colletti 


(2002) 


Affirmative Action Committee 




Earth Removal Advisory Committee 




Reid J uassidy 


(2002) 


Eugene Barden, Chair 


(2002) 






John Dube 


(2005) 


Council on Aging 




Frances Speranza 


(2005) 


Mary Abramson, Chair 


(2004) 


David Janes 


(2005) 


Estelle tpstein 


(2003) 


Nelson Kessler 


(2002) 


Mary Elizabeth Cobbett 


(2004) 


Joseph Crimmins 


(2002) 


Felice Litman 


(2002) 


Dan Dandreo 


(2002) 


Susan Fisher 


(2002) 


Chief Laurence Galante 


(2002) 


Bea Breitstein 


(2002) 


Milton Fistel 


(2002) 


Marion Stone 


(2002) 


Associate Members 




Walter Newhall 


(2002) 


Brian Murphy 


(2002 






Maureen Cullinane 


(2002) 


Zoning Board of Appeals 




Nicholas Menino 


(2002) 


Kenneth B. Shutzer, Chair 


(2006) 






Robert Baker 


(2005) 


Board of Election Commissioners 




Joseph MacDonald 


(2002) 


Linda J. Thompson, Chair 


(2002) 


David Janes 


(2004) 


Joseph C. Sinatra 


(2002) 


Anthony Scibelli 


(2003) 


Barbara Devereaux 


(2005) 


Associate Members 




Edward Golden 


(2004) 


Michael Gorenstein 


(2002) 






Edward Breed 


(2003) 


Harbor Advisory Committee 








William F. Hennessey, Chair 


(2002) 


Conservation Commission 




Lawrence P Bithell 


(2002) 


Nelson Kessler, Chair 


(2003) 


John O'Shea 


(2002) 


Geralyn P.M. l-alco 


(2003) 


Michael Gambale 


(2002) 


Mark Mahoney 


(2004) 


Peter C. McCarriston 


(2002) 


Joseph Crimmins, Esq. 


(2004) 


Geralyn P.M. Faico 


(2002) 


Carol Epstein, MD 


(2002) 






Peter Vasilou 


(2003) 


Historical Commission 




Tom Ruskin 


(2004) 


Sylvia Belkin, Chair 


/o oo o \ 

(2003) 


Associate Members 




Douglas Maitland 


/on AO \ 
(zUUz) 


Gary Barden 




Mary Doane Cassidy 


/ O A A >l \ 

(2004) 


Antigone Simmons, Esq. 




Jean Reardon 


/O A A O \ 

(2003) 






Brian Best 


/OA AO \ 

(2002) 


Cultural Council 




Sheila Leahy 


/O A AO \ 

(2003) 


r" _ _ - I.I- 

Fran Golden 


(2002) 


Louis Gallo 


/ O A A A \ 

(2000) 


Cynthia Zeman 


(2002) 


Associate Members 




Ellen M Keardon 


(2002) 


Jack Butterworth 


/O A AO \ 


Elm bpring 


(2002) 






Maryann Reynolds 


(2002) 


Insurance Advisory Committee 




Sarah Hitchcock 


(2002) 


Michael Cassidy 


/O A AO \ 

(2002) 






Andrew Roberts 


(2002) 



6 



COMMITTEES APPOINTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
(Appointments made through 6/30/02) 



Board of Public Works 

Robert DiLisio 
Robert Jaeger 
Lawrence Picariello 

Rails to Trails Committee 

William DiMento, Esq 
Sgt William Waters 
David Whelan, Jr. 
JoAnn Simons 
Margaret Barmack, Esq. 

Recreation Commission 

Andrew B Holmes, Chair 
Eve Gambale 
John Hughes 
Paul Gorman 

Leslie Kiely, Member at Large 
Dave Whelan 

Revitalization Committee 

Silvio Baruzzi 
Marc Paster 
Jean Reardon 
Deborah Shelkin Remis 
Peter McNerney 
Brian Watson 
Kenneth Shutzer 
John Phelan 
Larry Scagglione 
Geralyn Faico 
Richard Smith 



(2002) 
(2002) 
(2002) 



(2003) 
(2003) 
(2003) 
(2003) 
(2003) 



(2002) 
(2003) 
(2004) 
(2004) 
(2002) 
(2004) 



Traffic Study Committee 

Sid Novak, Chair (2002) 

Mersine Hennessey, Treasurer (2002) 

Sgt. John Behen (2002) 

Louise LaConte (2002) 

Jeremiah Murphy (2002) 

Veterans' Affairs Committee 

Hugh J. Schultz (2002) 

John Stinson (2002) 

John DiPietro (2002) 

Jay Philpott (2002) 

Michael Pizzi (2002) 

William Wollerscheid (2002) 

Steven DeFelice (2002) 

War Memorial Scholarship Fund 
Committee 

Joseph J. Balsama, Chair (2004) 

Hugh J. Schultz, Ex-Officio (2004) 

Thomas B. White, Jr. (2004) 

Eileen Ventresca, Secretary (2002) 

Angelo Losano (2002) 

Paul E. Garland (2004) 

James H. Lilly (2004) 

Ida S. Pinto (2004) 

Jean F. Reardon (2004) 



Sailing Subcommittee 

Agatha Morrell 



(2002) 



Safety/Security Committee 

Laurence Galante 
Ronald Madigan 

Technology Committee 

Denise Dembkoski 
Herb Belkin 
Gene Nigrelli 
Peter McNerney 
Tom Reid 
Neila Straub 
Robert Villanueva 



(2002) 
(2002) 



(2005) 
(2005) 
(2005) 
(2005) 
(2005) 
(2005) 
(2005) 



7 



REPRESENTATIVES, LIAISONS, DESIGNEES, COORDINATORS 



Clean Air & Oil Spill Coordinator 

Silvio Baruzzi 

Hazardous Waste Coordinator 

James Marotta 

Labor Service Coordinator 

1 Vacancy 

Massachusetts Bay Transportation 
Authority 

Joseph J. Balsama 

Massachusetts Water Resources 
Authority 

Silvio Baruzzi 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

Brian Watson 



North Shore Task Force 

Brian Watson 

National Organization on Disability 
Liaison & Handicap Coordinator 

1 Vacancy 

Right to Know La\N Coordinator 

Brian Cav\/ley 

Massachusetts Bays Program-2000 
Representatives 

Geralyn P.M. Faico 

North Shore Regional Vocational 
School District Representative 

Mary Marrs 

Winter Planning Coordinator 

Silvio Baruzzi 



8 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 



Capital Improvement Study Committee 

Dana Anderson, Chair 
Mounzer Aylouche 
Jack Fischer 
Nelson Kessler 
Lawrence Picariello 



Finance Committee 

Cynthia Merkle, Chair (2004) 

Mary Regan Marrs (2003) 

David Bowen (2002) 

Robert Jolly (2002) 

Cynthia McNerney (2004) 

Joseph Markarian (2003) 

Scott Burke (2003) 



Town Land Use Trustees 

Marianne McGrath 
Peter Shribman 
Joseph Balsama 
Gerald Kaloust 

Zoning By-Law Review Committee 

Robert Baker, Chair 
Scott Burke 
Kenneth Shutzer 
Eugene Barden 
Kathleen Magee 

Ann Whittemore, non-voting member 



9 



APPOINTED BY THE SELECTMEN AND MODERATOR 
Personnel Board 

Gene Nigrelli, Chair - (2003)) 

Mike Tumulty - (2003) 
Peter C. McCarriston - (2004) 
David Van Dam - (2002) 

Town Administrator Search Committee 

Janet Baker, Chair 
Charles Baker 
Adam Forman 
Robert Baker 
Ina Lee Block 

APPOINTED BY THE MASS. EMERGENCY RESPONSE COMMISSION 
Emergency Planning Committee 

Reid J. Cassidy, Chair, Board of Selectmen 
Ronald J. Madigan, Chief, Police Department 
Laurence J. Galante, Chief, Fire Department 
Nelson Kessler, Chairman, Conservation Commission 
Bruce Gordon, Emergency Management Director 
Silvio Baruzzi, Superintendent, Public Works 
James Marotta, Health Director 

APPOINTED BY PROBATE COURT 
Roland Jackson Medical Scholarship Committee 

Reverend Dean Pederson 
Dr. Brian Coughlin 
Dr. Peter M. Barker 

APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 
Health Officer - James Marotta 

Recycling Committee 

Nelson Kessler, Chair 
Martha Pitman, MD 
Michael Bergman, MD 
Barbara Jaslow-Schaefer 
Smilia Marvosh 
Agnes Raymond 
Geralyn Faico 
Roy Pearson 
Bette Weiss 
Alice Winston 
Robert Murphy 

APPOINTED BY THE INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 
Gas & Plumbing Inspector - Peter T. McCarriston 
Assistant Inspector - Michael Waldman 



10 



APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Superintendent of Public Works & Town Engineer - Silvio J Baruzzi 

APPOINTED BY THE CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT BOARD AND SELECTMEN 
AND ELECTED BY THE TOWN EMPLOYEES 
Contributory Retirement Board 

John Kiely, Jr., Chair - appointed by the Retirement Board - (2003) 
Thomas H. Driscolt, Jr. -appointed by the Board of Selectmen - (2002) 
John Behen, Employee Representative - (2002) 
Christopher Thomson, Employee Representative - (2004) 
David Castellarin, Ex-Officio, Town Accountant 

APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER WITH APPROVAL OF BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Assistant Treasurer - Barbara Bickford 

APPOINTED BY THE TOWN CLERK / COLLECTOR WITH APPROVAL OF BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Assistant Town Clerk - Brenda Corso 
Assistant Town Clerk - Marsha Willis 
To receive Notice of Intention of Marriage and to administer the Oath of Office to 
persons appointed or elected to boards, committees & commissions within the Town of Swampscott 

APPOINTED OR ELECTED BY ORGANIZATIONS 
OF THE EMPLOYEES AFFECTED 
Group Insurance Advisory Committee 

Timothy Cassidy, Police Department Representative 
James Snow, Fire Department Representative 
Dorothy Forman & Maureen McCarthy, Library Representatives 
Judy Kenney, School Representative 
Sheryl Levenson, Town Hall Representative 
Gene Nigrelli, Non - Union Employee Representative 
Carl Reardon, Department of Public Works & Custodians Representatives 

Union Presidents 

Police Department - Timothy Cassidy 
Fire Department - James Snow 
Library - Dorothy Forman & Izzy Abrahms 
Teachers - Judy Kenney 
School Custodians & Cafeteria Workers - Carl Reardon 
School Secretaries - Nancy Olson (at High School) 
Public Works - Carl Reardon (at High School) 
Town Hall Clencal - Carl Reardon 



11 



APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Advisory Committee on School Renovation & Construction 

Paul E. Levenson, Esquire, Co-Chair 
Kevin F. Breen, Co-Chair 
Buck Weaver 
Bob Donelan 
Jack Burke 
Joseph Markarian, Jr. 
Howard Vatcher 
Michael Vizzone 
Susan Spano 
Marcus Buckley 

Martin Plum 
Michael Devlin 
Nelson Kessler 
Kevin Gookin 
Veeder Nellis 
Phyllis Ruscitti 
Cindy Merkle 
Ann Woodfork 



12 



DEMOCRATIC TOWN COMMITTEE 



OFFICERS 



Somer, Margaret A. (Chair) 




32 Bay View Ave. 


Blonder, Jeffrey(Vice-Chair) 




15 Shackle Way 


Marrs, Mary Regan(Clerk) 




12 Capstan Way 


Patrikis, Ted(Treasurer) 


REGULAR MEMBERS 


1006 Paradise Rd. BIdg N2J 


Cassidy, Reid 




24 Crosman Ave. 


Devereaux, Barbara 




9 Humphrey Ter. 


DiPesa, Ralph "Skip" 




67 Aspen Rd. 


Driscoll, Thomas 




12 Banks Ter. 


Feldman, Doris 




18 Shepard Ave. 


Godley, Sophie 




20 Hampshire St. 


Golden, Ed 




47 Farragut Rd. 


Golden, Fran 




47 Farragut Rd. 


Kaufman, Nancy 




28 Devens Rd. 


Kearney, Sheila 




14 Shackle Way 


Maloney, John 




9 Humphrey Ter. 


Mauriello, Chris 




55 Blaney St. 


Mulgay, Mark 




87 Pine St. 


Munnelly, Dan 




8 Sampson Ave. 


Paster, Marc 




6 Brown Rd. 


Phelan, John 




75 Banks Rd. 


Richmond, David 




6 Swampscott Ave. 


Rosenthal, Burt 




69 Ocean View Rd. 


Shanahan, Bill 




48 King St. 


Simmons, Antigone 




487 Humphrey St. 


Smith, Jim 




51 Harrison Ave. 


Watson, Brian 




50 Greenwood Ave. 


Whelton, Linda Bendel 




1006 Paradise Rd. 


Wheiton, Peter 




1006 Paradise Rd. 


Young, Gary 




1006 Paradise Rd. 


Young, Mona 


LIFETIME MEMBERS 


1006 Paradise Rd. 


Baker, Edyth 




75 Stanley Rd. 


Baker, Robert 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 


75 Stanley Rd. 


Diamant, Dan 




63 Aspen Rd. 


DiPesa, Cheryl 




67 Aspen Rd. 


Feinberg, Richard 




12 Bradlee Ave. 


Kalman, Ed 




49 Ocean View Rd. 


Petersen, Rep. Douglas 




29 Rose Ave., Marblehead 


Smullin, Alix 




22 Woodbine Ave. 


Weiss, Gerdy 




101 Bay View Dr. 


Whalen, Barbara 




1 1 Deer Cove Rd. 



13 



REPUBLICAN TOWN COMMITTEE 



REGULAR MEMBERS 

Budreau. William 
Butters, Joy 
Butters, John 
Butters, Bryan 
Chesley, Bruce 
Cross, David 
Collins, Henry J. 
Hall, Jeanne 
Leger, Michael 
McGrath, Kevin 
McGrath, Marianne 
Minsky, Paul 
Mizioch, Lauren 
Palleschi, Arthur 
Palleschi, Edv\/ard 
Perry, Frank Sr. 
Perry, Frank, Jr. 
Perry, Frank III 
Perry, Marilyn 
Perry, Robert - Chair 
Sinatra, Joseph 
Sinatra, Beverly 
Taubert, Alan 
Tennant, Alexander 
Tennant, Cynthia 
Thompson, Anneliese 
Thompson, Glen 
Thompson, Linda 
Thompson, John Jr. 
Thompson, Susan 
Williams, Tracy 
Withrow, Robert 
Withrow, Mary Susan 
Wood, Mike 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

Bargoot, Joyce 
Barr, Sam 
Mancini, Francis A. 
Paster, Jack 
Warnock, Donald Jr. 



20 Mostyn St. 
53 Pleasant St. 
53 Pleasant St. 
53 Pleasant St. 

6 Nev\/ Ocean St. 
110 Norfolk Ave. 
8 Duke St. 

61 Greenwood Ave. 
58 Redington St. 
258 Essex Street 
258 Essex Street 
P.O. Box 106 

7 Foster Road 
Banks Circle 

24 Columbia Street 
319 Paradise Road 
71 Roy Street 
71 Roy Street 
6 MacArthur Circle 

6 MacArthur Circle 

62 Rockland Street 
62 Rockland Street 
442 Humphrey Street 
130 Atlantic Avenue 
130 Atlantic Avenue 
10 Burpee Road 

10 Burpee Road 
80 Middlesex Avenue 
80 Middlesex Avenue 
80 Middlesex Avenue 

7 Blaney Circle 

27 Greenwood Terrace 
27 Greenwood Terrace 
31 Cedar Hill Terrace 

16 Plummer Avenue 
53 Bay View Drive 
76 Ocean View Road 
20 Hampden Street 
55 Berkshire Street 



14 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



The Board of Selectmen has had an eventful, challenging and memorable eighteen 
months addressing the many issues that have come before it. The Board has had the pnvilege to 
witness and be a part of history in the making. The following is a summary of the many events 
that have unfolded throughout the past year and a half. 

In January 2001, the Board appointed Knstina Scarponi to the position of 
Interdepartmental Assistant. Ms. Scarponi has proven to be a most valuable asset providing 
clencal support to numerous offices such as the Building Department, Fire Department, 
Accounting Office, Recreation Office, Election Office, Board of Health and the Selectmen's Office. 
The Board is grateful to Ms. Scarponi for her diligence and willingness to assist the many offices 
during periods of excess workload and/or covering vacations. 

The past eighteen months marked a new era in computer technology for the Town. With 
the creation of a Technology Committee and the Assistance of the Computer Analyst, Denise 
Dembkoski, all departments in the Town were equipped with Internet and e-mail capabilities. To 
insure the proper use of these tools, the Board of Selectmen adopted a World Wide Web and e- 
mail policy for the Town. Having access to e-mail and the Internet has proven to be most helpful 
for communication amongst departments as well as with residents. 

The long awaited Vinnin Square traffic improvement project finally began in the spring of 
2001 and was completed in the summer of 2002. The finished product is one we can all be proud 
of. The installation of additional traffic lights as well as updates to existing traffic lights and the 
widening of roadways have dramatically increased the safety for motonsts and pedestrians alike 
traveling through the Vinnin Square area. The Board would like to commend Selectman 
Santanello for his persistence with this project and for continually keeping the residents and 
Board members updated on the project's progress. 

In May 2001, the Board said farewell to long time friend and Police Chief John E. 
Toomey. The Board extends its sincere thanks to Chief Toomey for his many years of dedicated 
professional service to the Town and wishes him well in his retirement and future endeavors. The 
Townspeople will sorely miss Chief Toomey. The Board appointed Captain Ronald Madigan as 
Acting Police Chief until his permanent appointment in August. Chief Madigan became the 15'^ 
Chief of Police for the Town of Swampscott. The Board is confident of Ron's qualifications and 
knows he will be an excellent Chief. 

With the fear of budget cuts and the probability of lay-offs within the major departments, 
the Board of Selectmen turned to the voters for assistance and called for a Special Election on 
June 19, 2001, to override proposition 2/4. The ballot question was passed allowing the Town to 
assess an additional $2,469,790 in real and personal property taxes for the purpose of 
supplementing the fiscal year 2002 budget. This was the first time in many years that the Town 
had asked for an override and is thankful to the 41% of voters who went to the polls to cast their 
votes in support of the Town. 

May 21, 2002, marked the 150'^ anniversary of the Town of Swampscott's incorporation. 
The 150"^ Celebration Committee planned an array of Town wide events from May through July to 
commemorate the Town's inception. Activities included a "Birthday" party, golf tournament at 
Tedesco Country Club, pancake breakfast festival, gigantic parade, family day at Phillips Park, 
trolley tours, garden tour, public safety day, pops concert, fireworks, firecracker road race, an old 
fashioned baseball game, "Beatle Juice" concert and concluding banquet at the Sheraton 
Ferncroft. On behalf of the Town, the Board would like to extend its appreciation to the 150"^ 
Committee for the grand schedule of events. 

In response to the Financial Management Review prepared by the Massachusetts 
Department of Revenue Municipal Data Management and Technical Assistance Bureau, Town 
Meeting petitioned the Commonwealth to make amendments to the existing Town Charter. 
Among other things, the Charter change proposed the creation of a Town Administrator, changing 
the Clerk/Collector/Treasurer position from elected to appointed and changing the Board of Public 
Works from an elected board to an appointed board. On January 2002, Acting Governor Jane 
Swift approved the proposed Charter amendments and an election was held on March 26, 2002, 
for a vote of the people. This election was scheduled on the same day as the Special State 
Primary. This was the first time in the history of the Town of Swampscott that two elections were 



15 



held on the same day. The proposed Charter changes were approved by the voters and thus 
began the transitional period. A Town Administrator Search Committee was created following the 
provisions set forth in Chapter 10, section 10-1 of the amended Town Charter. The Board of 
Selectmen eagerly awaits the Search Committee's recommendations for Town Administrator and 
anticipates the Charter changes will provide the Town with accountability. 

The "Senior Work Off' abatement program, which was accepted by Town Meeting in 
2000, continues to be a success. The program allows eligible seniors an opportunity to volunteer 
their services in an exchange for an abatement on their taxes. The maximum participants 
allowed in the program are twenty. As of January 2002, over twenty seniors had applied for the 
program. Eligible seniors are accepted on a first come first served basis and are encouraged to 
submit completed applications the second week in December for the upcoming year. 

The Board continues to work with the various departments seeking applicable grant 
monies for historical and restoration projects, equipment purchases and other community 
improvements. 

In the wake of the September 1l"^ attacks on America, the Town remains a strong "No 
Place For Hate" community. Several "No Place For Hate" activities were planned during the past 
eighteen months including, but not limited to, artwork displays, featured speakers, interfaith 
services and poetry contests. The Board maintains its proclamation that the Town of Swampscott 
will not tolerate hate crimes and will continue in its efforts to promote and encourage diversity 
amongst its citizens. 

The Board would like to take this opportunity to express its appreciation to all those 
individuals who have taken time away from their families and friends to serve on the many 
committees, commissions and boards. The Board is grateful for the wide array of knowledge and 
skill that each individual brings to these committees providing a positive future for the Town. 
The Board would like to applaud Executive Secretary, Patricia E. George, Administrative 
Assistant, Nancy A. Lord and Interdepartmental Assistant, Kristina Scarponi for their continued 
commitment to the Town and assistance to the Board. 

It is both an honor and privilege to serve the Town as members of the Board of 
Selectmen and we appreciate the opportunity you have given to each of us to do so. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Reid J, Cassidy, Chair 

Marc R. Paster, Vice Chair 

Paul E. Levenson 

Daniel R. Santanello 

Carole B. Shutzer (Chair - 2001 ) 



16 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

TO THE 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

From January, 2001 to July, 2002, many opportunities were seized to develop, expand or 
enhance policies and procedures on many levels of town government. 

The Personnel Board developed a new hiring policy which included for the first time an interview 
committee composed of the Executive Secretary, Department Head or Board Chair and a member of the 
Personnel Board and a thorough background examination prior to the committee's recommendations to 
the Board of Selectmen for appointment. I had the pleasure of serving on the committee which hired 
several clerical employees and a Public Works crew member via this process. 

The duties of the Interdepartmental Assistant or "Floater" were expanded to include part-time 
clerical support to the Fire Department in addition to the areas already receiving assistance which 
include, but are not limited to, the offices of Selectmen, Accounting, Elections, Recreation and vacation, 
sick and personal leave coverage for most offices at Town Hall. 

Communications between departments were enhanced through the expansion of the existing 
Department Heads Committee to include weekly written and verbal reports from individual Department 
Heads appointed by the Board of Selectmen. This gives us the opportunity to explore the individual's 
interests, suggestions and recommendations as well as address his or her concerns. The supportive 
and cooperative spirit of our Department Heads enabled them to successfully deal with some difficult 
moments in the past year and one half — the possibility of severe budget cuts without a Proposition 2/4 
Override and Emergency Management Preparedness issues as a result of the events of September 11, 
2001 . They also worked diligently with the Board of Selectmen on union bargaining matters. 

It is always a challenge to research the most cost effective and efficient methods of conducting 
town business. This year we are working with Bay State Consultants as they examine options for the 
purchase of municipal energy and the potential cost savings associated with the purchase of our 
streetlights. 

Computer Analyst Denise Dembkoski and I successfully completed the Massachusetts Inspector 
General's Procurement Training. We are expecting to be certified as Procurement Officers sometime in 
October, 2002. 

A vote of the 2002 Annual Town Meeting, upon the recommendation of the Personnel Board, 
reclassified the position of Executive Secretary to the Board of Selectmen to the position of Personnel 
Director The transition from Executive Secretary to Personnel Director will take place upon the 
appointment of a Town Administrator. 

I sincerely appreciate the support of our Board of Selectmen, our dedicated Department Heads, 
Administrative Assistant Nancy Lord and Interdepartmental Assistant Kristina Scarponi. They have made 
my experience as Executive Secretary both productive and enjoyable. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Patricia E. George 

Executive Secretary to the Board of Selectmen 



17 



CLERK OF SWAMPSCOTT 
JACK L. PASTER 



OFFICIAL TOWN STATISTICS - 1/1/2001 TO 6/30/2002 

Marriage Intentions Filed / Marriage Licenses Issued: 73 
Marriages Recorded: 73 
Births Recorded: 185 (98, females; 87, males) 
Deaths Recorded: 238 (138, females; 100, males) 

Applications for Variances and Special Permits processed: 81 
Oath of Office Administered to Town Officials: 166 
Massachusetts wetlands Protect Act/ 
Commission Commission filings processed: 
Conflict of Interest Statements recorded/processed: 12 
Resignations of Town Officials accepted and processed: 6 
Applications for Planning Board action processed: 7 
Site Plan Review Applications processed: 63 
Earth Removal Applications processed: 2 
Public Meeting Notices recorded and posted: 359 
Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) Filings processed: 71 
Certificates of Business (DBA) issued and processed: 229 
Gas Storage (Flammables) Renewal Permits issued: 32 
Raffle/Bazaar Permits issued: 
Dog Licenses issued: 1,792 

NOTE: 

By vote of Town Meeting, the annual report of all municipal departments now 
covers the fiscal year, July 1 to June 30. Since many local, state and federal 
agencies require statistics for birth, death and marriage to be on a calendar 
year basis, January 1 to December 31 , we herewith present the last three calendar 
years to maintain the historical integrity and usefulness of this report: 

1999 - Births, 183; deaths, 186; marriages 66. 

2000 - Births, 176; deaths, 193; marriages 56. 

2001 - Births, 139; deaths, 90; marriages 58. 



18 



The Town of Swampscott 
Town Warrant 
April 2001 



SS. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott 
GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in elections and Town affairs to vote at: 



Precinct One 



Clarke School 



Norfolk Avenue 



Precinct Two 



Clarke School 



Norfolk Avenue 



Precinct Three 



Precinct Four 



Precinct Five 



Precinct Six 



First Church in Swampscott, Monument Avenue 
Congregational 

First Church in Swampscott, Monument Avenue 
Congregational 

Swampscott High School Forest Avenue 
Swampscott High School Forest Avenue 



on Tuesday, the twenty-fourth day of April, 2001. from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following 
purpose: 

To choose a moderator for one (1) year 

To choose two (2) members of the Board of Selectmen for three (3) years 
To choose one Treasurer for three (3) years 

To choose one (1) member for the Board of Assessors for three (3) years 

To choose one (1) member of the Board of Public Works for three (3) years 

To choose two (2) members for the School Committee for three (3) years 

To choose one (1 ) member for the Trustees of the Public Library for three (3) years 

To choose one (1) member for the Planning Board for five (5) years 

To choose one (1) member for the Housing Authority for five (5) years 

To choose one ( 1 ) member of the Housing Authority for two (2) years 

To choose three (3) members for Constable for three (3) years 

To choose eighteen (18) Town Meeting Members in each of the six (6) Precincts for three (3) years 

To choose two (2) Town Meeting Members in Precinct One for one (1 ) year 
To choose one (1) Town Meeting Member in Precinct Two for one (1) year 
To choose one (1) Town Meeting Member in Precinct Three for one (1) year 
To choose three (3) Town Meeting Members in Precinct Four for two (2) years 



19 



To choose two (2) Town Meeting Members in Precinct Six for one (1) year 
To choose one (1) Town Meeting Member in Precinct Six for two (2) years 

At the close of the election, the meeting will adjourn to Monday, the thirtieth day of April, 
2001. at 7:15 p.m. at Swampscott Middle School on Greenwood Avenue, Swampscott. 

See the report of the Election Commission for the results of the 2001 municipal election. 

2001 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Return of Service: 

Pursuant to the within warrant to be directed, I have notified the inhabitants of the Town of 
Swampscott qualified to vote in elections and in Town affairs by posting an attested copy thereof at 
the Town Administration Building, at the Post Office, and at least two public and conspicuous 
places in each precinct in the town, and at or in the immediate vicinity of the Swampscott Railroad 
Station. Said posting was done on April 17, 2001. and no less than seven (7) days before the date 
appointed for said meeting. 

Attest: Paul Minsky 
Constable of Swampscott 

Mailing of Warrants and Annual Reports: 

The Warrants for the Annual Town Meeting were mailed to Town Meeting members and to 
those who were running for a Town Meeting seat (listed on the ballot) on April 12. 2001. Copies of 
the Annual Report for the year ending December 31. 2000 were also mailed on April 12. 2001 in 
the same package. Copies of the Warrant and Annual Report were also available, free of charge, 
for any interested person at the Town Administration Building. 

NOTICE OF ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

The Annual Town Meeting of 2001 will convene on Tuesday, April 24. 2001. with Article 
1 (the Town Election) at 7:00 a.m. in the Town's regular polling places. At 8:00 p.m.. the Town 
Meeting will be adjourned until Monday, April 30. 2001, 7:15 p.m.. in the auditorium of the 
Swampscott Middle School on Greenwood Avenue. 

NOTICE OF ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2001, 7:15 P.M. 

To the Town Meeting members: 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article I. Section 2, of the Bylaws of the Town 
of Swampscott that the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting will be held on Monday. April 30. 2001. 
beginning at 7:15 p.m. in the auditorium of the Swampscott Middle School on Greenwood Avenue. 

The required identification badge is to be picked up at the auditorium entrance when you 
check in. 



20 



Meeting certifications: 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of the Annual Town Meeting of 
April 24, 2001, the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting of April 30, 2001 was held at the 
Swampscott Middle School auditorium on Greenwood Avenue and was called to order at 7:22 p.m. 
with the necessary quorum being present (239). At 10:05 p.m. is was voted to adjourn to May 1, 
2001. 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of April 30, 2001. the Adjourned 
Annual Town Meeting of May 1, 2001 was held at the Swampscott Middle School auditorium on 
Greenwood Avenue and was called to order at 7:23 p.m. with the necessary quorum being present 
( 1 9 1 ). At 1 0: 1 p.m. it was voted to adjourn to May 2, 200 1 . 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of May 1 , 2001, the Adjourned 
Annual Town Meeting of May 2, 2001 was held at the Swampscott Middle School auditorium on 
Greenwood Avenue and was called to order at 7:20 p.m. with the necessary quorum being present 
(180). 

I hereby certify that at 9:55 p.m. on May 2, 2001 the Annual Town Meeting of 2001 was 
dissolved. 

Legal Advertisement Published: 

In accordance with the By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott the following legal 
advertisement was published, as indicated, concerning the adjourned sessions of Town Meeting: 

TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
Commonwealth of Massachu,setts 
Office of the Town Clerk 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article II, Section 2 of the By-Laws of the Town 
of Swampscott that the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting will be held on Monday. April 30. 2001 
beginning at 7:15 p.m. in the auditorium of the Swampscott Middle School on Geenwood avenue. 

Martin C. Goldman, moderator of Swampscott, will preside. 

Item Jack L Paster 

4/ 1 7/200 1 Clerk of Swampscott 

Attendance: 

For the 2001 Town Meeting attendance, by precinct, see the list at the end of this report. 

TOWN MEETING ACTION 

Reverend Beth Williams of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Greater Lynn offered the 
invocation. 



21 



The Return of Service was read by Town Clerk Jack L Paster who then administered the Oath of 
Office to the new Town Meeting members. 

Moderator Martin C. Goldman introduced various town officials and then presented Distinguished 
Service Awards to three Swampscott residents who were recognized for their unwavering support 
of Swampscott High School athletic programs and the Town of Swampscott itself The 2001 
recipients included Ann Riddell George Riddell and Joseph "JoJo" Cardillo. Members afforded the 
trio a standing ovation. 

ACTION UNDER THE ARTICLES 

ARTICLE 2. To hear and act on the reports of Town Officials, Boards and Committees. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 2. That the following reports be accepted: 

An essay by Middle School student Helene Phelan on the "No Place to Hate" campaign. 

A report on the DOR financial Management Review from Selectman Carole Shutzer. 

A report on the fourth of July Committee from Peter McNemey. 

A report on the Swampscott Sequesentennial from Moderator Martin Goldman. 

A report on the North Shore Regional Vocational Technical High School from Mary Marrs. 

A report on the Olmstead design in and around the Monument Avenue area and the 
progress of having that area listed in the National Register of Historic Places from Historical 
Committee Chairman Sylvia Belkin. 

A report on the town's Capital Improvement Plan from Committee Chairman Dana 
Anderson. 

A report on the status of the School Department's Master Plan Infrastructure Report from 
School Committee Chairman Kevin Breen and the architectural firm creating the plan. 

MOTIONS (Sense of the Meeting) by Finance Committee Chairman Cynthia Merkle: 

1. It is the sense of this Town Meeting that the Board of Selectmen, without giving up any 
of its obligations to negotiate in good faith in collective bargaining matters, notify the Finance 
Committee of any demands and/or negotiations that may come up during the collective bargaining 
process that could have future financial implications to the town. Any communication from the 
Selectmen to the Finance Committee shall be solely by way of advice and shall not derogate from 
their statutory obligation to negotiate in good faith with the town employees. 

2. It is the sense of this Town Meeting that the Personnel Board should notify the Finance 
Committee of any proposed changes that it is entertaining that could have future financial 
implications to the town. 

3. It is the sense of this Town Meeting that the School Committee, without giving up any of 
its obligations to negotiate in good faith in collective bargaining matters, notify the Finance 
Committee of any demands and/or negotiations that may come up during the collective bargaining 
process that could have future financial implications to the town. Any communication from the 
School Committee to the Finance Committee shall be solely by way of advice and shall not 
derogate from their statutory obligation to negotiate in good faith with the town employees. In 



22 



addition, the School Committee shall notify the Finance Committee of any contemplated salary 
changes with respect to personnel not covered by Collective Bargaining that could have future 
financial implications to the Town. 

4/30/2001. Majority Vote. 

ARTICLE 3. To see what action the Town will take in relation to the salaries of elected 

Town Officials for the ensuing year. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 3. That the Town vote to fix the salary and the compensation of elected officers of 
the Town as provided by section 108 of chapter 41, General Laws as amended for the twelve 
month period beginning July 1, 2001. 

Town Clerk and Collector of Taxes $50, 149 
Treasurer $ 8,1 15 

Constable $ 100 

4/30/2001. Unanimous Vote. 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer unexpended balances as shown on 

the books of the Town Accountant as of June 30, 2000, to the Surplus Revenue Accounts, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 4. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

4/30/2001. Unanimous Vote. 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money, by borrowing 

or otherwise, to the account of unpaid bills for the purpose of settling all bills contracted prior to 
July 1, 2000, and remaining unpaid at the time of the closing of the Town's books for the year 
ending June 30, 2000, according to the records of the Town Accountant, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 
Voted Article 5. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
4/30/2001. Majority Vote. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer funds from various Town accounts 

which have monies remaining therein to such other Town accounts which reflect a deficit, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



23 



Voted Article 6. That the sum of $21,690 be transferred from the items indicated to the Finance 
Committee's Reserve Fund: 

$3,290 from the Finance Committee's 2001 Budget - Secretary 
$10,000 from the 2001 Unclassified - Clerical Budget 
$8,400 from the 2001 Selectmen's Budget - Administration 



ARTICLE 7 To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, by 

borrowing or otherwise, for the following projects, or take any action relative thereto. 

No. Purpose Recommened 

Police Department 

02-01 Computer hardware and software $35,000 

02-02 Police station video security $20,000 

Fire Department 

02-03 Four wheel command vehicle $35,000 

02-04 Generator and building improvements $109,000 

Department of Public Works 

02-05 Booster pumping station at Fosters Dam (1) $50,000 

02-06 Replace variable frequency drives at Humphrey $150,000 

Street pumping station (1) 

02-07 Pave streets $75,000 

02-09 Purchase three equipped trucks with Sanders $100,000 

02-10 Administration Building repair $20,000 

02-1 1 Pave roads in cemetery (2) $30,000 

School Department 

02-1 2 Roof, vent, and gutter replacement at Stanley $1 75,000 
and other schools 

02-1 3 Waterproof and re-point brick phase two Middle $1 00,000 
School 

02-14 Fire proof trailers and rubbish enclosures at all $40,000 
schools 

02-15 Instructional technology $100,000 

02-16 Electrical, plumbing and heating upgrades $100,000 

02-17 Conversion to gas heat and install univents at $100,000 
Machon School 

02-18 Security system at High school $60,000 

2-1 8A Textbook replacement program $43,000 

Recreation Department 

02-19 Tennis court repairs $20,000 



24 



Council on Aging 

02-20 General Repairs 



$32,000 



Total $1,394,000 

(1) Supported by Water User Charges 

(2) Supported by Cemetery User Charges 

Each numbered item to be considered a separate appropriation. The budgeted amount may be 
spent only for the stated purpose. 

Sponsored by the Capital Improvement Committee 

Voted Article 7. That the Town appropriate the sum of $1,394,000 for the purposes specified in 
the Article; further, that the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be 
authorized to borrow this amount through the issuance of bonds or notes under the appropriate 
section of the Massachusetts General Laws, and that the Treasurer be authorized to combine the 
borrowing with any other borrowing authorized by this Town Meeting. 

4/30/2001. Unanimous Vote. 

Motion: That the subject matter of repaving or repairing the Phillips Park parking lot be referred to 
the Capital Improvements Committee for further study. 

5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote appropriate the necessary funds, by borrowing 

or otherwise, for the following projects, or take any action relative thereto. 



No. 


Purpose 


Requested 


Recommend 




Police Department 






02-21 


Dare vehicle 


$30,000 


$0 




Fire Department 






02-22 


Ambulance 


$150,000 


$0 




Department of Public Works 






02-23 


Street Paving 


$79,000 


$0 


02-24 


Fish House Repair 


$100,000 


$0 


02-25 


Administration Building Parking Lot Paving 


$25,000 


$0 


02-26 


Phillips Park Parking Lot Paving 


$25,000 


$0 


02-27 


Ingraham Terrace 


$100,000 


$0 




School Department 






02-28 


Bituminous repairs to school parking lots by 


$100,000 


$0 




P.W. 






02-29 


Bleacher / Gym repairs M. S. 


$25,000 


$0 


02-30 


Suspended ceilings 


$50,000 


$0 


02-31 


Replace doors at all schools & windows at 


$320,000 


$0 




Clarke and Stanley 






02-32 


Furniture 


$50,000 


$0 


02-33 


Exterior/Interior finish upgrades 


$100,000 


$0 


02-34 


Science Lab conversion at High School 


$100,000 


$0 



25 



02-35 Shades at all buildings 

Recreation Department 

02-36 Tennis court repairs 

Library 

02-37 Replacement Palladium 
Windows 

Selectmen 

02-38 Burpee Terrace Drainage 
02-39 Installing Traffic Signal at Burpee 

Total 



$25,000 $0 
$20,000 $0 
$70,000 $0 

$250,000 $0 
$172,500 $0 

$1,791,500 $0 



Each numbered item to be considered a separate appropriation. The budgeted amount may be 
spent only for the state purpose. 

Voted Article 8. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
4/30/2001. Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of the Council on 

Aging Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, said account to be under the direction of the Council on Aging and used for the 
deposit of receipts collected through public donations; and further to allow the Council on Aging to 
expend funds not to exceed $5,000 for fiscal year 2002 from said account for ongoing supplies and 
equipment. This would be contingent upon an annual report from the Council on Aging to the 
Town on the total receipts and expenditures of the Account each fiscal year, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



Voted Article 9. That the Town approve this article. 
5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of the 

Recycling — Blue Bins Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2. of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, said account to be under the direction of the Board of Health and used to receive 
funds from residents purchases; and further to allow the Board of Health to expend funds not to 
exceed $10,000 for fiscal year 2002 from said account for recycling and Board of Health Services. 
This would be contingent upon an annual report from the Board of Health to the Town on the total 
receipts and expenditures of the Account each fiscal year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 10. That the Town approve this article. 

5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 



26 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of the 

Swampscott Municipal Television Access Grant Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 
53E1/2. of the Massachusetts General Laws, said account to be under the direction of the Board of 
Selectmen and used for the deposit of receipts from cable television vendors; and further to allow 
the Board of Selectmen to expend funds not to exceed $6,000 for fiscal year 2002 from said 
account for Municipal Television Access. This would be contingent upon the annual report from 
the Board of Selectmen to the Town on the total receipts and expenditures of the Account each 
fiscal year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 1 1 . That the Town approve this article. 
5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of the 

Swampscott Educational Telecommunication Program Capital Grant Account as authorized by 
Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the Massachusetts General Laws, said account to be under the 
direction of the School Committee and used to receive funds from cable television vendors; and 
further to allow the School Committee to expend funds not to exceed $100,000 for fiscal year 2002 
from said account for educational telecommunications capital items. This would be contingent 
upon an annual report from the School Committee to the Town on the total receipts and 
expenditures of the Account each fiscal year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 12. That the Town approve this article. 
5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of the 

Swampscott Educational Telecommunication Program Account as authorized by Chapter 44, 
Section 53E1/2, of the Massachusetts General Laws, said account to be under the direction of the 
School Committee and used to receive funds from cable television vendors; and further to allow 
the School Committee to expend funds not to exceed $65,000 for fiscal year 2002 from said 
account for educational telecommunications. This would be contingent upon an annual report from 
the School Committee to the Town on the total receipts and expenditures of the Account each fiscal 
year, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 13. That the Town approve this article. 
5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 



27 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the establishment of a SPED 

Medicaid Reimbursement Account as authorized by Chapter 44. Section 53E1/2 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, said account to be under the direction of the School Department and 
used to receive funds from Medicaid reimbursements and further to allow the School Committee to 
expend funds to pay for the work necessary to receive the funds for fiscal year 2002 from said 
account, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 14. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Job Classification and Salary 

Plan of the Personnel Board Bylaws, as it applies to those positions not covered by collective 
bargaining agreements, and appropriate the necessary funds, by borrowing or otherwise, as 
recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Personnel Board 



Position 


FY2002 Salary 


Accountant 


$75,000 


Assistant Town Accountant 


34.000 


Council on Aging - Director 


33.089 


Council on Aging - Outreach worker 


21,115 


Animal Control Officer 


29,850 


Zoning Board of Appeals - Secretary 


2,898 


Assistant Assessor 


58,526 


Benefits Coordinator 


21,500 


Building Inspector 


51,358 


Civil Defense - Director 


1,344 


Computer Analyst 


53.600 


Constable 


100 


Finance Committee - Secretary 


1,000 


Gas Inspector 


2.500 


Harbormaster 


6.567 


Health Department - Nurse 


26,883 


Health Agent 


50,266 


Library - Director 


51,082 


Assistant Library Director 


38,054 


Local Inspector 1.200 


Planning Board - Secretary 


1,000 


Plumbing Inspector 


18.016 


Assistant Plumbing Inspector 


1,298 


Recreation Coordinator 


6,200 


Selectmen - Executive Secretary 


66,950 


Selectmen - Administrative Assistant 


: 23.340 


Veterans Service Agent 


8.947 


Sealer of weights and Measures 


5,971 


Wiring Inspector/Fire alarm Specialist 28,548 



28 



Hourly wage employees: 
Extra Clerical - 

Clerical and Computer Skilled 7.00 - 15.00 

Police Crossing Guards 9.26 

Public Works - Seasonal Employees 9.71 

Recreation Secretary 13.50 

Recreation - Seasonal Employees 6.33 - 10.00 



Voted Article 15. That the Town approve this Article. (There is no appropriation contained herein. 
The positions are funded within Article 23, the Operating Budget.) 



5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Board Bylaws, other 

than wage and salary classification, as recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Voted Article 16. That the Town approve this article and that new positions created on or after this 
date will not be eligible for a step increase until July, 2002. 

5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Board Bylaws so as to 

reclassify certain existing positions, as recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Voted Article 17. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the funds necessary, by 

borrowing or otherwise, to implement the collective bargaining agreements between the Board of 
Selectmen and the various unions under the Board of Selectmen, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



Voted Article 18. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 



29 



5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the funds necessary, by 

borrowing or otherwise, to implement the collective bargaining agreements between the School 
Department personnel and the Town, which includes, but is not limited to, teachers, school 
administrators, custodians, cafeteria workers, clerical and non union employees, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 19. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 44. Section 

53P/2, of the Massachusetts General Laws, for the purpose of establishing a Fire Department 
Ambulance enterprise fund effective fiscal year 2002, said Fund to be under the direction of the 
Fire Chief and to be used to receive funds from residents and others for ambulance services, and 
further to allow the Fire Chief to expend funds from the Fund for ambulance service expenses, 
contingent upon an annual report from the Fire Chief to the Board of Selectmen on the total 
receipts and expenditures of the Fund each fiscal year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 20. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate, by bonowing or otherwise, the 

amount of $195,000 for the purpose of funding the Fire Department Ambulance Enterprise Fund 
established in Article 23, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 21. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to approve an agreement with an ambulance 

service for a period of more than four (4) years and appropriate the sum of $150,000, by borrowing 
or otherwise, for the purpose of funding the agreement, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 22. That the Town appropriate the sum of $150,000 for the purpose specified in the 
article. Said appropriation to come from the town's Stabilization Fund. 



30 



5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 23. To act on the report of the Finance Committee on the Fiscal Year 2002 budget and 
to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds money for the operation of the Town's 
Departments and the payment of debt service and all other necessary and proper expenses for the 
year, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted Article 23. That this article be approved and that the following amounts of money 
($34,476,978) be appropriated for the several purposes hereinafter itemized. Each numbered line 
item is to be considered a separate appropriation. The budgeted amounts may only be spent for the 
stated purpose. 

5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 



31 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK 
FY2002 OPERATING BUDGET 



Ixool 



Line 


Identification 


voiea. 


From: 


From: 


Source 


From: | 


Item 




Appropriation 


1 ax naie 


Avail. Funds 


Of $ 


Bonding | 


1 


Moderator - Expenses 


/fx r- r\ 

$ 50 


$ 50 








2 


Finance Committee - Secretary 


$ 1 ,000 


$ 1 ,000 








3 


Expenses 


$ 250 


$ 250 








4 


Selectmen - Salaries 


$ 97,490 


$ 97,490 








5 


Expenses 


$ 16,505 


$ 16,505 








6 


Administration Building - Salaries 


$ 67,623 


$ 41,927 


$ 25,696 


w/s 




7 


Expenses 


$ 13,346 


$ 7,114 


$ 6,232 


w/s 




8 


Animal Control Officer - Salary 


$ 29,850 


$ 29,850 








9 


Expenses 


$ 1 ,550 


$ 1,550 








9A 


Clothing Allowance 


$ 300 


$ 300 






1 


10 


Boarding Animals/Pound/Supplies 


$ 1,500 


$ 1 ,500 








11 


Law Department 


$ 55,000 


$ 47,057 


$ 7,943 


w/s 




12 


Parking Ticket Clerk - Salary 


$ 1 


$ 1 








14 


1 a I ■ 1 ■ • r — _ 

Workers Compensation - Expenses, 


$ 295,000 


$ 295,000 










Benefits and Insurance 












16 


Accounting Department - Salaries 


$ 184,100 


$ 136,418 


$ 47,682 


w/s 




16A 


Uncompensated Balances 


$ 275,000 


$ 275,000 








17 


Expenses 


$ 66,750 


$ 60,743 


$ 6,007 


w/s 




18 


Treasurer - Salaries 


$ 44,352 


$ 44,352 








19 


Expenses 


$ 9,265 


$ 8,283 


$ 982 


w/s 




20 


Town Clerk - Collector - Salaries 


$ 124,095 


$ 106,970 


$ 17,125 


w/s 




21 


Stipend per MGL Ch. 41 , Section 108P 


$ 1 ,000 


$ 1,000 








22 


Town Postage Account (for all depts.) 


$ 31,500 


$ 25,547 


$ 5,953 


w/s 




23 


Tax Title 


$ 15,000 


$ 15,000 








24 


Expenses 


$ 20,600 


d^ -4 —7 ^ — 7 

$ 16,707 


$ 3,893 


w/s 




25 


Election Commission - Salaries 


$ 34,333 


$ 34,333 








26 


Expenses 


$ 10,732 


$ 10,732 








27 


Asessors - Salaries 


$ 126,804 


$ 126,804 








28 


Expenses 


$ 12,900 


$ 12,900 








29 


Outside Services 


$ 15,000 


$ 15,000 






^ 


30 


Zoning Board of Appeals - Secretary 


$ 2,898 


$ 2,898 








31 


Expenses 


$ 4,186 


$ 4,186 








32 


Planning Board - Secretary 


$ 1 ,000 


$ 1 ,000 








33 


Expenses 


$ 500 


$ 500 








34 


Contributory Retirement - Pension Cent. 


$ 1,906,120 


$ 1,702,738 


$ 203,382 


w/s 




35 


Non-Contributory Retirement - Pen. Contrib. 


$ 247,000 


$ 247,000 








36 


Police - Salaries 


$ 2,179,949 


$ 2,179,949 








37 


Part-time Custodian 


$ 12,836 


$ 12,836 






i 


38 


Selective Enforcement 


$ 6,479 


$ 6,479 






l 


39 


School Traffic Supervisors 


$ 95,924 


$ 95,924 








40 


Expenses 


$ 185,838 


$ 185,838 








40A 


Legal Expenses 


$ 12,000 


$ 12,000 








41 


Police Vehicles 


$ 102,000 


$ 34,000 


$ 68,000 


STAB 




42 


Fire - Salanes 


$ 2,015,113 


$ 2,015,113 






1( 


44 


Expenses 


$ 98,670 


$ 98,670 








45 


Lynn Dispatch 


$ 60,000 


$ 60,000 








46 


Training 


$ 24,700 


$ 24,700 








47 


Harbormaster - Salary 


$ 6,567 


$ 6,567 








48 


Expenses 


$ 3,856 


$ 3,856 








49 


Emergency Management - Director 


$ 1 ,344 


$ 1 ,344 








50 


Expenses 


$ 456 


$ 456 








51 


Sealer of Weights and Measures - Salary 


$ 5,971 


$ 5,971 






j 


52 


Expenses 


$ 495 


$ 495 








32 I 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK 
FY2002 OPERATING BUDGET 



Jne 


Identification 


Voted: 


From: 


From: 


Source 


From: 


tem 




Appropriation 


Tax Rate 


Avail. Funds 


of $ 


Bonding 


53 


Constable - Salary 


$ 100 


$ 100 








54 


Building/Plumbing/Gas Inspector - Salaries 


$ 109,652 


$ 109,652 








55 


Expenses 


$ 7,000 


$ 7,000 








56 


Wire Inspector - Salaries 


$ 28,548 


$ 28,548 








57 


Expenses 


$ 10,460 


$ 10,460 








58 


Conservation Commission - Expenses 


$ 800 


$ 800 








59 


Insurance-Group Health/Property/Casualty 


$ 2,405.415 


$ 2.333,253 


$ 72,162 


W/S 




60 


Health Department - Salaries 


$ 110,723 


$ 110.723 








62 


Expenses 


$ 3,695 


$ 3.695 








63 


Inspections and Tests 


$ 13,300 


$ 13.300 








63A 


State Mandated Testing 


$ 12,200 


$ 12.200 








64 


Rubbish and Recyclables Collections 


$ 896,150 


$ 896,150 








65 


Public Works - General Salaries 


$ 369,089 


$ 369,089 








66 
67 


General Expenses 


$ 130,012 


$ 130,012 








Snow and Ice 


$ 75,000 


$ 75.000 








68 


Highway Maintenance (Includes $ for 


$ 55,000 


$ 55,000 










Ch. 497 wk and repairs to private roads) 












)8A 


Curb repair and granite replacement 


$ 7,500 


$ 7,500 








69 


Water/Sewer Salaries 


$ 473,266 


$ 26,530 


$ 446,736 


W/S 




70 


Water/Sewer Expenses 


$ 97,650 




$ 97,650 


W/S 




71 


MWRA/Lynn Water 


$ 1,073,000 




$1,073,000 


W/S 




73 


Wastewater Operations 


$ 700,000 




$ 700,000 


W/S 




74 


Cemetery - Salaries 


$ 181,232 


$ 111 ,232 


$ 70.000 


C/R 




75 


Cemetery Expenses 


$ 17,238 


$ 17,238 








76 


DPW Special Accounts 


$ 176,000 


$ 156,000 


$ 20.000 


W/S 




77 


Recreation Commission - Salaries 


$ 64,040 


$ 64,040 








78 


Expenses 


$ 1 1 ,370 


$ 1 1 ,370 








79 


Council on Aging - Salaries 


$ 54,204 


$ 54.204 








79A 


Part-time positions with no benefits 


$ 7,500 


$ 7.500 








80 


Expenses 


$ 28,886 


$ 28.886 








81 


Veterans' Services - Director's Salary 


$ 8,947 


$ 8.947 








82 


Expenses 


$ 21,250 


$ 21.250 








83 


Assistance 


$ 10,000 


$ 10,000 








84 


Debt - Municipal 


$ 1,459,183 


$ 1,277,883 


$ 181,300 


W/S 




85 


Debt - Water/Sewer 


$ 1,318.547 


$ 992,814 


$ 228,628 


W/S 






$1 ,089,919 funded-Sewer Debrt Override 






$ 97,105 


STA 




86 


Library - Salaries 


$ 349,079 


$ 349,079 








87 


Expenses 


$ 33,950 


$ 33,950 








88 


Materials 


$ '107,400 


' $ 1 07,400 








89 


Town Reports 


$ 3,244 


$ 3,244 








90 


Telephone Expense - most departments 


$ 35,000 


$ 31,000 


$ 4,000 


W/S 




91 


Street Lighting 


$ 160,000 


$ 160,000 








92 


Reserve Fund 


$ 220.000 


$ 220,000 








93 


Settlements 


$ 1 .000 


$ 1 ,000 








94 


Audit 


$ 25,000 


$ 25,000 








95 


Historical Commission 


$ 1 ,000 


$ 1 ,000 








96 


Medicare Tax ■ 


$ 200,000 


$ 130,051 


$ 69,949 


W/S 




97 


HAWC 


$ 2,500 


$ 2,500 








98 


Stabilization/Capital Improvement Fund 


$ 541,500 


$ 541,500 








99 


Clerical Pool 


$ 29,500 


$ 29,500 








100 


Regional Vocational School 


$ 97,032 


$ 97,032 








101 


School Budget 


$16,208,000 ! $ 16,208,000 










TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 


$36,475,960 $33,022,535 


$3,453,425 







33 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK 
FY2002 OPERATING BUDGET 

































Budget Notes: Available Funding Sources: 














W/S=Water/Sewer Fees 














C/R=Cemetery Receipts 














STA=Secondary Treatment Account 














STAB=Stailization Account 




















































1 


Line 


Identification 


Voted: 


From: 


From: 


Source 


From: 


Item 




Appropriation 


Tax Rate 


Avail. Funds 


of $ 


Bonding 


A-6 


Transfer: To Fin Com Reserve Fund 


$ 21,690 




$ 21,690 








$3,290 from Fin Com '01 Budget - Secretary 












$10,000 from '01 Unclassified - Clerical 














$8,400 from '01 Selectmen's Budget - Administration 










A-7 


Capital Improvement Projects - 20 projects 


$ 1,394,000 








$ 1 ,394,000! 


A-22 


Ambulance Service 


$ 150,000 




$ 150,000 


STAB 




A-23 


Annual Operating Budget - FY 2002 


$36,475,960 


$ 33,022,535 


$3,453,425 






A-24 


Transfer: To Compensated Absence Fund 


$ 256,000 




$ 256,000 


STAB 




A-25 


DPW - Highway Projects 


$ 79,000 




$ 79,000 


MA Highway Funds i 


A-26 


GASB 34 - Fixed Asset Accounting 


$ 15,000 


$ 15,000 








A-38 


Flashing School Zone signs for Essex St. 


$ 10,000 


$ 10,000 








A-42 


DPW - Water System Work 


$ 560,266 








$ 560,2661 


A-51 


Transfer:To Current Revenue 


$ 710,000 




$ 710,000 


Surplus Revenue 


STM-2 


Capital Improvement Projects - 10 projects 


$ 709,000 








$ 709,000. 


















TOTAL BUDGET AND ARTICLES 


$40,380,916 


$33,047,535 | $4,670,115 | 


$2,663,266 



I 

Si 

i " 
I) » 



34 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will authorize the transfer of $256,000 from the 

Stabilization Fund to a new special purpose "Compensated Absence Fund" for the purpose of 
funding accrued employee vacation and sick leave liabilities. 

Voted Article 24. That the town appropriate the sum of $256,000 for the purpose stated in the 
article. Said appropriation to come from the Stabilization Fund. 

5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from available funds the amount 

of $79,000.00 from the Massachusetts Highway Department under the provisions of Chapter 53(B) 
of the Acts of 1999 and Chapter 150 of the Acts of 2000 of the Massachusetts General Laws. Said 
funds to be used by the Department of Public Works for highway projects approved by the 
Massachusetts Highway Department pursuant to this section, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 25. That the town approve this article. 

5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $15,000 for the 

purpose of complying with GASB 34 reporting requirements for fixed assets, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Accountant 

Voted Article 26. That the Town approve this article. 

5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General Bylaws of the Town of 

Swampscott Article IV, Section 23, Line 8, — Department Heads Committee — by deleting the 
following: 

"The Committee shall appoint one of the members of the Committee to be Chairperson for 
a term of six (6) months and, from time to time, remove and replace that person and appoint 
someone to act in that person's place during any absence." 
And adding the following: 

'The Executive Secretary to the Board of Selectmen shall serve as the Committee's 
Chairperson." 

or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Department Heads Committee 

Voted Article 27. That the town amend the General By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott as 
specified in the article. 

5/1/2001. Majority vote. 



35 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition 

the Legislature (or the third and General Court) to amend the Town Charter. Chapter 2. Section 5. 
page A-4. as it relates to the filling of Town Meeting vacancies as follows: 

That the words "for the unexpired term of office" in the second paragraph of said section 

be replaced with the words "until the next annual election". 

Further, that the words "for the remainder of the unexpired term" in the fifth sentence of 
paragraph three be replaced with the words "until the next annual election". 

Further, that the words "for the remainder of the unexpired term" in the fifth sentence of 
paragraph three be replaced with the words "until the next annual election". 

Further, that this article shall become effective upon approval of the legislature and 
subsequent approval of the voters at the next annual or special election, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by Town Clerk-Collector Jack L. Paster et al 
Voted Article 28. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
5/1/2001. Majority Vote. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition 

the State Legislature to amend the Town Charter, Chapter 2. Section?, as it relates to the number of 
additional members of the Finance Committee as follows: 

That the words "two additional voters at large" in the first paragraph of said section be replaced 
with the words "three additional voters at large". 

Further, that this article shall become effective upon the approval of the legislature and subsequent 
approval of the voters at the next annual or special election, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Election Commissiorers 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the 

State Legislature to amend the Town Charter, Chapter 3, Section 3, as it relates to the number of 
additional members of the Recreation Commission as follows: 

That the words "one to be appointed At Large" in the first paragraph, first sentence, of said section 
be replaced with the words "two to be appointed At Large". 

In addition, that the second sentence in the first paragraph of said section be deleted and replaced 
with: 

"The Board of Selectmen shall initially appoint one At Large member and two precinct members 
for three year terms, two precinct members for two year temis, and one precinct member and one 
At Large member for a one year teim." 



36 



This article shall become effective upon the approval of the legislature and subsequent approval of 
the voters at the next annual or special election, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Election Commissioners 

NOTE: Articles 29 and 30 were combined. 5/1/2001. Majority vote. 

Voted Articles 29 and 30. That action on these articles be postponed indefinitely. 

5/1/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article 7 of the Town of Swampscott 

Traffic Rules and Regulations to include Section 19 as follows: 

"No person shall operate a motorized scooter, motorized skateboard, or other 
similar motorized vehicle on a public way. sidewalk, playground, or on any 
property owned by the Town of Swampscott. The following vehicles shall be 
exempt from the provision of this Bylaw: 

a) Vehicles licensed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as motor 
vehicles 

b) Vehicles used by handicapped persons, and 

c) Landscaping equipment 

d) Motorized bicycles as defined in MGL Chapter 90, Section 1. and 
operated in accordance with the provisions of MGL Chapter 90, 
Section IB 

Any person violating the provisions of this Bylaw would be subject to a $50.00 
fine", or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Police Chief 

Voted Article 3 1 . That the subject matter of this arficle be referred to the Board of 
Selectmen for further study. 

5/1/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate, by boiTowing or otherwise, the 

amount of $20,000 to be used for traffic enforcement, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Police Chief 

Voted Article 32. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

5/1/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of MGL c. 32, §20A. 

which indemnifies a member of the Swampscott Retirement Board from any civil action brought 
against him or her for all expenses incurred in the defense thereof and for damages to the same 
extent as other public employees in the Town of Swampscott. or take any action relative thereto. 



37 



Sponsored by the Swampscott Contributory Retirement Board 
Voted Article 33. That this article be approved. 
5/1/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of MGL c. 32. 

§20(6)(a). which allows the elected and appointed members of the Swampscott Retirement Board 
to receive a stipend of $3,000 per annum for the administration and oversight of the Swampscott 
Retirement System, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Swampscott Contributory Retirement Board 

Voted Article 34. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

5/1/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $19,000, by 

borrowing or otherwise, for the purpose of replacing and installing at a new location the Viet Nam 
Memorial and repairs to other monuments, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen, the Veterans' Agent and Veterans" Affairs 
Committee 

Voted Article 35. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
5/1/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw and Zoning Map 

by extending the Residence A-3 District so as to rezone and include in said Residence A-3 District 
the Parcels shown on Assessors Plate 7, Lot 2, and Lots 213 through 255, inclusive and including 
"Cushing Avenue", "Goldthwait Terrace" and "Russell Terrace". Said land being described as 
follows: 

Lots 124 — 168 inclusive and the areas shown as Cushing Avenue. Goldthwait 
Terrace and Russell Terrace, all as shown on a plan made for Mary A. Breed by 
Eastman & Bradford, dated July 12, 1906 and duly recorded with Essex South 
District Registry of Deeds in Book 3535, Page 001 . Also a little strip of land on the 
northeastern side of Cushing Avenue, as shown on said plan, between land now or 
formerly of S. J. Cushing and said Avenue, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by Brenda J. Gomez, et al 

Voted Article 36. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

5/1/2001. Majority vote. 



38 



ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article XIII, Section 14, paragraph 

(a). Line 2, of the Town of Swarnpscott"s General Bylaws to include: 

"Two alternate members shall be voting members to serve as full members in their 
absence" following "terms of three (3) years" and before "The terms of the members appointed...", 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Earth Removal Advisory Committee 

Voted Article 37. That the Town amend the General By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott as 
specified in the article. 

5/2/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $10,000, by 

borrowing or otherwise, for the purpose of purchasing and installing two (2) flashing "20 MPH — 
School Zone" signs for Essex Street, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen, the Traffic Safety Committee and the Police 
Department 

Voted Article 38. That the town appropriate the sum of $10,000 for the purpose specified in the 
article. 

5/2/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article 31 of the 2000 Annual Town 

Meeting accepting the provisions of Section 59 of Chapter 127 of the Acts of 1999, by increasing 
the annual income for eligibility for the Senior Citizen Property Tax Work-Off Program from 
$40,000 to a total annual single income to $45,000 and total annual combined income to $60,000, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 39. That this article be approved. 

5/2/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provision of Massachusetts 

General Law authorizing the ADA Committee (Commission on Disability) to receive all or a 
portion of the handicapped parking fines collected by the Town, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 40. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

5/2/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 41 . To see if the Town will vote to place the following question on the official 

ballot at an annual town election: 



39 



Shall the town vote to accept the provisions of section thirteen of Chapter 258 of the 
General Laws which provides that the town shall indemnify and save harmless municipal 
officers, elected or appointed, from personal financial loss and expense including 
reasonable legal fees and costs, if any, in an amount not to exceed one million dollars, 
arising out of any claim, demand, suit or judgment by reason of any act or omission except 
at intentional violation of civil rights of any person under any law, if the official at the time 
of such act or omission was acting within the scope of his official duties or employment? 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen and the Board of Public Works 

Voted Article 41. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

5/2/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $560,266 to improve the 

Town's water system and that to meet this appropriate, the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow $560,266 under MGL c. 44; and the Board of 
Selectmen and/or the Board of Public Works be authorized to contract for and expend any federal, 
state or MWRA aid available for the project, provided that the amount of the authorized borrowing 
shall be reduced by the amount such aid received prior to the issuance of bonds or notes under this 
vote and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the Board of Public Works be authorized to take any 
other action necessary to carry out this project. 

Sponsored by the Board of Public Works 

Voted Article 42. That the Town appropriate the sum of $560,266 for the purposes specified in 
the Article; further, that the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be 
authorized to borrow this amount through the issuance of bonds or notes under the appropriate 
section of the Massachusetts General Laws, and that the Treasurer be authorized to combine the 
borrowing with any other borrowing authorized by this Town Meeting. 

5/2/200L Unanimous Vote. 



ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town General Bylaws, by 

deleting Section 8 of Article IV and by substituting in its place the following: 

"Section 8. Every Board or Officer in charge of a Department may, with the 
written approval of the Board of Selectmen, sell any personal property or material 
belonging to the Town not required by said Department in accordance with the 
provisions of Section 15 of Chapter 30B of the Massachusetts General Laws, as the 
said Section and Chapter may from time to time be amended", 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen and the Acting Chief Procurement Officer 

Voted Article 43. That this article be approved. 

5/2/2001. Majority vote. 



40 



ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to approve the establishment of a Department 

of Finance in the Town of Swampscott as follows: 

Section 1 . There is hereby established in the Town of Swampscott, hereinafter referred 
to as the town, a Department of Finance which shall be responsible for the overall management and 
administration of the town's financial operations and services. The Department of Finance shall be 
under the direction of a chief financial officer, thereinafter referred to as the Finance Director, who 
shall be responsible to the Board of Selectmen for the duties specified in this act. 

Section 2. The Board of Selectmen shall appoint the Finance Director for a term of 
three years. 

Section 3. Said Finance Director shall be a person qualified in accordance with the 
bylaws of the town and especially suited by education, training and experience to perform the 
duties of the office. Said Finance Director shall devote full time to the duties of this position and 
shall not engage in any other business or occupation during this term except as permitted herein. 
Any person appointed or reappointed to such position shall meet such additional qualifications as 
may be established by bylaw or in accordance with the town's personnel bylaw. 

Section 4. The Department of Finance shall assume and be responsible for the 
functions and statutory duties of the offices of Town Accountant, Town Treasurer/Collector and 
their respective departments, each of which shall become a division within the Department of 
Finance. 

Section 5. The responsibilities and duties of said Finance Director shall include the 
following: 

Except as otherwise expressly prohibited by general or special law or bylaw of the town, 
said Finance Director shall supervise, direct and be responsible for the overall management and 
administration of the Department of Finance. In addition, the responsibilities of said Finance 
Director shall include, but not be limited to, the following: 

To coordinate and manage the town-wide annual operating and capital budget process for all town 
departments, officers, boards, committees and commissions, in cooperation with those entities; 

To compile and coordinate for all town departments, officers, boards, committees and commissions 
their operating and capital budgets. And present a recommendation to the Finance Committee for 
all budgets and capital items; 

To receive, evaluation and provide o the Finance Committee recommendations with respect to all 
requests for transfers from the town's reserve fund; 

To prepare and maintain long-term financial forecasts,; including revenue expectations, future 
impFications of operating budget program decisions and capital budget programs related to 
infrastructure maintenance, improvements and expansion; 

To manage the financing and refinancing processes of the town, including financing strategies to 
maximize future flexibility relative to long-term capital expenditure forecasts; 



41 



To monitor actual line item income and expense information for all town departments and prepare 
financial and statistical reports relative to approved operating and capital budgets; 

To advise all town officers, departments, boards, committees and commissions on financial and 
financing implications of operational proposals; and 

To report to the annual town meeting, in wrifing, upon the financial condition of the town and the 
administration of the town's financial affairs. 

Said Finance Director shall recommend for approval by the Board of Selectmen the appointment of 
the Town Accountant and Town Treasurer/Collector. The persons to be appointed to these 
positions shall meet the qualifications established by general or special law, town bylaw or 
regulations established thereunder. 

Said Finance Director, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, shall be authorized to organize 
or reorganize the Department of Finance and to assign, within the department, the personnel 
reporting to the Town Accountant and the Treasurer/Collector. Said Finance Director, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, shall have the authority to implement the reorganization of the 
department on an interim basis pending such approvals as my be required by the personnel bylaw. 

Said finance Director shall have access to all town books, papers and records of any sort for 
information necessary for the proper performance of the duties defined herein. All to n officers, 
boards, committees and commissions shall respond promptly, thoroughly and accurately to 
requests for information made by said Finance Director. Any contract or agreement entered into by 
town officers, boards, comrnittees or commissions that impacts the current or future financial 
condition of the town, other than those covered by the town's purchasing bylaw, shall be submitted 
to aid Finance Director within seven days of signing. 

All town departments, officers, boards, committees and commissions shall keep said Finance 
Director fully informed as to the progress of all labor negotiations. Said Finance Director shall 
prepare and submit to the Finance Committee and town meeting, as part of the process to consider 
appropriation of moneys to fund any negotiated labor agreement which effects the town, its 
department, officers, boards, committee or commissions, an analysis of the financial impact on the 
town of any such labor agreement throughout the entirely of its proposed term together with a 
recommendation for action by the Finance Committee or town meeting. 

Said Finance Director shall have such additional duties and responsibilities as may from time to 
time be delegated by the Board of Selectmen or as authorized by general or special law or tow 
bylaw and may be relieved of any duties and responsibilities if so provide by an amendment to this 
act. 

Section 6. The various town officers, departments, boards, committees and 
commissions charged with the expenditure of town funds shall, not later that the date set in town 
bylaw for the submission of articles and budgets, or at such other the as directed by said Finance 
Director, prepare and submit to said Finance Director detailed estimates of the amount deemed by 
them to be necessary for the administration of their respective duties for the ensuing fiscal year for 
the capital items to be considered for the ensuring fiscal year and future years , with explanatory 
statements of the reasons for the amounts requested. The specific format and categories of this 
information shall be as directed by said Finance Director, with the approval of the Finance 



42 



Committee, unless otherwise voted by town meeting before commencement of the budget process 
in any year. 

Section 7. Said Finance Director shall present to the Finance Committee, not less than 
sixty days prior to the annual town meeting and within an appropriate time period prior to any 
special town meeting called to consider budgetary matters or articles requiring the appropriation of 
funds or otherwise having a financial impact upon the town, recommendations on the detailed 
estimates of all revenues, the operating and capital expenditures for the administration of all town 
departments, boards, committees and commissions with respect to the annual town meeting, and 
changes thereto with respect to any such special town meeting. Said Finance Director shall present 
to the Finance Committee, capital improvement committee and the town meeting recommendations 
as to the source from which such appropriations shall be funded. 

Section 8. Said Finance Director may also be appointed by the Board of Selectmen to 
serve concurrently in any one of the following positions: Town Treasurer/Collector, Town 
Accountant; or other such financial officer of the Town; provided, however, that he satisfies all of 
the job requirements established for any such position. 

Section 9. Each request made by any town officer, department, board, committee or 
commission for transfer of funds from the town's reserve fund shall, prior to submission to the 
Finance committee, be submitted to said Finance Director who shall prepare an evaluation and 
recommendation to the Finance Committee regarding each such request. 

Section 10. Said Finance Director shall have the authority to make appropriate motions 
to the town meeting regarding any articles that relates to operating or capital appropriations for the 
town. 

Section 11. Nothing in this act shall serve to prevent any officer, department, board, 
committee or commission of the town from appearing before the Finance Committee, town 
meeting or any of its committees to present or discuss budgetary or appropriation requests. 

Section 12. The Board of Selectmen shall make the initial appointment to the position 
of Finance Director within one hundred and eighty days after the effective date of this act. At the 
sole discretion of the Board of Selectmen, but only for the purpose of coordinating the expiration 
date of such initial appointment with those of other similar positions of the town, the initial term of 
appointment of said Finance Director may be for less than three but not less that two years. 

Any person holding any office or position in a town agency affected by the provision of this act 
shall continue such office or position, subject to further assignment, order of said Finance Director 
or expiration of the current term of office. All such officers and employees serving in such town 
agencies shall be continued in the .service of the town, subject to the foregoing, without loss of pay 
or benefit to which they might otherwise have been entitled. 

Section 13. The town, by bylaw, may establish additional requirements and standards 
for the Department of Finance and may modify and amend the organization and structure of said 
department, provided however, that all such modifications and amendments are consistent with the 
provisions and purposes of this act or the provision of any act relative thereto. 

Section 14. This act shall take effect upon its passage by a town meeting vote. 



43 



Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 44. That the Moderator be directed to appoint a committee to study the matters 
contained in this article, the financial management review report from the Massachusetts 
Department of Revenue and other matters relating to town government and that the committee 
report back at a Special Town Meeting this fall.. 

5/2/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Swampscott Town 

Charter, pursuant to the charter amendment process set forth in G.L. c43B, to combine the elected 
positions of Town Clerk/Collector and Town Treasurer into one position to be appointed by the 
Board of Selectmen, or take any action relative thereto.. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition 

the General court for special legislation, on file with the office of the Town Clerk, to amend the 
Town of Swampscott Charter to combine the elected positions of Town Clerk/Collector and Town 
Treasurer into one position to be appointed by the Board of Selectmen, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 
NOTE: Articles 45 and 46 were combined. 5/2/2001. Majority vote. 

Voted Article 46. That the Town authorize and direct the Board of Selectmen to: (1) petition the 
General Court for special legislation, on file with the office of the Town Clerk, to amend the Town 
of Swampscott Charter to combine the elected positions of Town Clerk/Collector and Town 
Treasurer into one position to be appointed by the Board of Selectmen; (2) grant the present elected 
incumbent to receive a three-year contract from the Board of Selectmen, effective July 1, 2001 
through June 30, 2004; (3) add $10,000.00 to the compensation of the existing Fiscal Year (FY02) 
appropriation for the combined salaries of Treasurer, Collector and Clerk; and (4) that the 
appointed position of Town Clerk/Treasurer and Collector shall report to the elected Board of 
Selectmen, or their designee being the Executive Secretary, or a Town Manager or Administrator, 
should the Town of Swampscott authorize such a position in the future. 

5/2/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to adopt Chapter 242, Acts of 2000 as codified 

in MGL c. 3 1, §58A, which reads as follows: 

"Section 58A. Notwithstanding the provisions of any general or special law to the 
contrary, in any city, town or district that accepts this section, no person shall be eligible to 
have his name certified for original appointment to the position of firefighter or police 
officer if such person has reached his thirty-second birthday on the date of the entrance 
examination. Any veteran shall be allowed to exceed the maximum age provision of this 
section by the number of years served on active military duty, but in no case shall said 
candidate for appointment be credited more than four years of active military duty." 
or take any action relative thereto. 



44 



Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen, Police Chief and Fire Chief 
Voted Article 47. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
5/2/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws as follows: 

Replace the cuixent Section 2.2.7.5 with the following language: 

"2.2.7.5 Catastrophe, Demolition or Condemnation. Any nonconforming 

structure may be reconstructed after demolition or condemnation resulting from 
fire, explosion or other catastrophe, or after voluntary demolition, provided that 
such reconstruction is completed within twelve months after such catastrophe, 
demolition or condemnation, and provided that the building(s) as reconstructed 
shall be only as great in volume or area as the original nonconforming structure 
unless a larger volume or area is authorized by special permit from the Board of 
Appeals, and further provided that reconstruction is approved by the Planning 
Board pursuant to 5.4.0.0. Such time for reconstruction may be extended by the 
Board of Appeals for good cause." 

Replace the current Section 3.2.2.5 with the following language: 

"3.2.2.5. All signs, except temporary signs listed in Section 3.2.5.3. shall be related 
haiTHoniously to the buildings to which they are attached or, if free-standing, to 
adjacent buildings. Signs shall be compatible in character, material, appearance, 
and scale with the general character of Swampscott and shall endeavor to enhance 
the visual environment." 

Replace the current Section 2.3.6.0 with the following language: 

"2.3.6.0. Dimensional Special Permit. The Board of Appeals may grant a special 
permit to reduce otherwise applicable requirement for lot area, frontage, width, 
yard, height or lot coverage restrictions, the grant of which shall render the lot or 
structure non-conforming, upon a finding that:" 

Replace the current Section 3.2.5.0, 3.2.5.1, 3.2.5.2, and 3.2.5.3 with the following 

language: 

"3.2.5.0. Specific Sign Types. 

3.2.5. 1 . Window signs. Temporary and permanent window signs are 
permitted only in the first-floor windows of a building. The total 
area of all signs (temporary and permanent added together) in any 
window shall not exceed 25% of the glass area of the window. 
Window signs may be illuminated. 

3.2.5.2. Temporary Sign Requirements. There shall be no temporary or 
special promotional signs except as provided in section 3.2.5.3. 



45 



when so permitted, temporary signs shall conform to the following 
requirements: 

a. Permitted temporary signs shall not exceed six (6) square 
feet in area per face and be limited to two faces. 

b. Permitted temporary signs shall not be located on or 
attached to utility poles, municipal sign poles, fences, trees 
or public property. 

c. Permitted temporary signs shall not obstruct visibility for 
vehicular traffic on public or private property. 

d. Permitted temporary signs shall not be illuminated, except 
as otherwise noted in the following section. 

e. Permitted temporary signs shall be permitted to remain for 
fifty (50) days, except as otherwise noted in the following 
section. A minimum of thirty (30) days shall elapse 
between the removal and erection of a temporary sign of 
substantially similar content, except as otherwise noted. 

f. No more than two (2) permitted temporary signs are 
allowed per property lot. However, in the case of a two- 
family house on one lot, each dwelling unit may erect two 
(2) signs. (One sign on opposite faces of a free-standing 
double-sided sign will count as only one sign.) 

3.2.5.3. Temporary Signs Permitted. Only the following temporary signs 
are allowed: 

a. "Car wash", "fair", "bazaar", and similar signs, such as used 
by a school or business for a one-day special event 
(provided that any other required permits or authonzation 
have been received), shall be allowed for seven(7) days. 

b. "Garage sale" signs (provided that any other required 
permits or authorizations have been received) shall be 
allowed for two (2) days. 

c. "Open house" signs used for real estate purposes (provided 
that any other required permits or authorizations have been 
received) shall be allowed for one (1 ) day. "Open house" 
signs may be displayed every six (6) days. 

d. Signs that advertise proposed subdivisions as outlined in the 
Swampscott Rules and Regulations. Such signs may remain 
for the period required by Swampscott Rules and 
Regulations, and may be illuminated. 

e. The seasonal display of signs and exterior lighting for the 
purpose of celebration of holidays and may be illuminated. 

f Signs for municipal purposes may be illuminated. 

g. "Message signs" that relate to an election or ballot question, 
or convey political or other opinions. | 



46 



Replace the current Section 4.3.2.0 and 4.3.2. 1 . with the following 
language: 

4.3.2.0. Location of District. The WCSOD shall include the following 

parcels (locations provided for convenience): 1 - 1 88-0 (Humphrey 
Street). 1-190-0 (Monument Avenue), 1-94-0 (22 Monument 
Avenue), 1-94A-0 (22 Monument Avenue), 1 1-415-0 (Nichols 
Street), 12-98-0 (Essex Street), 13-1-0 (Essex Street), 14-78-0 
(Paradise Road), 2-1-0 (9Monument Avenue), 21-2-0 (Humphrey 
Street), 21-35-0 (209 Puritan Road), 21-35-0 (209 Puritan 
Road),23-41-0 (Forest Avenue), 23-42A-0 (Forest Avenue), 24-27- 
(Puritan Road), 24-E40-0 (Humphrey Street), 3-31-0 (22 Duncan 
Terrace (6]), 5-211-0 (200 Paradise Road), 6-1 16-0 (10 Pitman 
Road), 8-101-0 (Woods Road), 8-11-0 (Manson Avenue), 8-12-0 
(Marion Street), 8-2-0 (Bulfmch Road), 8-27-0 (Coolidge Road.), 8- 
5-0 (Manson Road), 8-6-0 (Manson Road) and 6-187-0 (Cherry 
Street). 

Replace the current Section 5.4.5.1. with the following language: 

5.4.5.1. For construction activities identified in 5.4.2.1, 5.4.2.4, 5.4.2.5 and 5.4.2.6, 
five (5) separate plans prepared at a scale of one (1) inch equals twenty (20) feet, or 
other such scale as may be approved by the Planning Board, shall be submitted. 
The plans are as follows: 

a. Site layout which shall contain the boundaries of the lots(s) 
in the proposed development, locations and dimensions of 
proposed structures, driveways, internal roadways and 
access ways to adjacent public roadways, all parking areas, 
loading areas, walkways, and areas for snow storage after 
plowing. The first sheet of this plan shall be a locus plan, at 
a scale of one (1) inch equals one hundred (100) feet, 
showing the entire project and its relation to existing areas, 
buildings and roads for a distance of one thousand (1000) 
feet from the project boundaries or other distance as may be 
required by the Planning Board. The locus plan shall show 
the footprint of the proposed building, footprints of houses 
and other buildings on abutting lots, distances from 
proposed building to all property lot lines and distances of 
adjacent houses and other buildings on abutting lots to the 
applicant's property lines. 

Replace current Section 5.4.2.3. with the following language: 

5.4.2.3. Residential - new. Any new construction, or reconstruction after 
demolition, of a single or two family residence involving more than 
five thousand (5.000) square feet of gross floor area. 

Sponsored by Planning Board 



47 



Voted Article 48. That the town amend the Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Swampscott as 
specified in the article. 

5/2/2001. Unanimous vote. 



Voted Article 48. That the following proposed Zoning By Law amendment be referred back to the 
Planning Board for further study: Lot, frontage of: A lot line coinciding with the sideline of a 
street which provides both legal rights of vehicular access and physical vehicular access to the lot. 
said line to be measured continuously along a single street or along two (2) intersecting. See 
Figure 2 in Appendix B. 

5/2/2001. Majority vote. 



ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to adopt Chapter 105 of the Acts of 2000. authorizing 
Towns to provide for their printing of the Annual Reports on a Fiscal Year basis and to amend 
Article 4, Section 2 — Duties of Town Officers, of the Town of Swampscott General Bylaws by 
adding "and to permit such printing on a fiscal year basis" after "printed in the Annual Town 
Report" and before "shall be submitted to the Board of Selectmen..." and by replacing the word 
"January" with the word "July" after "no later than" and before "fifth of each year", or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 49. That the Town accept the provisions of Chapter 105 of the Acts of 2000 as 
specified in the article. 

5/2/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money, by borrowing or 
otherwise, for the purchase of twelve (12) doggie bag dispensers and fifteen (15) units of bags, or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Dog Park Committee 

Voted Article 50. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

5/2/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Surplus Revenue Account 

of the Town to the account of Current Revenue a sum of money to be used and applied by the 
Board of Assessors in the reduction of the tax levy, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 51. That the Town transfer the sum of $710,000 as specified in the article. 



48 



5/2/2001. Majority vote. 



ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the amount of $10,000, by 

borrowing or otherwise, to continue the Administration Building historical building restoration 
design and planning process, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Public Works and the Historical Commission 

Voted Article 52. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
5/2/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the amount of $10,000, by 

borrowing or otherwise, to begin the Fish House historical building restoration design and planning 
process, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Public Works and the Historical Commission 

Voted Article 53. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
5/2/2001. Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise, by borrowing or 

otherwise, under any general or special law which authorizes the Town to raise money, by 
borrowing or otherwise, such sums of money as may be necessary for any and all of the purpose 
mentioned in the foregoing articles. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 54. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

5/2/2001. Majority vote. 

Town of Swampscott 
Special Town Meeting Warrant 
October 15, 2001 

Return of Service: 

Pursuant to the within warrant to be directed, I have notified the inhabitants of the Town of 
Swampscott qualified to vote in elections and in Town affairs by posting an attested copy thereof at 
the Town Administration Building, at the Post Office, and at least two public and conspicuous 
places in each precinct in the town, and at or in the immediate vicinity of the Swampscott Railroad 
Station. Said posting was done on September 28. 2001. and no less than 14 days before the date 
appointed for said meeting. 



49 



Attest: Paul Minsky 
Constable of Swampscott 

Mailing of Warrant: 

The Warrants for the Special Town Meeting were mailed to Town Meeting members on 
September 28, 2001. Copies of the Warrant were also available, free of charge, for any interested 
person at the Town Administration Building. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2001, 7:15 P.M. 

To the Town Meeting members: 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article I. Section 2, of the Bylaws of the Town 
of Swampscott that a Special Town Meeting will be held on Monday, October 15, 2001. beginning 
at 7:15 p.m. in the auditorium of the Swampscott Middle School on Greenwood Avenue. 

Meeting certifications: 

I hereby certify that the Special Town Meeting of October 15, 2001 was held at the 
Swampscott Middle School auditorium on Greenwood Avenue and was called to order at 7:20 p.m. 
with the necessary quorum being present (240). At 10:28 p.m. is was voted to adjourn to October 
16. 2001. 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of October 15, 2001. the 
Adjourned Special Town Meeting of October 15, 2001 was held at the Swampscott Middle School 
auditorium on Greenwood Avenue and was called to order at 7:27 p.m. with the necessary quorum 
being present (210). At 10:52 p.m. it was voted to dissolve the Special Town Meeting. 

TOWN MEETING ACTION 

After the Return of Service was read by Town Clerk Jack L. Paster, Reverend Dean 
Pederson of the First Church in Swampscott. Congregational, offered the invocation. 



ACTION UNDER THE ARTICLES 



ARTICLE 1 . To hear and act on the reports of Town Officials, Boards and Committees. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 1 . That comments offered by Carole Shutzer, chairman of the Board of Selectmen, 
recognizing the efforts of Swampscott resident Edward Seligman who worked tirelessly in the 



50 



rescue effort at the World Trade Center in New York City following the September 1 1 , 2001 acts 
of terrorism be accepted. 

That the report of Moderator Martin C. Goldman on the Swampscott sesquicentennial celebration 
be accepted. 



10/15/2001 
Majority vote. 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, by 

borrowing or otherwise, for the following projects, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Capital Improvements Committee 

Project Appropriation 

Police Department 40,000 
New Heating System 



Department of Public Works 

Phillips Park Parking Lot Paving 



100,000 



School Department 

Replace Exterior doors and windows 
Suspended Ceiling Replacement 
Window Shades 



110,000 
70,000 
50,000 



Recreation Department 

Addition to Field House at Phillips Park 



30,000 



Council on Aging 
General Repairs 



25,000 



Library 

Replacement Palladian windows 



70,000 



Selectmen 

Installing Traffic Signal at Burpee Road 



20,000 



Accountant 

Network Town Hall, Police, Fire, Library, Senior Center, 
Town Hall Annex, High School backbone 



194,000 



51 



TOTAL 



$709,000 



Voted Article 2. That the Town appropriate the sum of 
$709,000 for the purposes specified in the Article; that 
each item be considered a separate appropriation; that the 
budgeted amount may only be spent for the stated 
purpose; further, that the Town Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, be authorized to borrow this 
amount through the issuance of bonds or notes under the 
appropriate section of the Massachusetts General Laws, 
and that the Treasurer be authorized to combine the 
borrowing with any other borrowing authorized by Town 
Meeting. 



10/15/2001 
Unanimous vote. 



Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, by borrowi 
otherwise, for the following projects, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Capital Improvements Committee. 

Project Appropriation 

Department of Public Works 

Fish House Repair $100,000 
Administration Building parking lot paving 25,000 



Selectmen 

Burpee Terrace drainage 



250,000 



Department of Public Works 
Ingraham Terrace 



100,000 



Accountant 

Acquire MUNIS System license to tie in school payroll 
and billing 



100,000 



52 



TOTAL 



$575,000 



Voted Article 3. That action on this Article be postponed indefinitely. 

10/15/2001 
Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management 

and control of the land owned by the Town upon which the Swampscott Town Hall is located, 
described in a deed recorded with the Essex South District Registry of deeds at Book 3371, 
Page 21 1, to the Board of Selectmen for the purpose of granting an historic preservation 
restriction and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to grant an historic preservation restriction 
in accordance with the provisions of M.G.L. c.l84, § 31-34 to the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts through the Massachusetts Historical Commission, upon such terms and 
conditions as the Board of Selectmen shall determine to be appropriate, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen and the Historical Commission 



Voted Article 4. That this Article be approved. 

Unanimous Vote. 
10/15/2001 



ARTICLE 5. To see what action the Town will take in relation to the salanes of the 

Town Clerk-Collector and the Treasurer for Fiscal Year 2002, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Sponsored by Town Clerk-Collector and Treasurer Jack L. Paster 

Voted Article 5. That action on this Article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
10/16/2001 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to petition the General Court to enact special 
legislation amending the Charter of the Town of Swampscott in the 
form set forth below, provided, however, that the General Court 
may make clerical or editorial changes of form only to the bill, 



53 



unless the Board of Selectmen approve amendments to the bill 
before enactment by the General Court, and authorizing the Board 
of Selectmen to approve amendments which shall be within the 
scope of the general public objectives of the petition: 

An Act Relative to the Charter of the Town of 

Swampscott 

Section 1. Notwithstanding the provisions of General 
Law Chapter 41, Section IB, or any other general or special law 
to the contrary, the Charter of the Town of Swampscott, adopted 
pursuant to G.L. c. 43B, with an effective date of July 1, 1969, 
and including any amendments made thereto, is amended by 
inserting, after Chapter 6 of the Charter, the following new 
chapters : 

Chapter 7 
Board of Selectmen 

SECTION 7-1: Duties 

a) Powers and Duties in General - The board of selectmen shall 
serve as the chief policy making agency of the town and shall be 
responsible for the formulation and promulgation of policy directives and 
guidelines to be followed by all town agencies serving under it. The board 
of selectmen shall also be responsible for development and promulgation of 
policy guidelines for elected town officers and multiple member bodies not 
serving under the Board, in conjunction with those officers and bodies. 

b) Licensing Authority - The board of selectmen shall be the 
licensing board for the town and shall have power to issue licenses in 
accordance with the provisions of the General Laws and town by-laws. 

c) Appointment - The board of selectmen shall appoint a town 
administrator, individuals who are to serve as representatives or delegates 
of the town to the governing or advisory boards of regional or district 
authorities, and such other town officials and members of multiple member 
bodies as provided for in Chapter 14 of the Charter. 

d) Investigations - The board of selectmen may make, or may 
authorize the town administrator to make, investigations into the affairs of 
the town and the conduct of any town agency. The report of the results of 
such investigation shall be placed on file in the office of the board of 
selectmen and a report summarizing the results of such investigation shall 
be printed in the next annual town report. 

e) Contracts - The board of selectmen shall be the signatory 
authority for all contracts within its jurisdiction as provided for in the 
General Laws, town by-laws, by vote of Town Meeting, or otherwise. 



Chapter 8 
Town Administrator 



54 



SECTION 8-1: Appointment; Qualifications; Term 



CO 

a 



a. 



The board of selectmen shall appoint a town administrator from a 
list prepared by a screening committee. The board of selectmen shall ^ 
appoint the town administrator to serve for a renewable contract not to ^ 
exceed five years and shall fix the compensation for such person annually 2 
within the amount appropriated by town meeting. The town administrator shall □ 
be appointed solely on the basis of demonstrated executive and y 
administrative qualifications. The town administrator shall be a person 
especially fitted by education, training and previous experience in public 
and/or business administration to perform the duties of the office. A town 
administrator need not be a resident of the town. The town administrator O 
shall not have served in an elective office in the town of Swampscott v) 
government for at least twelve (12) months prior to appointment, with the 
exception of town meeting member. The members of the 2001 Town Government 
Study Committee shall not be eligible for appointment as the first 
Swampscott Town Administrator. 

The town administrator shall devote full time to the office and 
shall not hold any other public office, elective or appointive, nor engage 
in any other business or occupation during such service, unless such action 
is approved in advance and in writing by the board of selectmen. 

The board of selectmen shall provide for a semi-annual review of the 
job performance of the town administrator in the first year and 
annually thereafter, which shall, at least in summary form be a public 
record. The town administrator's review would be a public record subject to 
mandatory disclosure. 

Any vacancy in the office of the .town administrator shall be filled 
as soon as possible by the board of selectmen, and in the interim they shall 
appoint a qualified town administrative officer or employee to serve as a 
temporary town administrator to perform the duties of the office. Such 
temporary appointment may not exceed three (3) months, but one renewal may 
be voted by the board of selectman to extend for a second three (3) months. 
Compensation for such person shall be set by the board of selectmen. 



SECTION 8-2: Powers and Duties 



The town administrator shall be the chief administrative and 
financial officer of the town, directly responsible to the board of 
selectmen for the administration of all town affairs not specifically 
reserved to another elected body. The powers and duties of the town 
administrator shall include, but are not intended to be limited to, the 
fol lowing : 

a) To supervise, direct and be responsible for the efficient 
administration of all functions and activities for which the office of town 
administrator is given authority, responsibility or control by the town 
charter, by-laws, by town meeting vote, by vote of the board of selectmen, 
or otherwise. 



b) To recommend for appointment 
remove and/or discipline subject to the 
any collective bargaining agreements as 
heads, officials and employees for whom 
discipline is provided. Such recommenda 



and in appropriate circumstances to 
provisions of civil service law and 
may be applicable, all department 
no other method of selection or 
ions for appointments and/or 



55 



removals become effective upon approval of the majority of the Board of 
Selectmen based upon the recommendation of the Town Administrator. 

c) To be entrusted with the administration of a town personnel 
system, exclusive of the school department, including but not limited to 
personnel policies and practices, rules and regulations, including 
provisions for an annual employee performance review, personnel by-law and 
collective bargaining agreements entered into by the town. The town 
administrator shall also prepare and keep current a plan establishing the 
personnel staffing requirements for each town department. 

d) To attend all regular and special meetings of the Board of 
Selectmen, and other meetings deemed appropriate by the Board of Selectmen 
unless unavailable for reasonable cause, and shall have a voice, but not 
vote, in all of its proceedings. 

e) To assure that full and complete records of the financial and 
administrative activities of the town are kept and to render as often as may 
be required by the board of selectmen, but not less than once in each year, 

a full report of all town financial and administrative operations during the 
period reported on, which report shall be made available to the public. 

f) To keep the board of selectmen fully advised as to the needs of 
the town and shall recommend to the board of selectmen and to other elected 
town officers and agencies for adoption such measures requiring action by 
them or by the town meeting as the town administrator may deem necessary or 
expedient . 

g) To have full jurisdiction over the rental and use of all town 
facilities and property except school property. The town administrator shall 
be responsible for the maintenance and repair of all town buildings and 
facilities placed under the town administrator's control by by-law or by 
vote of the town or otherwise. 

h) To prepare and present each year a balanced annual operating 
budget for the town and a proposed capital outlay program for the five 
fiscal years next ensuing in accordance with existing by-laws. 

i) To assure that an inventory of property of the town, both real 
and personal, is kept, including property within the jurisdiction of the 
school committee, in accordance with generally accepted government 
accounting principles. 

j) To negotiate all contracts involving any subject within the 
jurisdiction of the office of town administrator, including contracts with 
town employees, except employees of the school department, involving wages, 
hours and other terms and conditions of employment. 

k) To be responsible for purchasing all supplies, material, and 
equipment for all departments and activities of the town, but not including 
food for schools, school books, and other instructional material, supplies 
and equipment, unless otherwise specifically requested by the school 
committee. The town administrator shall examine, or cause to be examined, 
the quantity, quality and condition of all supplies, material and equipment 
delivered to or received by any town department, except schools. The town 
administrator shall be responsible for the disposal of all supplies, 
material and equipment which have been declared surplus by any town agency. 



56 



The town administrator, or his or her designee, shall be the chief 
procurement officer for the town. 



1) To see that all of the provisions of the general laws, the 
town's charter and by-laws and other votes of the town meeting, and votes of X. 
the board of selectmen, or other elected boards that the town 5 
administrator has operational jurisdiction over, which require enforcement S 
by the town administrator or other officials subject to the direction and y 
supervision of the town administrator are faithfully executed, performed or 
otherwise carried out . 



CO 



m) To inquire, at any time, into the conduct of office or q 

performance of duties of any official or employee, department, board, ^ 

commission or other town agency, excluding schools. ^ 

n) To attend all sessions of all town meetings and answer all > 
questions raised by voters which relate to warrant articles and to matters 
over which the town administrator exercises any supervision. 



o) To recommend to the board of selectmen, who are granted the 
authority to make such changes upon majority vote, the reorganization, 
consolidation or abolishment of town departments or agencies serving under 
the supervision of the town administrator, in whole, or in part, provide for 
new departments or agencies, and/or providing and/or to recommend providing, 
for a reassignment of powers, duties and responsibilities among such 
departments or agencies so established or existing. 

p) To coordinate the activities of all town departments or agencies 
serving under the office of the town administrator and the office of the 
board of selectman with those under the control of other officials and 
multiple member bodies elected directly by the voters. For this purpose, the 
town administrator shall have authority to require the persons so elected or 
their representatives, to meet with the town administrator at reasonable 
times, for the purpose of effecting coordination and cooperation among all 
departments or agencies of the town. 

q) To perform any other duties as are required to be performed by 
the town administrator by by-laws, administrative code, votes of the town 
meeting, or votes of the board of selectmen, or otherwise. 



SECTION 8-3: Acting Town Administrator 



a) Temporary absence - By letter filed with the town clerk, the 
town administrator shall recommend a qualified town administrative officer 
or employee who, with the approval of the board of selectmen, shall exercise 
the powers and perform the duties of town administrator during a temporary 
absence. During a temporary absence the board of selectmen may not revoke 
such designation until at least ten (10) working days have elapsed, 
whereupon it may appoint another qualified town administrative officer or 
employee to serve until the town administrator shall return. 

b) Vacancy - Any vacancy in the office of town administrator shall 
be filled as soon as possible by the board of selectmen, but, pending such 
regular appointment the board of selectmen shall appoint a qualified town 
administrative officer or employee to perform the duties of the office on an 
acting basis. 



57 



c) Powers and Duties - The powers of a temporary or acting town 
administrator under (a) and (b) above shall be limited to matters not 
admitting of delay and shall include authority to make temporary, emergency 
appointments or designations to town office or employment but not to make 
permanent appointments or designations. 

SECTION 8-4: Removal and Suspension 

The board of selectmen may, by a minimum vote of four of its 
members, terminate and remove, or suspend, the town administrator from 
office in accordance with the following procedure: 

a) The board of selectman shall adopt a preliminary resolution of 
removal by a minimum vote of four of its members which must state the reason 
or reasons for removal . This preliminary resolution may suspend the town 
administrator for a period not to exceed forty-five (45) days. A copy of the 
resolution shall be delivered in hand or by certified mail, return receipt 
requested, to the town administrator. 

b) Within five (5) days after receipt of the preliminary resolution 
the town administrator may request a public hearing by filing a written 
request for such a hearing with the board of selectmen. This hearing shall 
be held at a meeting of the board of selectmen not later than thirty (30) 
days after the request is filed nor earlier than twenty (20) days. The town 
administrator may file a written statement responding to the reasons stated 
in the resolution of removal with the board of selectmen provided the same 
is received at its office more than forty-eight (48) hours in advance of the 
public hearing. 

c) The board of selectman may adopt a final resolution of removal, 
which may be made effective immediately, by the affirmative vote of at least 
four of its members not less than ten (10) nor more than twenty-one (21) 
days following the delivery of the preliminary resolution to the town 
administrator, if the town administrator has not requested a public hearing; 
or within ten (10) days following the close of the public hearing if the 
town administrator has requested one. Failure to adopt a final resolution of 
removal within the time periods as provided in this section shall nullify 
the preliminary resolution of removal and the administrator shall, at the 
expiration of said time, forthwith resume duties of the office. The town 
administrator will continue to receive full pay and benefits until the 
adoption of a final resolution by the board of selectmen. 

The action of the board of selectmen in suspending or removing the 
town administrator shall be final, it being the intention of this provision 
to vest all authority and fix all responsibility for such suspension or 
removal in the board of selectmen. 



Chapter 9 
Finance and Fiscal Procedures 

SECTION 9-1: Fiscal Year 

The fiscal year of the town shall begin on the first day of July and 
shall end on the last day of June, unless another period is required by 
general law. 



58 



SECTION 9-2: School Committee Budget 



Submission to Town Administrator - The budget for the ensuing ^ 

fiscal year as adopted by the school committee shall be submitted to the ^ 

town administrator in sufficient time, but no later than February 15, to X 

enable the town administrator to consider the effect of the school ^ 

department's requested appropriation upon the total town operating budget O 

which is required to be submitted under this chapter. ^ 

SECTION 9-3: Submission of Budget and Budget Summary ^ 

O 

Within the time fixed by by-law, before the town meeting is to 
convene, the town administrator, after consultation with the board of ^ 
selectmen, shall submit to the board of selectmen a proposed town operating cc 
budget for the ensuing fiscal year with an accompanying budget summary and ^ 
supporting analysis. The proposed operating budget, summary and supporting 
analysis shall be based, in part, on annual departmental appropriation 
requests received by the town administrator, who shall provide copies of the 
same, within seven days of receipt, to the finance committee. Complete 
copies of the proposed operating budget shall be available for examination 
by the public. The board of selectmen shall by a majority vote approve a 
balanced budget and submit said budget to the finance committee no later 
than the first day of March for the ensuing fiscal year. 

SECTION 9-4: Budget Summary 

The budget summary prepared by the town administrator shall explain 
the budget for all town departments both in fiscal terms and in terms of 
work programs. It shall describe important , features of the budget, indicate 
any major variations from the current year in financial policies, 
expenditures and revenues together with the reasons for such variations, 
summarize the town's debt position and include other materials as the town 
administrator deems desirable, or the board of selectman may reasonably 
require . 

SECTION 9-5: The Budget 

The proposed operating budget shall provide a complete financial 
plan for all town funds and activities for the ensuing fiscal year. The 
budget shall include supplemental information showing in detail all 
estimated income from the proposed property tax levy and other sources and 
all proposed expenditures, including debt service, for the following year. 
Supplemental information shall be arranged to show the actual and estimated 
income and expenditures for the previous, current and ensuing fiscal years 
and shall indicate in separate sections: 

a) Proposed expenditures for current and new operations during the 
ensuing fiscal year, detailed by town department and position in terms of 
work programs, and the method of financing such expenditures. 

b) Proposed capital expenditures for current operations during the 
ensuing fiscal year, detailed by town department, and the proposed methods 
of financing each such capital expenditure; and 

c) Estimated surplus revenue and free cash at the end of the 



59 



current fiscal year, as well as estimated balances in any special accounts 
established for specific purposes. 

SECTION 9-6: Action on the Budget 

a) Action by Town Meeting - Upon receipt of the proposed operating 
budget approved by the selectmen, the finance committee may review, 
investigate or and/or amend the proposal as it deems necessary and 
appropriate. The finance committee budget proposal, as amended, shall be 
placed before town meeting for its approval, subject to further amendments 
from the floor. Supplemental budget information including, but not limited 
to, the budget summary, income and expense projections, program descriptions 
shall also be available to town meeting for its approval. Supplemental 
budget information is not subject to town meeting approval. 

SECTION 9-7: Capital Improvement Program 

The capital improvement committee shall recommend a capital 
improvement program to the town administrator by February 1, including: 

a) a clear and concise summary of its contents; 

b) proposed capital expenditures for the ensuing year; 

c) a five year capital improvement plan with supporting information 
as to the need, cost and method of financing for each projected capital 
expenditure . 

The town administrator shall serve as an ex-officio non-voting 
member of the capital improvement committee, providing technical assistance 
when necessary. 

SECTION 9-8: Approval of Warrants 

The town administrator shall be the chief fiscal officer of the 
town. Warrants for the payment of town funds prepared by the town 
accountant in accordance with the provisions of the general laws shall be 
submitted to the town administrator. The approval of any such warrant by the 
town administrator shall authorize payment by the town treasurer, but the 
board of selectmen shall approve all warrants in the event of the absence of 
the town administrator or a vacancy in the office of town administrator. 

SECTION 9-9: Annual Financial Forecast 

The town administrator shall report to the board of selectmen, 
finance committee, and the school committee no later than November 15 
each year and present a financial forecast for the next fiscal year 
detailing anticipated revenues, transfers and expenditures. 

SECTION 9-10: Five-Year Budget Plan 

The town administrator shall submit as supplemental information to 
town meeting a five-year budget plan detailing anticipated revenues and 
expenditures . 

Chapter 10 



60 



Transitional Provisions 



SECTION 10-1: Time of Taking Effect ^ 

IX 

a) Screening Committee - Forthwith following the election at which X 

this change is adopted, a screening committee shall be established for the ^ 

purpose of soliciting, receiving, and evaluating applications for the O 

position of town administrator. ^ 

0. 

The screening committee shall consist of five (5) persons who shall >- 

be chosen as follows: one member or designee of the board of selectmen, the O 
school committee, the finance committee, and two elected town meeting 

members appointed by the town moderator. Persons designated by the said ^ 

agencies may, but need not, be members of the agency by which they are < 

designated. Appointments made by the town moderator shall be made last in ^ 
time in order that in making appointments the moderator may, insofar as it 
may be feasible so to do, appoint persons who will broaden the membership 
base of the committee to be most representative of the demographic and 
occupational base of the town. 



Not more than thirty (30) days following the election at which this 
is adopted, the several persons chosen as aforesaid shall meet to organize 
and to plan a process to advertise the vacancy and to solicit by other means 
candidates for the office. The committee shall proceed notwithstanding the 
failure of any town agency to designate its representatives. 

The screening committee shall review all applications received by 
it, screen all applicants by checking and verifying work records and 
other credentials, and interview such number of candidates as it deems 
necessary, desirable or expedient. If, in the sole judgment of the screening 
committee, there are no candidates deemed acceptable then the screening 
committee shall report to the board of selectmen and request that the 
advertising and solicitation process be reinstituted. 



Not more than ninety (90) days following the date on which the 
committee meets to organize, the committee shall submit to the board of 
selectmen the names of not less than three (3) and not more than five 
(5)persons whom it believes to be best suited to perform the duties of the 
office of town administrator. The selectmen may, upon a majority vote of the 
screening committee, grant an extension to the 90 day period, said extension 
not to exceed 30 days. The board of selectmen may only grant two 30-day 
extensions . 



Within thirty (30) days following the date the list of nominees is 
submitted to it, the Board of Selectmen shall choose, by the affirmative 
vote of at least three of its members, one of the said nominees to serve as 
town administrator. If the Board of Selectmen does not select one of these 
finalists, the process shall commence again beginning with the advertising 
of a vacancy and solicitation of candidates. 



Upon the appointment of a town administrator the committee 
established hereunder shall be considered discharged. 

Until such time as some other provision is made by by-law for 
another screening committee, a committee as above shall be established 
whenever the office of town administrator shall become vacant. 



61 



I 



b) Town Administrator Qualifications - Until such time as the town 
meeting may act, by by-law, to establish different qualifications for the 
office, the town administrator shall have the following specific 
qualifications : 

1) have at least a Master's degree from a recognized, accredited 
college or university. Such degree shall be in a relevant discipline. Three 
additional years of experience as defined in Section lO-l-b-2 and a 
Bachelor's degree from a recognized, accredited college or university may 
also meet the minimum educational requirements for this position; 

2) have preferably served full time as an administrative officer of 
a city or town for not less than three (3) years, or have demonstrated 
executive, management and administrative qualifications and be fitted by 
education, training and previous experience in the public or private sector. 

SECTION 10-2: Board of Public Works 

a) The elected board of public works shall be eliminated and the 
terms of the elected members of the board shall cease upon acceptance of 
this charter amendment by the voters. 

b) There shall be a department of public works with a 
superintendent of public works serving as department head. The board of 
selectmen shall be responsible for establishing and setting policy with 
regard to public works matters. 

c) There shall be a three (3) person Board of Public Works, 
appointed by the Selectmen. The duties, responsibilities and authority of 
this Board shall be established by the Selectmen. 

SECTION 10-3: Town Treasurer/Collector/Clerk 

a) The term of the elected incumbent of the offices of the town 
treasurer/collector/clerk shall terminate at the time this charter 
amendment is adopted by the voters, however, at that time such incumbent 
shall be deemed to have been appointed to the combined appointed 
treasurer/collector/clerk position through June 30, 2004. The first 
appointee to the position of treasurer/collector /clerk shall receive the 
salaries of the existing fiscal year (FY 02) appropriation for the elected 
positions of treasurer/collector/clerk and such other amount as town Meeting 
may appropriate therefore. 

Chapter 11 

Board of Assessors 

SECTION 11-1: Composition, Term of Office 

There shall be an elected board of assessors consisting of three 
members, for terms of three years each, so arranged so that the term of 
office of one member shall expire each year. 

SECTION 11-2: Powers and Duties 



62 



The elected board of assessors shall annually make a valuation of 
all property, both real and personal within the town. It shall have all the 
powers and duties given to a board of assessors under the constitution and ^ 
general laws of the Commonwealth, and such addition of powers and duties as 
may be authorized by the charter, by by-law or by other town meeting vote. 2C 

3D 

In addition, the board of assessors may advise the assessing department, 

when warranted, on all other matters. O 

SECTION 11-3: Appointment of Full- or Part-Time Assistant Assessors 

Full- or part-time assistant assessors shall be appointed in the O 
following manner: The board of assessors shall serve as a screening to 
committee. The board of assessors shall review all applications received by ^ 
it, screen all such applications by checking and verifying work records and < 
other credentials of the applicants. The board of assessors shall recommend ^ 
not less than two applicants to the town administrator for appointment. The 
town administrator shall recommend and the board of selectmen shall appoint 
from among the applicants recommended by the board of assessors the position 
of full or part-time assistant assessors. 

Chapter 12 
Board of Health 



SECTION 12-1: Composition, Term of Office 



There shall be an elected board of, health consisting of three 
members for terms of three years each, so arranged that the term of office 
of one member shall expire each year. 



SECTION 12-2: Powers and Duties 



The board of health shall be responsible for advising the town 
administrator and board of selectmen on all aspects relating to health 
issues. The board of health shall have all the powers and duties given to a 
board of health under the constitution and general laws of the 
Commonwealth, and such addition of powers and duties as may be authorized by 
the charter, by by-law or by other town meeting vote. In addition, the board 
of health may advise the health department, when warranted, on all other 
matters . 



SECTION 12-3: Appointment of Health Agent 



The health agent shall be a person especially fitted by education, 
training, or previous experience to perform the duties of the office. The 
health agent shall be appointed in the following manner: The elected board 
of health shall serve as a screening committee. The board of health shall 
review all applications received by it, screen all such applications by 
checking and verifying work records and other credentials of the applicants. 
The board of health shall recommend not less than two applicants to the town 
administrator for appointment. The town administrator shall recommend and 
the board of selectmen shall appoint from among the applicants recommended 
by the board of health the position of health agent. 



63 



Chapter 13 
Library Trustees 

SECTION 13-1: Composition, Term of Office 

There shall be an elected board of library trustees consisting of 
three members, for terms of three years each, so arranged so that the term 
of office of one member shall expire each year. In addition, the board of 
library trustees may advise the library department, when warranted, on all 
other matters. 

SECTION 13-2: Powers and Duties 

The library trustees shall have all the powers and duties given to a 
board of library trustees under the constitution and general laws of the 
Commonwealth, and such addition of powers and duties as may be authorized by 
the charter, by by-law or by other town meeting vote. 

SECTION 13-3: Appointment of Head Librarian 

The head librarian shall be appointed in the following manner: The 
elected board of library trustees shall serve as a screening committee. The 
board of library trustees shall review all applications received by it, 
screen all such applications by checking and verifying work records and 
other credentials of the applicants. The board of library trustees shall 
recommend not less than two applicants to the town administrator for 
appointment. The town administrator shall recommend and the board of 
selectmen shall appoint from among the applicants recommended by the library 
trustees the position of head librarian. 



Chapter 14 

Appointment Summary 

SECTION 14-1: The board of selectmen shall have the right to appoint the 
fol lowing : 

town administrator; 

conservation commission to consist of seven members appointed for terms of 
three years each; 

zoning board of appeals to consist of five regular members, appointed for 
terms of five years each, and two associate members, appointed for terms of 
two years each; 

council on aging, as provided by by-law; 
cable television oversight committee; 
constables ; 



64 



arts lottery council; 
Swampscott Historical Commission; 
building code board of appeals; 
harbor advisory board; 
recreation commission; 
an affirmative action committee; 
4th of July committee; 
Veteran's Day committee; 
Memorial Day committee; 

War Memorial Scholarship Fund committee; 
an election commission; 

and any other committee not referred to in this charter and which town 
meeting and/or the board of selectmen deem appropriate. 

SECTION 14-2: The town administrator shall recommend and the board of 
selectmen shall appoint from among the applicants recommended by the town 
administrator, the following: 

superintendent of public works and all other employees of a department of 
public works; 

police chief and all other employees of the police department; 
fire chief and all other employees of the fire department; 
town accountant and all other employees of that office; 
inspector of buildings and all other employees of that office; 
wire inspector and all other employees of that office; 

inspector of gas appliances and gas fittings and all other employees of 
that office; 

plumbing inspector and all other employees of that office; 

animal control officer and all other employees of that office; 

sealer of weights and measures and all other employees of that office; 

parking clerk and all other employees of that office; 

town counsel and all other employees of that office; 

town engineer and all other employees of that office; 



65 



tree warden and all other employees of that office; 

veteran's services director, veteran's agent, veteran's graves officer and 
burial agent and all other employees of that office; 

health agent, animal inspector and other personnel of the department of 
health and all other employees of that office; 

town treasurer/collector/clerk and all other employees of that office; 

civil defense director and related civil defense personnel and all other 
employees of that office; 

full or part-time assistant assessors and all other employees of that 
office ; 

head librarian and all other employees of that office; 
the harbor master and all other employees of that office; 
and any other non-school employees not previously addressed. 

Chapter 15 

Annual Town Meeting Date 

Section 15-1 Annual Town Meeting 

The annual town meeting shall commence on the third Monday of May 
each year . 

Chapter 16 

Continuation of Government 

SECTION 16-1 Continuation of Government 

All town agencies shall continue to perform their duties until 
reappointed, reelected or until successors to their respective positions are 
duly appointed or elected, or their duties have been transferred and assumed 
by another town agency in accordance with the provisions of this charter. 

EFFECTIVE DATE: The effective date of this amendment will be July 1, 2002. 

Chapter 17 
Review Committee to be appointed 

SECTION 17-1 Review Committee to be appointed 

The town moderator shall appoint a committee consisting of one 



66 



member of each of six precincts and one member at large which shall prepare 

a report to be presented at the annual town meeting four (4) years after the 

enactment of these articles of amendment to the town charter. The review 

committee will have the power to make any recommendations deemed necessary >- 

in the interest of good town government. 5 

X 

Section 2. This Act shall be presented to the voters of the Town for ^ 

acceptance at a regular or special Town Election. The Board of Selectmen f: 

shall place the following binding question on the ballot: a 

Shall an act passed by the General Court entitled, "An Act g 

Relative to the Charter of the Town of Swampscott" be accepted? W 

S 

If a majority of the votes cast in answer to said question is in ^ 

the affirmative, Section 1 of this act shall thereafter take full effect, tn 
but not otherwise. 



Voted Article 6. That this article be approved. 



Majority Vote. 
10/16/2001 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise, by borrowing or 

otherwise, under any general or special law which authorizes the Town to raise money, by 
borrowing or otherwise, such sums of money as may be necessary for any and all of the 
purposes mentioned in the foregoing articles. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 7. That action on this Article be postponed indefinitely. 



Majority Vote. 
10/16/2001 



67 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT TOWN MEETING MEMBERSHIP - 2001 



Pre 


Name 


April 30 


May 1 


May 2 


Oct. 1 5 


Oct. 16 


1 


Addis, Arlene 


X 


X 


X 


o 





1 


Addis, David 


X 





X 










Alpert, Julius H. 

















1 


Baldacci, Richard 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Barbuzzi, Pamela A. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Batchelder, Kathleen M. 


X 


o 


o 





X 


1 


Bates, Wallace T. 


X 


X 


X 


X 





1 


Bickford. Barbara 


X 


X 


X 








1 


Blonder, Cindy M. 





X 


X 


X 





1 


Blonder, Jeffrey S. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Brenner, Lawrence 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Caruso, Laurie 


o 





o 





o 


1 


Chouinard, Madeline 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Cresta, Gino A. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Cropley, John H. Jr. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Daley, John R. 


X 


o 


o 








1 


Dandreo, Robert 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


DiLisio, Vincent R. 


o 


o 


o 








1 


Dorgan, Denise 


X 


o 





X 





1 


Feinberg, Helen 1. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Finlay, Patricia 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Gambale, Eve 


X 


X 


X 








1 


Genest, Lee Bartlett 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Hoffman, Dana A. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Hyde, Sally 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Hyde, William R. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


ludice, Michael A. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Jaeger, Robert C. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Johnson, Maryalice 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Kaloust, Gerald 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Kaloust, Roberta 


X 


o 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Kearney, Sheila P. 


X 





X 





X 


1 


Kessler, Nelson 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Leger, J. Arthur 





X 





X 


X 


1 


Maher, William 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Marrs, Mary Regan 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Mayo, Catherine 


X 


X 


X 


X 


o 


1 


Mcintosh, Richard T. 





X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Mitchell, Bernice 


X 


X 


X 








1 


Mitchell, Stacy 


X 


X 


X 








1 


Montague, Neil 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Patrikis, Theodore A. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Perry, Robert E. 


X 


X 











1 


Picariello, John 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Picariello, Lawrence 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Rosen, Myriam 


X 


X 


X 


X 





1 


Shannon, Cynthia Collins 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Shapiro, Barbara R. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Shiloh, Naomi 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Speranza, Frances M. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 


Speranza-Hartmann, Marianne 


o 


X 





X 


X 


1 


Speropoulos, Cynthia 


o 


X 


X 


X 







Whelton, Linda 


o 
















Whittier, Douglas 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 



68 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT TOWN MEETING MEMBERSHIP - 200 



Pre 


Name 


April 30 


May 1 


May 2 


Oct. 15 


Oct. 16 


2 


Barden, Eugene 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Bartlett, Lorraine M. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Best, Mary E. 


X 


X 





X 


X 


2 


Bowen, David 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Breen, Kevin 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Breen, Leslie 


X 


X 


X 


X 





2 


Brown, Mary Lisa 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Cameron, Janell A. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Cassidy, Tim 


X 


X 


X 


X 


o 


2 


Coletti, John 





X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Costin, Timothy 


X 


X 





X 


o 


2 


DeFelice, Nicolas 


X 


X 











2 


Doherty, Daniel E. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Doherty, John J. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Fagone, John II 


X 


X 


X 


X 


o 


2 


Fagone, Kirsten 


X 


X 


X 


X 


o 


2 


Foye, David 


O 








X 


X 


2 


Hebert, Donald 


X 





X 


X 





2 


Hebert, Janet 


X 


X 





X 





2 


Hitchcock, Sarah 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Howard, Alice C 


O 


X 


X 





o 


2 


Jackson, Lorene 


X 


X 





X 


X 


2 


Kyriakakis, Carole 


O 


X 











2 


LaConte, Louise 


X 


X 


X 





X 


2 


LaConte, Vincent 


X 


X 


X 


o 


X 


2 


LeClerc, Amanda 








X 


X 


X 


2 


LeClerc, Susan R. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Lyons, Wendy 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Magee, Kathleen 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Marcou, Martha 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


McHugh, Marc G. 


X 


X 











2 


McHugh, Terri G. 


X 


X 





X 


o 


2 


Murphy, Brian 


X 


X 








o 


2 


Newhall, Linda A. 


X 


X 





X 


X 


2 


Newhall, Walter E. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Palleschi, Edward 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


O 

£_ 


Paster, Jack L. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Ramstine, Patricia Karamas 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Reardon, Ellen 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Richmond, David 


X 


X 


X 


X 





2 


Romano, John 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Rubin, Debra 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Sachs-Freeman, Barbara 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Sainato, Mary Ann 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Schultz, W. Jackson Jr. 


X 


X 


X 


X 





2 


Shanahan, Joseph Jr. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Shutzer, Carole B 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Shutzer, Kenneth B 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Strauss, Danielle 


X 


X 


X 





o 


2 


Strauss, Matthew W. 


X 


X 


X 


o 





2 


Thomsen, Maureen 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


2 


Voyer, Thomas 


X 


X 





X 


X 


2 


Whelan, David 


X 


o 





o 


o 


2 


Wright. Suzanne 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 



69 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT TOWN MEETING MEMBERSHIP - 200 



Pro 
lie 


INarilc 


/April OU 


May 1 


^y| o\ / o 
iviay 


KJCl. \ O 


uci. 1 o 


vJ 


t3 ^ r/^ £ri ^ /1 1 ^ Q 1 1 

tsaruen, iviicneiie 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 




o 
o 


DcllllfcJU, ndipii t II 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


O 


Dirt-iiiTior K, oaiiy 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Q 
vJ 


Drdydii, iviary 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


w 


O 
O 


DULllaliari oUSdll 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 




odrTipUcll, IVIiODdei o. 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


O 


oaruenas, raincia 


Y 
A 


C\ 

KJ 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


O 


L/dssiuy, jurin n 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


KJ 


KJ 


Q 
O 


uanareo, uaniei iii 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


O 


uavis, iviurray 


r\ 
\J 


KJ 


KJ 


KJ 


KJ 


Q 
O 


uonanue, Linaa Dray 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


KJ 




Q 
O 


uonneiiy, noDen j. 


w 


KJ 


KJ 


KJ 




O 
O 


uooian, James c 


Y 
A 


Y 

A 


Y 

A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Q 
O 


uriscoii-rieius, AAnne 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 

A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Q 
O 


tiuriuge, DarDara 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


KJ 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


O 


ruznenry, vjeorge 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


KJ 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


O 


rrazer, uana 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


KJ 


n 


O 


oeraci, ueura 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Q 

O 


(jiiDerg, nicnara a. 


n 


n 
(J 


KJ 


KJ 




O 


narrinyion, vera o 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


KJ 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


O 


neaiey, iviary uoneny 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


KJ 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Q 
O 


ncalcJy, 1 fiurilao III 


Y 
A 


Y 

A 


Y 

A 


Y 
A 




O 

O 


noiriico, Dcuy 


Y 

A 


Y 
A 


Y 

A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Q 
O 


nuDauer, iviary Dein 


n 


KJ 


KJ 


KJ 




O 
O 


nuuer, \^a\u\ 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 

A 


KJ 


KJ 


O 
O 


nuuer, muiidru 


Y 

A 


Y 

A 


Y 

A 


KJ 


KJ 




1 /~\ IK/ 1 1 n/H d 

JOIiy, LIllLld 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 

A 


Y 

A 


O 


InIK/ Rr\hcir+ \/ Ir 

joiiy, nuueri v jr 


Y 

A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


q 


r\eiiy, uariiei r 




yj 


KJ 




n 


q 


rMruy, vveriuy 


Y 

A 


Y 

A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


KJ 


q 


i\osiopuios, uorotny 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


q 


1 QrirMiK\/ 1 ioo 
LcUUUry, Llod 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


q 
O 


Legere, uonaiu n. jr. 


Y 
A 


KJ 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 




q 


Lincoln, Loring jr 


\J 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


KJ 


Y 
A 


q 
O 


Lincoln, iviaria r 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


KJ 


Y 
A 


q 
o 


1 1 iL-o Path 

LUKe, Dein 




Y 
A 


Y 
A 


KJ 


KJ 


q 


LUKe, oerdiu 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


q 
o 


IVIallldnU, oUSdri L. 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


q 


IVIOIIZ, odliord 


Y 

A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


q 
O 


r^aserbtvy, crioKd 








Y 
A 


Y 
A 


q 


i^dserbKy, noueri 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


q 


rerry, oeraru 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


q 


rerry, joni 


Y 
A 


KJ 


KJ 


Y 
A 


KJ 


q 
O 




Y 

A 


A 


Y 

A 


n 

KJ 


Y 

A 


q 
O 


oneenan, iNeii 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


q 

o 


olloUct?, DidCJlcy 


Y 

A 


Y 
A 


KJ 


r\ 
KJ 


KJ 


q 
O 


opindie, oorrieiid 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


q 


opiriaic, uorncriic 


Y 

A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


q 
O 


oione, James o or 


KJ 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


KJ 


q 
o 


oione, iviarion t. 


Y 

A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


KJ 


Y 
A 


q 
o 


1 enney, iviicnaei 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


Y 
A 


KJ 




q 
o 


V If Idl U , dlt:;! 1 


Y 


Y 

/\ 


Y 


Y 

/\ 


n 


3 


Webster, Mary 











X 


3 


White-DePaolo, Jan 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 



70 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT TOWN MEETING MEMBERSHIP - 2001 



Pre 


Name 


April 30 


May 1 


May 2 


Oct. 15 


Oct. 16 


4 


Baker, Janet N. 


X 





X 


X 


X 


4 


Balliro, Anita 





X 


X 


o 





4 


Balsama, Joseph 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Barden, Marc 


X 


X 


X 








4 


Beatrice, Peter R III 





X 


X 


X 





4 


Bessom, Richard M. 


X 





X 


o 





4 


Boggs, Deborah A 





X 


X 








4 


Cassidy, F.J. Jr 


X 


X 


o 


X 


o 


4 


Cassidy, Marilyn 


X 





X 





o 


4 


Colby, Mary B. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


DeChillo, Mary 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


DIMento, Carol AG 


X 








X 


o 


4 


DiMento, William R. 


X 





o 


X 


X 


4 


Donelan, Robert E 


X 


X 





X 


X 


4 


Donnenfeld, Neil D. 


X 


X 


X 





o 


4 


Drummond, Brian 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Drummond, Ellen M. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Duffy, Pauline M. 


X 


X 


X 








4 


Faico, Michael 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Foley, Phyllis S. 


X 


X 


X 


X 





4 


Fox, Debbie 


X 


X 











4 


Goudreau, Connie 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Hall, David S. 


X 





X 


X 


X 


4 


Heffernan, Philip L 


X 


X 





X 


X 


4 


Hughes, Jack 


X 





X 


X 


X 


4 


Hughes, Nancy T 


X 


X 





X 


X 


4 


Keeter, Theresa 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Kelleher, Martha Gene 


X 





X 


X 


X 


4 


Kinney, Jacqueline 




_ 


_ 


X 


X 


4 


Krippendorf, Edward W Sr 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Leger, Jeanne 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Leilo, Denise 


_ 


X 


X 


_ 




4 


McLeod, Arthur J. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


o 


4 


McNerney, Cynthia F 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Meninno, Christine 


X 


X 


X 





X 


4 


Murphy, Robert W 


X 


X 











4 


O'Brien, Laurie 


X 


X 


X 


X 





4 


Paradise, Joyce 


X 


X 





X 


X 


4 


Phelan, John V III 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Portnoy, Linda 


X 


X 





X 


X 


4 


Powell, Amy Sessler 


X 


X 





X 


X 


4 


Reagan, John 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Santanello, Daniel 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Scolamiero, Dennis 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Shanahan, Patricia 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Shanahan, William 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Somer, Margaret 


X 


X 


X 


X 





4 


Squires, Deborah 


X 





X 


X 


X 


4 


Squires, John Jr 


X 





X 


X 


X 


4 


Vaucher, Catherine 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Wagner, Elizabeth Swift 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Watts, Joanne 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Weaver, Sharon 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Withrow, Mary Susan B 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


4 


Woods. Catherine 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 



71 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT TOWN MEETING MEMBERSHIP - 2001 



Pre 


Name 


Anril 30 


May 1 


Mav P 
iviciy ^ 


Ort 1 


Dot 1 R 


5 


Anderson, Dana 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 

/\ 


5 


Backstrom David R 











o 




5 


Backstrom Nanov Gronipv 








X 


X 


5 


Rplhumpur Ovnthia H 

1 — ' \^ ti it_ji 1 i^ui f V— ^ y 1 III II u 1 i 


X 


X 


o 


X 


X 

/\ 


5 


Rplhiimeur R Thomas 

I— J WlilUIII^UI, 1 1. 1 1 l\J I I I C40 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Bermani Doris P 


X 


X 





o 


o 


5 


Garannpio 1 isa 


X 


X 


X 





o 


5 


Pprra Anthonv .Ir 

\-/ ^ 1 1 u 1 / \i III 1 w 1 1 y w 1 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 

/A 


5 


Gntpllp^*5a Annp 

V.^ 1 1 wOO U , 1 VI 11 Iw 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Daltnn Irpnp 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Dpvlin Mirhapl 

L-/ xZ^VIIII, IViiVri'lldWl 





X 





X 


X 


5 


Fpkman Ma rnarpt 

L_ iiciii, iviaivjui^i 


X 


X 


X 


X 


o 


5 


P a p p 1 1 a N/1 i a 

1 CIO ^1 1 U ) 1 V 1 1 u 


X 


X 


X 


o 


o 


5 


Forman Amv 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Ciil Dpciirpp A 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




f-irppnhprri Har\/P\/ R 

v^i^^iiud^t 1 icii voy 1 1 


X 

/\ 


X 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Hpnnp^^pv Mpr^^inp 

1 ic^iiiic^oo^y, iviC/ioiii^ 


X 


X 


X 






5 


Hpnnp'^'^pv William F 

1 iv7iiiiwooci/yj vviiiiuiii 1 . 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Hnnan Rrian 

1 1 V_/ ^Cll 1 , LJ 1 1 Ul 1 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Irvinp Anna 

M VII 1 v7 , / aI 1 1 1 U 


X 





X 


o 


X 


5 


.laffp .lamp*^ 

CClllW, VJCllli^O 








o 





5 


Karwnw^ki .Inhn R 

iXQIVVVJVVOiNI, OWMII 1 1 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


R 

\J 


i\idy, LCoiic 


X 

/\ 


X 


X 


X 


X 

/\ 


R 


Klim^^ara .liilliptp 


X 


X 


X 


o 


o 




1 phlann Dpahn 1 

L_ U 1 C4 1 1 M t 1— ' ^ CX I III 1 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


5 


1 pwi^ SiJ^an F 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


R 


Mp^winnin Fllpn 1 pvinp 


X 


X 


X 


o 


n 


R 


Mp^winnin *^pntt 1 


X 

/\ 


X 


o 


n 


n 


5 


Moretti Nunzio "Butch" 

IVIWI ^lll, 1 MLJI l^lw 1 / 1 1 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Mplljc Vpeder C 

INC7IIIO, VC^CVJtJI V»/ . 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Paqc Harrv 

1 cioo , 1 1 c( 1 I y 





X 


X 










Patkin Randall 

1 UllNIII, 1 lUllUUll 








X 


X 


X 


R, 


Pvp DarlpHp D 
1 y ^ t 1 / u 1 1 o 1 1 / 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


R, 


RparHnn (~)arl D 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


R 


Riphprt 1 pcilif^ F 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Rnnpr*% Rnhprta O 











X 


X 


R, 


OClllMIJuil, 1 C^ld 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


R. 


*^pihplli Anthnnx/ 

OL/ 1 w 1 1 1 , r\i III lU 1 ly 


X 


o 


X 

/\ 


o 


X 

/\ 


R 


*^hannphan Piax/iH F 

Ol IC4I II Id lul 1, Lyd V 1 . 


X 


X 


X 


o 





R, 


5^hnrp (^pralrlinp 

1 IW 1 w , ^1 CI IV^ 1 1 lO 


X 


X 

/\ 


X 


X 


X 


R, 


5^hnrp Warrpn .1 

v_l livJICIJ, VVUll^il \J 


X 


X 


o 





X 


R 


5^npir^nn (^pralrl 

1 lO II O V/ 1 1 , V^CJI Ct lU 


X 


X 

/\ 


X 


X 


X 


R, 


^nartoQ K/lan/ Anno 

OwCllHJO, Ivluiy r\l 1 1 IC 


X 


o 


Y 

/\ 


n 


o 


R 

\J 


Stpin Harold 

OIC^III, 1 lC(IV^IV-l 





o 


n 






R. 


^tpnhpn*^ Thnma<^ .1 

OlOIJIIdlO, 1 l|l.^lllClO o. 


X 


X 


o 


o 

vy 





R 

\J 


Sullivan Jill G 

\_J LJIIIVUII) Will V— ^ . 


X 


X 

/\ 


X 


X 


X 


R, 


Talknw Rnnpr 

1 curv^v, 1 iwyci 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


R 


Tnnpr Onllppn 

1 U 1 IC> 1 t "w' 1 IC^ CI 1 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


R 


Trinni^ikv Sharnn .1 

1 1 lu w lo r\y , w 1 1 C4I w 1 1 \j . 


X 


X 


X 








R 


Van Dam David S 

V Cl 1 1 1 y dill, L-/ U V lU \J . 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


c; 
\j 


\A/a\/np Kpnnpth P 
vvciyiic?, i\diiit;iii 1 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


c, 
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Wilcinn r^athprinp F 

V V J loLi 1 1 , v_/ ca 1 1 1 1 1 1 ic 1 — . 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




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X 


X 


X 


X 







7^rinQk\/ Irma \A/ 

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X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


5 


7pllpr David 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


5 


Zuchero, William R. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 



72 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT TOWN MEETING MEMBERSHIP - 2001 



Pre 


Name 


April 30 


May 1 


May 2 


Oct. 15 


Oct. 16 


6 


Baker, Robert A. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Bane, Richard 0. 


O 














6 


Bayard, Susan 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Beermann, Jack M. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Block, Ina-Lee 


X 


X 


o 


X 


X 


6 


Block, Lawrence S. 


X 


X 





X 


X 


6 


Burgess, Sue Proctor 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Burke, John F 


X 


X 





X 





6 


Burke, Michael F. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Burke, Scott Douglas 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Cassidy, Reid 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Cleveland, Pamela 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Cohen, Irwin 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Dembowski, Claire C 


X 


X 


X 


X 


o 


6 


DiLisio, Robert E 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Driscoll, Tara Cassidy 


X 


X 


X 


X 


o 


6 


Driscoll, Thomas H. Jr. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Dusseault, Barbara 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 1 


6 


Eriich, Norman A 


X 


X 


X 








6 


Feinberg, Richard R 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Gold, Anne Ward 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Goldberg, Arthur 


X 


X 


X 


X 





6 


Goldman, Jeffrey W. 


X 


X 











6 


Goldman, Martin C. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Gorman, Paul 


X 





X 


X 





6 


Gupta, Mary MK 


X 


X 


X 








6 


Klaman, Barbara 


X 


X 


X 








6 


Klayman, Nancy 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Koidin, Jill 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Kraft, Lori 


X 


X 








o 


6 


Kravetz, Phyllis 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Levenson, Paul E 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Levenson, Sheryl 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Locke, Judith E 


X 


X 








X 


6 


Lunder, Michael 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Markarian, Joseph Jr. 


X 


X 


X 


X 





6 


Merkle, Cynthia 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Nigrelli, Eugene 





X 


X 


X 


o 


6 


O'Hare, Mary 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Paster, Marc. R. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Paster, Ruth G. 


X 


X 


X 


X 





6 


Pelletier, Maria 


X 


X 


X 


X 





6 


Pitman, Martha 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Pohl, Matthew 


X 


X 


X 








6 


Polisson, Sharon 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Rossman, Neil 


X 


X 


X 








6 


Seligman, Edward 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Shulkin, Catherine 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Valle, Michele M. 


X 


X 


X 


X 





6 


Walsh, Kerin 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Watson, Brian T. 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


6 


Weaver, Walter 


X 


X 








X 


6 


Yasi, Barbara 


X 


X 








o 


6 


Yellin, Benjamin 


X 


X 





X 


X 



73 



TOWN WARRANT 



SS. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott 
GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn 
the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in elections and Town affairs to 
vote at: 



Avenue 



Avenue 



Precinct One 



Precinct Two 



Precinct Three 



Precinct Four 



Precinct Five 



Precinct Six 



Clarke School 



Clarke School 



Norfolk Avenue 



Norfolk Avenue 



First Church in Swampscott, Monument 
Congregational 

First Church in Swampscott, Monument 
Congregational 

Swampscott High School Forest Avenue 
Swampscott High School Forest Avenue 



on Tuesday, the thirtieth day of April, 2002, from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the 
following purpose: 



To choose 
To choose 
To choose 
To choose 
To choose 
To choose 
To choose 
To choose 
To choose 
To choose 



a Moderator for one (1 ) year 



two (2 
one (1 
two (2 
one (1 
one (1 
one (1 
one (1 
one (1 
one (1 



members of the Board of Selectmen for three (3) years 
member for the Board of Assessors for three (3) years 
members of the School Committee for three (3) years 
member of the Board of Health for three (3) years 
member of the Board of Health for two (2) years 
member of the Planning Board for five (5) years 
member for the Trustees of the Public Library for three (3) years 
member of the Board of Public Works for three (3) years 
member of the Board of Public Works for one (1) year 



To choose eighteen (18) Town Meeting Members in each of the six (6) Precincts for 
three (3) years 

To choose eighteen (18) Town Meeting Members in each of the six (6) Precincts for 
two (2) years 



74 



To choose eighteen (18) Town Meeting Members in each of the six (6) Precincts for 

one (1 ) year 

At the close of the election, the meeting will adjourn to Monday, the six day of 
May, 2002, at 7:15 p.m. at Swampscott Middle School on Greenwood Avenue, 
Swampscott. 

See the report of the Election Commissioners for the results of the 2002 
Municipal Elections held April 30, 2002. 



75 



I 

I 

2002 ANNUAL AND SPECIAL TOWN MEETINGS ! 

t 

Returns of Service: 

Pursuant to the within warrants to me directed, I have notified the inhabitants of 
the Town of Swampscott, qualified to vote in elections and in town affairs, by posting 
attested copies thereof at the Town Administration Building, at the Post Office and at 
least two public and conspicuous places in each precinct in the town and at or in the 
immediate vicinity of the Swampscott Railroad Station. Said postings were done on 
April 23, 2002 and not less than seven days (14 days for the two Special Town 
Meetings) before the date appointed for said meetings. 

Attest: Paul Minsky 
Constable of Swampscott 



Mailing of Warrants: 

The Warrants for the Annual and Special Town Meetings were mailed to those 
residents who were running for a Town Meeting seat (listed on the ballot) on 
4/16/2002. Warrants were also mailed to the successful write-in Town Meeting 
candidates on 4/26/2002. Copies of the Warrant were available, free of charge, for 
any interested person at the Town Administration Building. 



NOTICE OF ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

The Annual Town Meeting of 2002 will convene on Tuesday, April 30, 2002, 
with Article 1 (the Town Election) at 7:00 a.m. in the Town's regular polling places. At 
8:00 p.m., the Town Meeting will be adjourned until Monday, May 6, 2002, 7:15 p.m., 
in the auditorium of the Swampscott Middle School on Greenwood Avenue. 

NOTICE OF ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MONDAY, MAY 6, 2002, 7:15 P.M. 

To the Town Meeting members: 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article I, Section 2, of the Bylaws of 
the Town of Swampscott that the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting will be held on 
Monday, May 6, 2002, beginning at 7:15 p.m. in the auditorium of the Swampscott 
Middle School on Greenwood Avenue. 

The required identification badge is to be picked up at the auditorium entrance 
when you check in. 



76 



MEETING CERTIFICATIONS 



I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of the Annual Town 
Meeting of April 30, 3003, the Adjourned Town Meeting of May 6, 2002 was held at 
the Swampscott Middle School auditorium on Greenwood Avenue and was called to 
order at 7:21 pm with the necessary quorum being present (265). At 9:58 pm it was 
voted to adjourn to May 7, 2002. 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of May 6, 2002, the 
Adjourned Town Meeting of May 7, 2002 was held at the Swampscott Middle School 
auditorium on Greenwood Avenue and was called to order at 7:23 pm with the 
necessary quorum being present (264). At 7:24 pm it was voted to adjourn the Annual 
Town Meeting to open Special Town Meeting #1 . At 7:27 pm it was voted to dissolve 
Special Town Meeting #1 . At 7:27 pm it was voted to reconvene the Annual Town 
Meeting. At 8:04 pm it was voted to adjourn the Annual Town Meeting to open Special 
Town Meeting #2. At 8:32 pm it was voted to dissolve Special Town Meeting #2. At 
8:32 pm it was voted to reconvene the Annual Town Meeting. At 10:15 pm it was 
voted to dissolve the 2002 Annual Town Meeting. 

ATTENDANCE 

For the 2002 Town Meting attendance, by precinct, see the list at the end of this 
report. 

TOWN MEETING ACTION 

The Return of Service was read by Town Clerk Jack L. Paster who then 
administered the Oath of Office to the Town Meeting members. 

Reverend Dean Pederson, spiritual leader of the First Church in Swampscott, 
Congregational, offered the invocation. 

Moderator Martin C. Goldman presented a Distinguished Citizen Award to 
Hugh "James" Shultz, the town's Veterans Agent. Shultz received a standing ovation 
from the members. 

ACTION UNDER THE ARTICLES 

ARTICLE 2. To hear and act on the reports of Town Officials, Boards and 

Committees. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 2. On motion by Gerard Perry, that the Town Government Study 
Committee be disbanded. 



77 



That the report of the Town Administrator Selection Committee offered by Janet Baker 
be accepted. 

That the report of the town's 150^^ Anniversary Committee offered by Martin Goldman 

be accepted. 



Unanimous Vote. 
5/6/2002 



ARTICLE 3. To see what action the Town will take in relation to the 

salaries of elected Town Officials for the ensuing year. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen ^ 

Voted Article 3. That the Town fix the salary and the compensation of the elected 
officers of the town as provided by Chapter 41 Section 108, General Laws as 
amended, for the twelve month period beginning July 1 , 2002. i 

Constable $100 | 

f 

Unanimous Vote. 

5/6/2002 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer unexpended balances 

as shown on the books of the Town Accountant as of June 30, 2001 , to the Surplus 
Revenue Accounts, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 4: That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 



Unanimous Vote. 

5/6/2002 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money, 

by borrowing or othenwise, to the account of unpaid bills for the purpose of settling all 
bills contracted prior to July 1 , 2001 , and remaining unpaid at the time of the closing of 
the Town's books for the year ending June 30, 2001 , according to the records of the 
Town Accountant, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen j 



78 



Voted Article 5. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 



Unanimous Vote. 
5/6/2002 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Surplus 

Revenue Account of the Town to the account of Current Revenue a sum of money to 
be used and applied by the Board of Assessors in the reduction of the tax levy, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



Voted Article 6. That the sum of $1 ,300,000 be transferred from the Surplus Revenue 
Account to the Current Revenue Account as specified in the Article. 

fVIajority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to transfer funds from various 

Town accounts which have monies remaining therein to such other Town accounts 
which reflect a deficit, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 7. That the sum of $100,000 be transferred from the FY 2002 Maturing 
Debt, Non-Sewer Debt Service account to the Unclassified Section Reserve Fund to 
capture unexpended funds. 



Majority Vote. 
5/6/2002 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, 

by borrowing or otherwise, for the following projects, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Police Department 

03-01 Addition to Police Facility - Sally Port $11 6,000 



79 



Fire Department 

03-02 New Ladder Truck 

Department of Public Works 
03-03 Street Paving 

03-05 Andrews Chapel Repair in Cemetery 

03-06 Ingraham Terrace Retaining Wall 

03-07 Nichols Street Sewer Extension 

03-08 Demolish Buildings at 531 Humphrey Street 

03-09 Fish House Repair 

Scliool Department 

03-11 Windows at Clark & Stanley 1st Phase and Remaining Doors 

03-12 Elec, Plum., and Heating service repairs 

03-13 Install Univents at Machon, Stanley & Hadley 

03-14 Ventilation Upgrade at High School 

03-15 Extraordinary Textbook Replacement Program 

03-16 Instructional Technology 

Board of Selectmen 

03-17 Town Hall Life Safety and Security System Upgrade 
03-18 Town Hall Architectural & Engineering Design Fees 
03-19 Traffic Light at Essex Street 

Recreation Department 

03-20 Replace existing backstops or fencing 

03-21 Renovations to Field House 



$750,000 



9 



$210,000 

$50,000 

$30,000 

$100,000 

$50,000 

$100,000 



$150,000 

$100,000 

$175,000 

$100,000 

$80,000 

$100,000 



$35,000 
$30,000 
$150,000 



$25,000 
$150,000 



Emergency Management Agency 

03-22 Emergency Management Communication and other Misc. Equipment $40,000 



TOTAL 



$2,541,00 



Note: $1,120,266 of total will be supported by other sources. See Table 2 for Detail 
of sources. 



Each numbered item will be considered a separate appropriation. The budgeted 
amount may be spent only for the stated purpose. 

Sponsored by the Capital Improvement Committee 

Voted Article 8. That the Town appropriate the sum of $2,541 ,000 for the purposes 
specified in the Article; further, that the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, be authorized to borrow this amount through the issuance of 
bonds or notes under the appropriate sections of the Massachusetts General Laws, 



80 



and that the Treasurer be authorized to combine this borrowing with any other 
borrowing authorized by this Town Meeting. 

Unanimous Vote. 
5/6/2002 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote appropriate the necessary funds, by 

borrowing or otherwise, for the following projects, or take any action relative thereto. 

No. Purpose Requested 

Recommended 

Police Department 

03- Crisis Intervention and Protection 
22 Equipment 

03- Chemical/Biological Protection 
23 

Fire Department 

03- Chemical/Biological Equipment and $7,000 
24 Supplies 

03- Decontamination Capabilities $18,000 

25 



03- 


Upgrading and Enhancing EMS 


$2,000 





26 


Supplies 






Department of Public Works 






03- 


Sidewalk Plow 


$85,000 





27 








03- 


Water Tower Security - Rebuild Fence $18,000 





28 








School Department 






03- 


Space Adjustments at High School 


$50,000 





29 








03- 


Portable Classrooms at Stanley 


$300,000 





30 








03- 


Furniture 


$100,000 





31 








03- 


New Boilers at Middle School 


$400,000 





32 








03- 


Suspended Ceilings 


$100,000 





33 








03- 


Exterior/Interior Finish Repairs 


$100,000 






$50,000 
$5,000 



81 



34 

03- Waterproof and repoint Brick Phase $175,000 

35 (3) Middle School 

03- Roof & Gutter Replacement or Repair, $250,000 

36 all schools 

03- Science Lab Conversion at High $100,000 

37 School 

03- Bituminous Repairs to School Parking $100,000 

38 Lots (to be done by Public Works) 

Library 

03- Skylight Repair $50,000 

39 

Selectmen 

03- Upgrade of HVAC System AT Town $100,000 
40 Hall 

03- Renovations to Town Hall $850,000 

41 

Council on aging 

03- Renovate Kitchen $30,000 

42 

Public Health Department 

03- Portable/Mobile Refrigeration $5,000 



43 
03 
44 
03 
45 



EMS Triage, Treatment and Staging $1 50,000 
Area 



Chemical/Biological Protection 



$2,000 











Accounting/Finance 

03- Back-Up Unix Server 

46 



$5,000 







Town Hall/Local Government 

03- Scanning Equipment for Engineering, $10,000 

47 Assessors and Building Departments 

03- G IS Software for Town-wide $9,000 

48 departmental Access 











$3,071,000 







82 



Each numbered item will be considered a separate appropriation. The budgeted 
amount may be spent only for the stated purpose. 

Voted Article 9. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Unanimous Vote 
5/6/2002 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of the 

Council on Aging Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of 
the Massachusetts General Laws, said account to be under the direction of the 
Council on Aging and used for the deposit of receipts collected through public 
donations; and further to allow the Council on Aging to expend funds not to exceed 
$5,000 for fiscal year 2003 from said account for ongoing supplies and equipment. 
This would be contingent upon an annual report from the Council on Aging to the 
Town on the total receipts and expenditures of the Account each fiscal year, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 10. That the Town approve this article. 

Majority Vote. 
5/6/2002 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Job Classification 

and Salary Plan of the Personnel Board Bylaws, as it applies to those positions not 
covered by collective bargaining agreements, and appropriate the necessary funds, by 
borrowing or otherwise, as recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Voted Article 1 1 . That the town approve this article and that the sum of $30,848 be 
appropriated therefore. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Board 

Bylaws, other than wage and salary classification, as recommended by the Personnel 
Board, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Personnel Board 



83 



Voted Article 12. That the town approve this article; that new positions created on or 
after this date will not be eligible for a step increase or cost of living increase until July 
2003. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Board 

Bylaws so as to reclassify certain existing positions, as recommended by the 
Personnel Board, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Voted Article 13. That the town approve this article to reclassify three positions 
including the Director of the Council on Aging, the Building Inspector and the Health 
Agent. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the funds 

necessary, by borrowing or otherwise, to implement the collective bargaining 
agreements between the Board of Selectmen and the various unions under the Board 
of Selectmen, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 14. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Unanimous Vote. 

5/6/2002 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the funds 

necessary, by borrowing or otherwise, to implement the collective bargaining 
agreements between the School Department personnel and the Town, which includes, 
but is not limited to, teachers, school administrators, custodians, cafeteria workers, 
clerical and non union employees, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 15. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Unanimous Vote. 



84 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK 
FY2003 OPERATING BUDGET - ARTICLES REPORT 



ine 


Identification 1 


Voted: 


From: 


From: 


Source 


From: 


;em 


1 Appropriation 


tax Rate 


Ava 


il. Funds 


of$ 


Bonding 


1 


Moderator - Expenses 


$ 


50 


$ 50 








' 2 


Finance Comnnittee - Secretary 


$ 


500 


$ 


500 








3 


Expenses 


$ 


150 


$ 


150 








4 


Selectmen - Salaries 


$ 


160,000 


$ 


160,000 








5 


Expenses 


$ 


14,100 


$ 


14,100 








6 


Administration Building - Salaries 


$ 


31,988 


$ 


31,988 








1, 


Expenses 


$ 


13,500 


$ 


13,500 








' 7A 


Cleaning Service - Outside Contract 


$ 


24,000 


$ 


24,000 








11 


Law Department 


$ 


59,000 


$ 


59,000 










1 12 


Parking Ticket Clerk - Salary 


$ 


1 


$ 


1 










I 14 


Workers' Compensation - Expenses, 


$ 


330,500 


$ 


310,500 




20^o_qo 


W/S 






Benefits and Insurance 














' 16 


Accounting Department - Salaries 


$ 


111,518 


$ 


101,518 




lO^OOO 


~w7s' 




1 16A 


Uncompensated Balances 


$ 200,000 


$ 200,000 








17 


Expenses 


$ 42,750 


$ 


32,750 


$ 


10,000 


W/S 




17A 


Technology Department - Salan/ 


$ 


55,660 


$ 


55,660 








17B 


Expenses 


$ 


74,450 


$ 


" >4,450 










18 


Treasurer - Salaries 


$ 


44,352 


$ 


44,352 










19 


Expenses 


$ 


3,300 


$ 3,300 










20 


Town Clerk - Collector - Salaries 


$ 


120,479 


$ 


110,479 




10,000 






21 


Stipend per r\/IGL Ch. 41 , Section 108P 












22 


Town Postage Account (for all depts.) 


$ 


31,500 


$ 


31,500 








23 


Tax Title 


$ 


10,000 


$ 


10,000 








24 


Expenses 


$ 


15,300 


$ 


15,300 








25 


Election Commission - Salaries 


$ 


40,117 


$ 


40,117 








26 


Expenses 


$ 


13,870 


$ 


13,870 








27 


Asessors - Salaries 


$ 


127,956 


$ 


127,956 








28 


Expenses 


$ 


9,900 


$ 


9,900 








29 


Outside Services 


$ 


20,000 


$ 20,000 








30 


Zoning Board of Appeals - Secretary 


$ 


2,898 


$ 


2,898 








31 


Expenses 


$ 


4,100 


$ 


4,100 








32 


Planning Board - Secretary 


$ 


1,000 


$ 


1,000 








33 


Expenses 


$ 


500 


$ 


500 








34 


Contributory Retirement - Pension Cont. 


$ 


1,993,441 


$ 


1,887,033 




106,408 


w/s7/ 




35 


Non-Contributory Retirement - Pen. Contrib. 


$ 


249,000 


$ 


249,000 










36 


Police - Salaries 


$ 


2,204,047 


$ 


2,204,047 










37A 


Animal Control Stipend 


$ 


10,000 


$ 10,000 










38 


Selective Enforcement 


$ 


1,000 


$ 


1,000 










39 


School Traffic Supervisors 


$ 


85,000 


$ 


85,000 










40 


Expenses 


$ 


184,400 


$ 


184,400 










408 


Animal Control Expenses 


$ 


1,550 


$ 


1,550 








40C 


Boarding Animals / Pound Supplies 


$ 


1,500 


$ 


1,500 










42 


Fire - Salaries 


$ 


2,035,406 


$ 


2,035,406 










44 


Expenses 


$ 


78,000 


$ 


78,000 








44A 


Protective Clothing 


$ 


23,000 


$ 


23,000 








45 


Lynn Dispatch / Mutual Aid 


$ 


60,500 


$ 


60,500 








46 


Training 


$ 


30,000 


$ 


30,000 








47 


Harbormaster - Salary 


$ 


6,567 


$ 


6,567 






1 


48 


Expenses 


$ 


4,000 


$ 


4,000 








I 


f~~49 


Emergency Management - Director 


$ 


1,344 


$ 


1,344 










L_ 50 


Expenses 


$ 


3.300 


$ 


3,300 








51 


Sealer of Weights and Measures - Salary 


$ 


5,971 


$ 


5.971 








52 


' Expenses 


$ 535 


$ 535 







85 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK 





FY2003 OPERATING BUDGET 


- ARTICLES REPORT 




Line 1 


ICJCii UN lOallUI 1 ^ 


Voted: ! 


From: 


1 1 1 1 . 


OUUIOt; 




Item 1 




Appropriation 


Tax Rate 


/ \ vail. 1 LJiivjo 


of $ 1 




53[ 


uonsiaDie - oaiary 


$ 100 


$ 100 









54 


DUiiQing/r lurnDing/uas inspector - baiaries 


$ 


^113.186 


$ 


113,186 








55 


1 w ir^ /-\ ir\ r\ /~v 

expenses 


$ 


7,000 


$ 


7,000 









56 


Wire inspecior - cjaianes 


$ 


28,548 


$ 


28,548 








57 1 


expenses 


$ 


10,460 


$ 


10,460 








581 


Consepyation Commission - Expenses 


$ 


800 


$ 


800 








59J 


insurance-oioup neaitn/r roperty/uasuaity 


$ 


2,910,520 


$ 2,740,520 


$ 


170,000 


W/Q 
VV/o 





60' 


Meaitn uepanment - oaiaries 


$ 112,519 


$ 112,519 









62 


Expenses 


$ 


4,275 


$ 


4,275 








63 


Inspections and Tests 


$ 


13,300 


$ 


13,300 






■ — 


63A 


Tests/State Charges 


$ 


13,300 


$ 13,300 






-- 


64 


Rubbish and Recyclables Collections 


"$ 


888,950 


$ 


888,950 








65 


rUDiic vvorKS - oenerai csaianes 




448,636 


$ 


448,636 








66 


General Expenses 


$ 


128,320 


$ 


128,320 








67 


Snow and Ice 


$ 75,000 


$ 75,000 






r- - 


68 


Highway Maintenance (Includes $ for 


$ 


55,000 


$ 


55,000 




1 






Ch. 497 wk and repairs to private roads) \ 










6oA 


L/Uro repair anu graniie repiacemeni 


$ 7,500 


$ 


7,500 









by 


oewer oaidries 


$ 


224,732 




$ 


224,732 


\A//Q 
VV/o 







/U 


oewer tzxpciibub 


$ 63,575 




$ 


63,575 


\A//Q 
VV/O 




/I 


Lynn oewyi 


$ 750,000 




$ 


750,000 


VV/O 





"70 

/ 


oewer oybiciii iviauuciidnofc; 


$ 50,000 




$ 


50,000 


VV/o 




/^3 


vvaier odidrieb 


$ 


229,236 




$ 


229,236 


VV/o 




~7 A 


vvdier tzxpfcjiibfcjb 


$ 


48,845 




$ 


48,845 


\A//C 
W/o 




/ b 


IvIVVnM VVdltJI 


$ 


1,275,000 




$1,275,000 


VV/o 





/O 


vvdier iiTiprovyiiici Kb 




50,000 




$ 


50,000 


\A//Q 
VV/o 




-7-7 
/ / 


1 oeriieiery - odidritjb 


$ 


192,709 


$ 192,709 








10 
10 


UGmeiery expenses 


$ 


14,238 


$ 


14,238 








~7C\ 

/y 


Ur vV opeClal MCCOUntS 


$ 


162,000 


$ 


162,000 









oU 


nGCrGaiion ooiTirnission - oaiaries 


$ 


66,500 


$ 


66,500 








Q 1 

01 




$ 


11,620 


$ 


11,620 








_ 


Q 


Council on Aging - Salaries 


$ 


60,995 


$ 


60,995 









QO A 


Part-time positions with no benefits 


$ 


9,000 


$ 


9,000 






il 


Q 
00 


Expenses 


$ 


28,000 


$ 


28,000 








Q /I 


Veterans' Services - Director's Salary 


$ 


8,947 


$ 8,947 








■ — 


OD 


Expenses 


$ 


2,300 


$ 


2,300 






— 


cSb 


Assistance 


$ 


10,000 


$ 10,000 








/ 


.Debt - fvlunicipal 


$ 


1,635,580 


$ 


1,328,738 


$ 306,842 


VV/o 




cSc) 


1 Debt - Water/Sewer 


$ 


1,236,826 


$. 


1 ,074,405 


$ 162,421 


\A//C 
VV/o 






$1 ,074,405 funded-Sewer Debt Override 














RQ 


Library - Salaries 


$ 


346,607" 


$ 


346,607 








yu 


' Expenses 


$ 


36,900 


$ 


36,900 






1 


Q 1 
y 1 


' Materials 


$ 106,922 


$ 


106,922 








QO 

y<i 


'Town Reports 


$ 3,244 


$ 


3,244 






t 


yo 


'Telephone Expense - most departments 


$ 35,000 


$ 35,000 








Q/1 

y4 


Street Lighting 


$ 165,000 


$ 


165,000 






- - 


yo 


^Reserve Fund 


'175,000 


$ 175,000 








yb 


! Settlements 


$ 1 ,000 


$ 1,000' 






. 1 


Q7 

y / 


i Audit 


$ 


27,000 


$ 


27,000 








QP 

yo 


Historical Commission 


$ 1 ,000 


$ 1 ,000 






- 1 




iMedicare Tax 


$ 


206,000 


$ 206,000" 








100 


IHAWC 


$ 


2,500 


$ 


2,500 






i 


101 


Stabilization Fund 


^ $ 


388,078 


$ 


388,078 









h 

I 



86 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK 
FY2003 OPERATING BUDGET - ARTICLES REPORT 



102 


Clerical Pool 


$ 32,733 


$ 32,733 








"'103 
104 


Ambulance Service 


$ 138.000 


$ 138.000 








Regional Vocational School 


$ 97,032 


$ 97.032 








105 


School Budget 


$ 17,348,230 


$ 17,348.230 








TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 


$38,599,763 


$35,112,704 


$3,487,059 
































Budget Notes: Available Funding Sources: 














W/S=Water and Sewer Fees 


























Jne 
























Identification 


Voted: | From: 


From: 


Source 


From: 


tem 


Appropriation | Tax Rate 


Avail. Funds 


'of^$ 


Bonding 


*\-6 Transfer to Current Revenue 


$ 1,300,000 1 


$ 1,300,000 


* 




^-7 
^-8 


Transfer to Reserve Fund 


$ 100,000 




$ 100,000 


* * 




Capital Improvement Projects - 20 projects 


$ 2,541,000 




i 


$2,541,000 


VII j Personnel Board Wage Increases 


$ 30,848 


$ 30,848 








^-16 i Departmental Operating Budgets 


$38,599,763 


$35,112,704 


$3,487,059 


See Above 


VI 7 IdpW - Highway Projects 


$ 78,359 




$ 78,359 


* * * 




A-18 


DPW - Storm Water Management 


$ 275,000 




$ 275,000 






VI 9 DPW - Water System Work 


$ 560,266 








$ 560,266 


STM-I .Collective Bargaining Agreements 


$ 176,189 


$ 176,189 








t 


TOTAL BUDGET AND ARTICLES 


$43,661,425 


$35,319,741 


$5,240,418 




$3,101,266 






























Notes: Available Funding Sources: 












* From Surplus Revenue 














** From FY02 Non-Sewer Debt Service 














*** From f^A Highway Funds 














**** From Waste Water Enterprise Fund 













87 



5/6/2002 



ARTICLE 16. To act on the report of the Finance Committee on the Fiscal 

Year 2003 budget and to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds money 
for the operation of the Town's Departments and the payment of debt service and all 
other necessary and proper expenses for the year, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted Article 16. That the town approve this article and that the following amounts of 
money be appropriated for the several purposes hereinafter itemized. Each numbered 
line item may be spent only for the stated purpose. 



88 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK 
FY2003 OPERATING BUDGET - ARTICLES REPORT 



I e 



Identification 



Voted: From: From: Source From: 

Appropriation Tax Rate Avail. Funds of $ Bonding 



1 Moderator - Expenses 


$ 


50 


$ 


50 








2 Finance Committee - Secretary 


$ 


500 


$ 


500 








3 Expenses 


$ 


150 


$ 


150 








4 Selectmen - Salaries 


$ 


160,000 


$ 


160,000 








5 Expenses 


$ 


14,100 


$ 


14,100 








1 6 Administration Building - Salaries 


' $ 


31,988 


$ 


31,988 








7 Expenses 


$ 


13,500 


$ 


13,500 








7A Cleaning Service - Outside Contract 


$ 


24,000 


$ 


24,000 








11 Law Department 


$ 


59,000 


$ 


59,000 








12 Parking Ticket Clerk - Salary 


$ 


1 


$ 


1 








14 Workers' Compensation - Expenses, 


$ 


330,500 


$ 


310,500 


$ 


20,000 


W/S 


Benefits and Insurance 
















16 Accounting Department - Salaries 


$ 


111,518 


$ 


101,518 


$ 


10,000 


w/s 


16A Uncompensated Balances 


$ 


200,000 


$ 


200,000 








17 Expenses 


' $ 


42,750 


$ 


32,750 


$ 


10,000 


W/S 


17A Technology Department - Salary 


$ 


55,660 


$ 


55,660 








178 Expenses 


$ 


74,450 


$ 


74,450 








18 Treasurer - Salaries 


$ 


44,352 


$ 


44,352 








19 Expenses 


$ 


3,300 


$ 


3,300 








20 Town Clerk - Collector - Salaries 


$ 


120,479 


$ 


110,479 


$ 


10,000 


w/s 



CL. 

o 

2 



V3 



21 Stipend per MGL Ch. 41 , Section 108P 


22 Town Postage Account (for all depts.) 


$ 


31,500 


$ 


31,500 


23 Tax Title 


$ 


10,000 


$ 


10,000 


1 24 Expenses 


$ 


15,300 


$ 


15,300 


25 Election Commission - Salaries 


$ 


40,117 


$ 


40,117 


26 Expenses 


$ 


13,870 


$ 


13,870 


1 27 Asessors - Salaries 


$ 


127,956 


$ 


127,956 


28 Expenses 


$ 


9,900 


$ 


9,900 


29 Outside Services 


$ 


20,000 


$ 


20,000 


30 Zoning Board of Appeals - Secretary 


$ 


2,898 


$ 


2,898 


31 Expenses 


$ 


4,100 


$ 


4,100 


32 Planning Board - Secretary 


$ 


1,000 


$ 


1,000 


33 Expenses 


$ 


500 


$ 


500 


34 Contributory Retirement - Pension Cont. 


$ 


1,993,441 


$ 


1,887,033 $ 106,408 W/S 


35 Non-Contributory Retirement - Pen. Contrib. 


$ 


249,000 


$ 


249,000 


36 Police - Salaries 


$ 


2,204,047 


$ 


2,204,047 


37A Animal Control Stipend 


$ 


10,000 


$ 


10,000 


38 Selective Enforcement 


$ 


1,000 


$ 


1,000 


39 School Traffic Supervisors 


$ 


85,000 


$ 


85,000 


40 Expenses 


' $ 


184,400 


$ 


184,400 


408 Animal Control Expenses 


■ $ 


1,550 


$ 


1,550 


40C Boarding Animals / Pound Supplies 


$ 


1,500 


$ 


1,500 


42 Fire - Salaries 


$ 


2,035,406 


$ 


2,035,406 


44 Expenses 


$ 


78,000 


$ 


78,000 


44A Protective Clothing 


$ 


23,000 


$ 


23,000 


45 Lynn Dispatch / Mutual Aid 


$ 


60,500 


$ 


60,500 


46 Training 


$ 


30,000 


$ 


30,000 


47 Harbormaster - Salary 


$ 


6,567 


$ 


6,567 


48 Expenses 


$ 


4,000 


$ 


4,000 


49 Emergency Management - Director 


$ 


1,344 


$ 


1,344 



89 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK 
FY2003 OPERATING BUDGET - ARTICLES REPORT 



50 Expenses 


$ 


3,300 


$ 


3,300 








51 Sealer of Weights and Measures - Salary 


$ 


5,971 


$ 


5,971 








52 Expenses 


$ 


535 


$ 


535 " 








Line Identification 


Voted: 


From: 


From: 


Source From: 


Item 


Appropriation 


fax Rate 


Avail. Funds 


of $ Bonding 


53 Constable - Salary 


$ 


100 


$ 


100 








54 Building/Plumbing/Gas Inspector - Salaries 


$ 


113,186 


$ 


113,186 








55 Expenses 


$ 


7,000 


$ 


7,000 








56 Wire Inspector - Salaries 


$ 


28,548 


$ 


28,548^ 








57 Expenses 


$ 


10,460 


$ 


10,460 








58 Conservation Commission - Expenses 


$ 


800 


$ 


800 








59 Insurance-Group Health/Property/Casualty 


$ 


2,910,520 


$ 


2,740,520 




170,000 


W/S 


60 Health Department - Salaries 


$ 


112,519 


$ 


112,519 








62 Expenses 


$ 


4,275 


$ 


4,275 








63 Inspections and Tests 


$ 


13,300 


$ 


13,300 








63A Tests/State Charges 


$ 


13,300 ' 


$ 


13,300 








64 Rubbish and Recyclables Collections 


$ 


888,950 


$ 


888,950 








65 Public Works - General Salaries 


$ 


448,636 


$ 


448,636 








66 General Expenses 


$ 


128,320 


$ 


128,320 








67 Snow and Ice 


$ 


75,000 


$ 


75,000 








68 Highway Maintenance (Includes $ for 


$ 


55,000 


$ 


55,000 








Oh. 497 wk and repairs to private roads) 


68A Curb repair and granite replacement 


$ 


7,500 


$_ 


7,500 








69 Sewer Salaries 


$ 


224,732 






$ 


224,732 ' 


W/ S ' 


70 Sewer Expenses 




63,575 






$ 


63,575 


W/S 


71 Lynn Sewer 


$ 


750,000 






$ 


750,000 


W/S 


72 Sewer System Maintenance 


$ 


50,000 






$ 


50,000 


W/S 


73 Water Salaries 


$ 


229,236 






$ 


229,236 


W/S 


74 Water Expenses 


$ 


48,845 






$ 


48,845 


W/S 


75 MWRA Water 


$ 


1,275,000 






$1,275,000 


W/S 


76 Water Improvements 


$ 


50,000 






$ 


50,000 


W/S 


77 Cemetery - Salaries 


$ 


192,709 


$ 


192,709 








78 Cemetery Expenses 


$ 


14,238 


$ 


14,238 








79 DPW Special Accounts 


' $ 


" 162,000 


$ 


162,000 








80 Recreation Commission - Salaries 


$ 


66,500 


$ 


66,500 








81 Expenses 


$ 


11,620 


$ 


11,620 






- 


82 Council on Aging - Salaries 


$ 


60,995 


$ 


60,995 








82A Part-time positions with no benefits 


$ 


9,000 


$ 


9,000 








83 Expenses 


$ 


28,000 


$ 


28,000 








84 Veterans' Services - Director's Salary 


$ 


8,947 


$ 


8,947 








85 Expenses 


$ 


2,300 


$ 


2,300 








86 Assistance 


$ 


10,000 


$ 


10,000 








87 Debt - Municipal 


$ 


1,635,580 


$ 


1,328,738 


$ 


306,842 


W/S 


88 Debt - Water/Sewer 


$ 


1,236,826 


$ 


1,074,405 


$ 


162,'42r 


W/S ' 1 


$1,074,405 funded-Sewer Debt Override 
















89 Library - Salaries 


$ 


346,607 


$ 


346,607 








90 Expenses 


$ 


36,900 


$ 


36,900 








91 Materials 


$ 


106,922 


$ 


106,922 








92 Town Reports 


$ 


3,244 


$ 


3,244 ^ 








93 Telephone Expense - most departments 


$ 


35,000 


$ 


35,000 








94 Street Lighting 


$ 


165,000 


$ 


165,000 








95 Reserve Fund 


$ 


175,000 


$ 


175,000 









90 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK 
FY2003 OPERATING BUDGET - ARTICLES REPORT 



yo ocuici 1 ici lib 


^J> 1 ,UUU 


3) 1 ,UUU 






Q7 AiiHit 

y( MUvjii 


ii 97 nnn 


<i; 97 nnn 






yo nioiuiiucii oui 1 11 1 iiooiui 1 


•J) 1 ,uuu 


<?; 1 nnn 
4> 1 ,uuu 







yy ivicun^dic 1 dA 


<R OOP, nnn 


onp. nnn 







inn MA\A/P 


9 ^nn 


<t 9 t^nn 






ini QfoKiliTQtion F-i inH 


>J) ooo,u / o 


<t QQQ n7R 

















103 Ambulance Service 


<s 1 "^ft nnn 


<t i -30 nnn 







104 Regional Vocational School 




<t Q7 n'^9 




. 


105 School Budget 




<C 1 7 l/lft 9'5n 

%I> 1 / ,omi,^o\j 








TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 


$38,599,763 


$35,112,704 


$ 3,487,059 






























Budget Notes: Available Funding Sources: 






W/S=Water and Sewer Fees 










ne 


Identification 


Voted: 


From: 


From: 


Source From: 


jm 




Appropriation 


Tax Rate 


Avail. Funds 


of$ Bonding 


■6 


Transfer to Current Revenue 


$ 1,300,000 




$ 1,300,000 


* 


-7 


Transfer to Reserve Fund 


$ 100,000 




$ 100,000 


** 


-8' 


Capital Innprovement Projects - 20 projects 


$ 2,541,000 






$2,541,000 


-11 


Personnel Board Wage Increases 


$ 30,848 


$ 30,848 






-16 


Departmental Operating Budgets 


$38,599,763 


$35,112,704 


$3,487,059 


See Above 


-17 


DPW- Highway Projects 


$ 78,359 




$ 78,359 


*** 


-18 


DPW - Storm Water Management 


$ 275,000 




$ 275,000 


**** 


-19 


DPW - Water System Work 


^$ 560,266 






$ 560,266 


TM-1 


Collective Bargaining Agreements 


$ 176,189 


$ 176,189 








TOTAL BUDGET AND ARTICLES 


$43,661,425 


$35,319,741 


$5,240,418 


$3,101,266 


















Notes: Available Funding Sources: 






* From Surplus Revenue 






** From FY02 Non-Sewer Debt Service 






*** From MA Highway Funds 












**** From Waste Water Enterprise Fund 











91 



Majority Vote. 
5/6/2002 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the amount of 

$78,359.19 from available funds from the Massachusetts Highway Department under 
the provisions of Chapter 53(B) of the Acts of 1 999 and Chapter 1 50 of the Acts of 
2000 of the Massachusetts General Laws. Said funds to be used by the Department 
of Public Works for highway projects approved by the Massachusetts Highway 
Department pursuant to this section, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 17. That the town approve this article. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of $275,000 

for the purpose of financing the planning of water pollution abatement facilities with a 
comprehensive storm water management plan, including without limitation all costs 
thereof as defined in Section 1 of Chapter 29C of the Massachusetts General Laws; 
that to meet this appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen is authorized to transfer $275,000 from available funds, transfer $275,000 
from the Wastewater Enterprise Fund, or borrow $275,000 and issue bonds or notes 
therefore under Chapter 44 of the General Laws and /or Chapter 29C of the General 
Laws; that such bonds or notes shall be general obligations of the Town of 
Swampscott unless the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen 
determines that they should be issued as limited obligations and may be secured by 
local system revenues as defined in Section 1 of Chapter 29C; that the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow all or a portion of such 
amount from the Water Pollution Abatement Trust established pursuant to Chapter 
29C and in connection therewith to enter into a loan agreement and/ or security 
agreement with the Trust and othenwise contract with the Trust and the Department of 
Environmental Protection with respect to such loan and for any federal or state aid 
available for the planning and financing thereof; that the Board of Selectmen is 
authorized to enter into a project regulatory agreement with the Department of 
Environmental Protection to expend all funds available for the project; or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Public Works 

Voted Article 18. That the Town approve this article. 



92 



Unanimous Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 1 9. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $560,266 to 

improve the Town's water system and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow $560,266 under 
MGL c. 44; and the Board of Selectmen and/or the Board of Public Works be 
authorized to contract for and expend any federal, state or MWRA aid available for the 
project, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Board of Public Works to 
submit, on behalf of the Town, any and all applications deemed necessary for grants 
and/or reimbursements from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the United 
States under any state and/or federal programs to receive and accept such grants or 
reimbursement for this purpose, and/or any others in any wan connected with the 
scope of this Article, provided that the amount of the authorized borrowing shall be 
reduced by the amount of such aid received prior to the issuance of bonds or notes 
under this vote and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the Board of Public Works be 
authorized to take any other action necessary to carry out this project., or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Public Works 

Voted Article 19. That the Town approve this Article. 

Unanimous Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 

Selectmen and the Board of Public Works to enter into a contract not to exceed ten 
years with wireless telecommunication tower companies to lease antenna space on 
the Water Tank and Humphrey Street Pumping Station, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Public Works 

Voted Article 20. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Unanimous Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 

Selectmen and Board of Public Works to enter into a lease not to exceed ten-years 



93 



with a tenant for the land and building owned by the Town at 26 New Ocean Street, or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Public Works 

Voted Article 21. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 

Selectmen to enter into a contract not to exceed four years with an electric supply 
company for the purpose of procuring an electric supply to service certain municipal 
accounts, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 22. That the Town approve this article. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the establishment of a 

Highway Safety Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, §53E/4 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, said account to be under the direction of the Chief of 
Police and used for the deposit of receipts collected through fines assessed against 
personal motor vehicles as well as commercial motor vehicles by the Traffic Safety 
Enforcement Unit; and further allow the Chief of Police to expend fees not to exceed 
$20,000 for each fiscal year from said account for the purpose of maintenance of 
equipment related to highway safety, contingent upon an annual report from the Chief 
of Police to the town on the total receipts and expenditures of the account each fiscal 
year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Chief of Police 

Voted Article 23. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Unanimous Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer 

from available funds or borrow the amount of $20,000 for the purpose of complying 
with GASB 34 requirements for fixed assets, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Accountant 



94 



Voted Article 24. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 



Majority Vote. £ 
5/7/2002 I 

~j 
so 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provision of Chapter }^ 

44, §53Fy2 of the Massachusetts General Laws, for the purpose of establishing a § 
Sewer Enterprise Fund effective July 1 , 2002, or take any action relative thereto. S 
Sponsored by the Town Accountant 3 

Voted Article 25. That the Town approve this Article. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the ensuing year's expenses of the Sewer Department, said sum to be 
offset by revenues of the Sewer Department during fiscal year 2003, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Accountant 

Voted Article 26. That the Town to approve this Article. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 

44, §53FV2 of the Massachusetts General Laws, for the purpose of establishing a 
Water Enterprise Fund effective July 1 , 2002, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Accountant 

Voted Article 27. That the Town vote to approve this Article. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



95 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the ensuing year's expenses of the Water Department, said sum to be 
offset by revenues of the Water Department during fiscal year 2003, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Accountant 

Voted Article 28. That the Town approve this Article. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 1 of Article II 

(pertaining to Town Meeting) of the Bylaws of the Town of Swampscott by deleting the 
third sentence which provided that the deliberative portion of the Annual Town 
Meeting be held the first Monday next after the election of officers and substituting the 
following: 

"After the counting and declaration of votes for officers at an Annual Town Meeting, 
said meeting shall be adjourned to the third Monday of May at 7:15 p.m. at such place 
as may be designated by the Selectmen, and at which time and at any adjournment 
thereof, the remaining articles of the warrant shall be taken up." 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 29. That the Town amend the General By-Laws of the Town of 
Swampscott as specified in the Article. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to accept, upon its passage into law 
by the Legislature and having been signed by the Governor, the Early Retirement 
Incentive Program as provided for under Chapter 32 of the Massachusetts General 
Laws, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 30. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



96 



ARTICLE 31 . To amend the Bylaws of the Town of Swampscott by adding 
Section 8 to Article III (Town Finances) as follows: 

Section 8. The Board of selectmen and the School Committee shall promptly notify 
the Finance Committee of negotiations that may take place during the Collective 
Bargaining process that could have future financial implications to the Town. Any 
communications from the Selectmen or the School Committee to the Finance 
Committees shall solely be by way of advice and shall not derogate from their 
statutory obligations to negotiate in good faith with the Town employees. 

The Personnel Board shall promptly notify the Finance Committee of any proposed 
changes that it is entertaining that could have future financial implications to the Town, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 31. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 
40, Section 8G of the Massachusetts General Laws, authorizing agreements with 
other cities and towns to provide mutual aid programs for police departments, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Chief of Police 

Voted Article 32. That the Town accept the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 40 Section 8G. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 

3Y of MGL Chapter 143 of the Acts added by the State in 1980 which provides: 

"Inspector of Buildings, Building Commissioner or Local Inspector 

Appointment 

In any city or town which accepts the provisions of this section, inspector of buildings, 
building commissioner, or local inspector so employed and designated under this 
section shall be appointed for a minimum term of three years and such three year 
term or more shall not be diminished by an unexpired term of a predecessor, and he 
shall not be removed from office during his term except for just cause and after a 
hearing has been held on charges by and before the appointing authority." 



97 



or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Inspector of Buildings 

Voted Article 33. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws as 
follows: 

DEFINITIONS: GROSS FLOOR AREA: 

For clarification in calculations add: "excluding basement and 

cellars" 

LOT, FRONTAGE OF: 
To simplify and correct a drafting and editing error replace the existing definition with 
the following: 

A lot line coinciding with the sideline of a street which provides both legal rights of 
vehicular access and physical vehicular access to the lot, said line to be measured 
continuously along a single street or along two (2) intersecting streets. 
See Figure 2 in Appendix B. 

SECTION 2.3.3.0. 

Add a new Section, 2.3.3.4 to add clarity to Town policies regarding fences as follows 
2.3.3.4 Fences not more than six feet in height are permitted accessory structures in 
all districts. Fences greater in height than six fee may be erected on a lot in any 
district pursuant to a special permit issued by the Zoning Board of Appeals in 
accordance with Section 5.3.0.0. 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Zoning Bylaw Review Committee 

Voted Article 34. That the subject matter of this Article be referred to the Planning 
Board for further study. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to eliminate the School 

Department's funding for cat dissections, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by Alice Jane Winston, et al. 



98 



Voted Article 35. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 



Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to 

establish a committee to plan for the creation of a Recreational Trail along the 
abandoned railroad track, now owned and used by National Grid as a power 
transmission corridor, between Paradise Road and the Marblehead border where it 
will connect with the Recreational Trail in Marblehead. It is further the intent of this 
Article to indicate the sense of the Town that such a trail be built, and that the costs of 
building the trail should be absorbed privately, or at no net cost to the town over a 
suitable period, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by Richard Frenkel, et al 

Voted Article 36. That the Town authorize the Selectmen to establish a committee to 
study the proposal to create a recreational trail along the abandoned railroad corridor 
now owned by National Grid. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to permit dogs on public beaches 

for the purposes of exercise and play before 9:00 a.m. and after 6:00 p.m. from May 
21 to September 30. In accordance with town ordinances, dogs are to be under direct 
control and supervision of owners/ keepers at all times and the pooper-scooper bylaw 
will apply, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by Scott E. Coughlin, et al 

Voted Article 37. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise, by 

borrowing or otherwise, under any general or special law which authorizes the Town 
to raise money, by borrowing or othen/vise, such sums of money as may be necessary 
for any and all of the purposes mentioned in the foregoing articles. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 38. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 



99 



Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 

ACTION UNDER SPECIAL TOWN MEETING #1 

Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the funds necessary, by borrowing 
or othenA/ise, to implement the collective bargaining agreements between the Board of 
Selectmen and the various unions under the Board of Selectmen, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 1 . That the Town approve this Article and that the sum of $1 76, 1 89 
be appropriated therefore. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 

ACTION UNDER SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 32 

ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 

to acquire by gift, purchase, or otherwise and to accept the grant to the Inhabitants of 
the Town of a permanent park and recreation easement in, under, through, across, 
upon, and along a portion of the property located at 207 Forest Ave, now or formerly 
owned by Tedesco Country Club, (the Tedesco easement) being a portion of the 
property shown as Lots 35, 31, and 25, and as set forth in the easement plan, on 
Plate 17 of the Swampscott Assessor's Map, upon such terms and conditions as the 
board shall determine appropriate, for the purposes of a park and for recreation, and 
to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or borrow a sum of money for 
such purposes, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 1 . That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 

to acquire by gift, purchase, or otherwise and to accept the grant to the Inhabitants of 
the Town of a permanent park and recreation easement in, under, through, across, 
upon, and along a portion of the property located along the Carson Ter. right of way, 
now or formerly owned by Bardon Trimount, Inc., Aggregate Industries, Inc. (the 
Aggregate easement) being a portion of the property shown as Lot 99, and as set 
forth in the easement plan, on Plate 12 on the Swampscott Assessor's Map upon such 
terms and conditions as the board shall determine appropriate, for the purposes of a 



100 



park and recreation and to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow a sum of money for such purposes, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 2. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of $5,000,000 by 

borrowing or otherwise, to be expended by the Swampscott School Committee, for the 
purpose of design of a new Swampscott High School as set forth in the Master Plan 
developed by Symmes Mani & Mckee Associates, and the design and development of 
parks and recreation facilities on and adjacent to the park and recreation easements 
known as the Tedesco easement and the Aggregate Easement, provided however, 
that no amounts shall be borrowed or expended hereunder unless and until the Town 
votes at an election to exempt from the provisions of Proposition 2 1/2, so-called, the 
amounts required to pay for the bonds or notes issued therefore, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 3. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Majority Vote. 
5/7/2002 



101 



2002 Swampscott Town Meeting Attendance 



Pre 


Nanne 


5/6/02 


5/7/02 


1 


Adams, Deborah 


X 


X 


1 


Adams, Ryan 


X 


X 


1 


Alpert, Julius H. 


o 


X 


1 


Baldacci, Richard R. 


X 


X 


1 


Bartram - DePaolo, Amanda S. 


X 


X 


1 


Bartram, Glenn D. 


X 


X 


1 


Batchelder, Kathleen 


X 


X 


1 


Bates, Wallace T. 


X 


X 


1 


Bickford, Barbara 


X 


X 


1 


Birchmore, Sally 


X 


X 


1 


Bitman, Bernard 


o 





1 


Blonder, Cindy M, 


X 


X 


1 


Blonder, Jeffrey S. 


X 


X 


1 


Brenner, Lawrence 


X 


X 


1 


Buchanan, Susan 


X 


X 


1 


Chouinard, Conrad L. 


X 


X 


1 


Chouinard, Madeline 


X 


X 


1 


Cresta, Gino A. Jr. 


X 


X 


1 


Cropley, John H. Jr. 


X 


X 


1 


Dandreo, Robert 


X 


X 


1 


Doherty-Healey, Mary 


X 


X 


1 


Feinberg, Helen 1. 





X 


1 


Finlay, Patricia 


X 


X 


1 


Gallant, Cheryl 





o 


1 


Genest, Lee Bartlett 


X 


X 


1 


Harrington, Vera C. 





X 


1 


Healey, Thomas J. 


X 





1 


Hyde, Sally A. 


X 


X 


1 


Hyde, William R. 


X 


X 


1 


Jaeger, Robert C. 


X 


X 


1 


Johnson, Maryalice 


X 


X 


1 


Kaloust, Gerald J. 


X 


X 


1 


Kaloust, Roberta A. 


X 


X 


1 


Kearney, Sheila 


X 


X 


1 


Kessler, Nelson 


X 


X 


1 


Legere, Arthur J. 


X 


X 


1 


Lombard, James 


X 


X 


1 


Maher, William M. 


X 


X 


1 


Maitland, J Richard 


o 





1 


Maitland, Susan 


X 


X 


1 


Marrs, Mary Regan 


X 


X 


1 


Montague, Neil 


X 


X 


1 


Patrikis, Theodore A. 


X 


X 


1 


Perry, Robert E 








1 


Perry, Stefanie 


X 


X 


1 


Picariello, John A. 


X 


X 


1 


Picariello, Lawrence 


X 


X 


1 


Rizzo, John F. 


X 


X 


1 


Shannon, Cynthia 


X 


X 


1 


Shapiro, Barbara R. 





X 


1 


Shiloh, Naomi R 


X 


X 


1 


Speranza, Frances M. 


o 


X 




Speranza-Hartmann, Marianne 





X 




Whittier, Douglas 


X 


X 



102 



2002 Swampscott Town Meeting Attendance 



Pre 


Name 


5/6/02 


5/7/02 


2 


Barden, Eugene 


X 


X 


2 


Best, Mary A. 


X 


X 


2 


Booras, Peter 


X 


X 


2 


Bowen, David 


X 


X 


2 


Brown, Mary Lisa 


X 


X 


2 


Cameron, Janell A. 


X 


X 


2 


Carrigan, Lisa 


X 





2 


Cassidy, Timothy P. 


X 


X 


2 


Curry, Martha 


X 


X 


2 


Doherty, Daniel E. 


X 


X 


2 


Doherty, John J, 


X 


X 


2 


Dunn, Judith F. 


X 


X 


2 


Dunn, Larry 


- 


X 


2 


Giosa, Kellie 


o 


X 


2 


Hebert, Donald 


X 


X 


2 


Hebert, Janet 


X 


X 


2 


Higgins, Wilbur III 


o 


o 


2 


Hitchcock, Sarah P. 


X 


o 


2 


Hoey, Robin 


X 


X 


2 


Huber, Carol 


X 


X 


2 


Huber, Richard 


X 


X 


2 


Hunt, Kim 


X 


o 


2 


Hunt, Stephen 


X 


X 


2 


Jackson, Lorene 


X 


X 


2 


Laband, Andrew 


o 


o 


2 


LaConte, Louise M. 


X 


X 


2 


LaConte, Vincent A. 


o 





2 


Lyons, Sean 


X 


X 


2 


Lyons, Wendy A. 


X 


X 


2 


Marcou, Martha L. 


X 


X 


2 


McHugh, Terri 


o 





2 


Murphy, Brian C. 


o 





2 


Myette, Robert 


X 


X 


2 


Newhall, Linda A. 


X 


X 


2 


Newhall, Walter 


X 


o 


2 


Owens, Charles 


X 


X 


2 


Palleschi, Edward A. 


o 





2 


Pitman, Michael 


X 


X 


2 


Ramstine, Patricia Karamas 


X 


X 


2 


Reardon, Ellen M. 


X 


X 


2 


Richmond, David E. 


X 


X 


2 


Romano, John L. 


X 


X 


2 


Rubin, Debra 


X 


X 


2 


Ruggiero, John 


X 


X 


2 


Ryan, Leah 


X 


X 


2 


Schultz, Jackson 


o 


X 


2 


Shanahan, Joseph E. Jr. 


X 


X 


2 


Sinrich, Michael 


o 


o 


2 


Strauss, Danielle 


X 


X 


2 


Strauss, Mathew 


X 


X 


2 


Sullivan, Brian 


o 


o 


2 


Whean, Jean 


o 


o 


2 


Whelan, David 


o 


o 


2 









c 

i 



r3 



=3 

i 

t/5 



103 



2002 Swampscott Town Meeting Attendance 



Pre 


Name 


5/6/02 


5/7/02 


3 


Barden, Michele Cobban 





o 


3 


Bennett, Ralph E. II 


X 


X 


3 


Boggs, Deborah 


X 


X 


3 


Breen, Kevin 


X 


X 


3 


Breen, Leslie A. 


X 


X 


3 


Campbell, Michael S. 





X 


3 


Cardenas, Patricia 


X 


X 


3 


Cassidy, John R. 


X 


X 


3 


Coletti, John M. 


X 


X 


3 


Cormier, Kathleen 


X 


X 


3 


Dandreo, Daniel J. Ill 


o 


o 


3 


Donahue, Linda Bray 








3 


Donnelly, Robert 


o 


o 


3 


Doolan, James E. 


X 


o 


3 


Driscoll-Fields, Anne 





X 


3 


Eldridge, Barbara F. 


X 


X 


3 


Frenkel, Lenora T. 


X 


X 


3 


Frenkel, Richard 


X 


X 


3 


Gay, Donna 


X 


X 


3 


Gilberg, Richard 








3 


Golden, Edward 





X 


3 


Goodwin, Jeremy 


X 


X 


3 


Hayes, Paul E. 


X 


X 


3 


Holmes, Betty Dean 


X 


X 


3 


ludice, Michael A. 


o 





3 


Jolly, Linda J. 


X 


X 


3 


Jolly, Robert V. Jr. 


X 


o 


3 


Kelleher, Martha G. 








3 


Lawlor, James C. 


X 


X 


3 


Ledbury, Lisa J. 


o 





3 


Legere, Donald R. Jr. 


X 


X 


3 


Lincoln, Loring B. Jr. 


X 


X 


3 


Lincoln, Maria F. 


X 


X 


3 


Luke, Gerald 


X 


X 


3 


Magee, Kathleen 


X 


X 


3 


Man/osh, Smilia 


X 


X 


3 


Mcintosh, Richard T. 


X 


X 


3 


Meister, Bunny Young 


X 


X 


3 


Moltz, Sandra 


X 


X 


3 


Perry, Gerard D. 


X 


X 


3 


Richard, Dianne 


X 


X 


3 


Sachs-Freeman, Barbara 


X 


X 


3 


Sainato, Maryann 


X 


o 


3 


Sheehan, Neil G. 


X 


X 


3 


Stone, James S. Sr. 


X 


X 


3 


Thomsen, Maureen 


X 


o 


3 


Vogel, John M. 


o 


X 


3 


Vogel, Kristen S. 


X 


X 


3 


Weaver, David 


X 


X 


3 


Webster, Mary 


X 


X 


3 


Welch, Thomas F. 





X 


3 


White-DePaolo, Jan 


o 


X 


3 


Wright, Suzanne 


X 


X 


3 


Zeman, Cynthia 


X 


X 



104 



2002 Swampscott Town Meeting Attendance 



Pre 


Name 


5/6/02 


5/7/02 


4 


Anderson, Dana 


X 


X 


4 


Baker, Janet N. 


X 


X 


4 


Balliro, Anita 


X 


X 


4 


Balsama, Joseph J, 


X 


X 


4 


Barden, Marc 


X 


X 


4 


Cassidy, Francis J. Jr. 








4 


Cassidy, Marilyn T. 


X 





4 


Cecil, Sarah P. 


X 





4 


Dawley, Thomas 


X 


X 


•4 


DeChillo, Mary H. 


X 


X 


4 


DiMento, Carol A.G. 


X 





4 


DiMento, William R. 


X 


X 


4 


Donelan, Robert E. 


X 


X 


4 


Donnelfeld, Neil 








4 


Drummond, Brian J. 


X 


X 


4 


Drummond, Ellen M. 


X 


X 


4 


Duffy, Pauline 








4 


Faico, Michael 


X 


X 


4 


Foley, Phyllis Serafini 


X 


X 


4 


Goldman, Iris 


X 


X 


4 


Goudreau, Connie 


X 


X 


4 


Hall, David 


X 


X 


4 


Hughes, Jack 


X 





4 


Hughes, Nancy T. 


X 


X 


4 


Johnson, Anne 


X 


X 


4 


Keeter, Terri 


X 


X 


4 


Krippendorf, Edward W. Sr. 


X 


X 


4 


Leger, Jeanne 


X 


X 


4 


McClung, Michael D. 


X 


X 


4 


McNerney, Cynthia 


X 


X 


4 


Meninno, Christine 


X 


X 


4 


Morretti, Nunzio 


X 


X 


4 


O'Brien, Laurie 


X 


X 


4 


Paster, Jack L. 


X 


X 


4 


Phelan, John V. Ill 


X 


X 


4 


Poska, Matthew 


X 


X 


4 


Powell, Amy 


X 


X 


4 


Reagan, John 


X 


X 


4 


Santanello, Daniel 


X 


X 


4 


Scibelli, Anthony A. 





X 


4 


Scolamiero, Dennis M. 


X 


X 


4 


Shanahan, Patricia D. 


X 


X 


4 


Shanahan, William E. 


X 


X 


4 


Shore, Geraldine J. 


X 


X 


4 


Shore, Warren 


X 


X 


4 


Somer, Margaret A. 


X 


X 


4 


Squires, Deborah 


X 


X 


4 


Squires, John Jr. 


X 


X 


4 


Stone, Myron S. 


X 


X 


4 


Vaucher, Catherine M. 


X 


X 


4 


Wagner, Elizabeth Swift 


X 


X 


4 


Watts, Jody 








4 


Weaver, Sharon 


X 


X 


4 


Withrow, Marysusan Buckley 




X 



105 



2002 Swampscott Town Meeting Attendance 



Pre 


Name 


5/6/02 


5/7/02 


5 


Akim, Marta 










Belhumeur, Cynthia Hatch 





X 


\J 


Relhumpur Thomas R 


X 


X 


5 


Bermani, Doris P. 


X 


X 


5 


Rurkp Sroti Dounlas 


X 


X 


5 


Bush, Fred 


X 


X 


5 


Caplan, Edward 


X 





5 


Carannelo 1 isa 


X 


X 


c; 


Darr Heather M 


X 


X 




Cerra Anthonv W Jr 


X 





5 


Dhanman Randv 


X 


o 


5 


Gonnollv 1 oretta 


X 


X 


5 


Oronlev Rark'strnm Nanrv M 





o 


5 


Devlin Michael K 

l_y V^Villlf IVIIwll LA \-r 1 1 \ . 


X 


X 


5 


Fnrman Amv 

1 \y 1 1 1 1 1.4 1 1 t / M 1 1 y 








5 


(Earner Ronald 

\^ 1 1 1 W 1 , 11 W 1 I t-A 1 V_J 


X 





5 


r^il npcjrpp 








5 


Goldman Gharles 

\ A \_/ 1 \J 1 1 1 U 1 1 f V ' 1 1 \^ 1 1 w w 


X 





5 


Goldsmith Alice 

V-^ \J 1 \wJ V./|||ILII> / \ll X-/ 


X 


X 


5 


Mpnnpccpv William F 

1 I 1 1 1 1 O y t * * 1 1 1 1 III 1 


X 


X 


5 


Jancsv John F 

\J LA 1 1 O y 1 \J w 1 1 1 1 1 


X 


X 


5 


Karwowski, John R. 


X 


X 


5 


Lawler, John 


X 


X 


5 


Lawler, Sami 


X 


X 


5 


Levy, Eric 


X 


X 


5 


Lewis, Susan E. 


X 


X 


5 


1 inson Philin 

1 1 \j >-/ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f~f 


X 


X 


5 


Nellis, Veeder C. 


X 


X 


5 


Patkin, Randall 


X 


X 


5 


Potash, Leola 


X 


X 


5 


Pye, Darlene 


X 


X 


5 


Reardon, Carl 


X 


X 


5 


Reichert, Leslie E. 





X 


5 


Rodenstein Claudia 


X 


X 


5 


Rogers, Roberta C. 


X 


X 


5 


Ro"^sman Neil 

1 1 V-^ O O 1 1 1 U 1 I t 1 1 v.-* 1 1 








5 


Rubin Ken 


X 


X 


5 


Samilijan, Peter 





X 


5 


Sneirson, Gerald 


X 


X 


5 


Snarlos Marv Anne 

v-^ \A 1 iv_/ X.' 1 IVI 1 y /Mill w 


X 


X 


5 


Steinman, Roy 








5 


Stephens, Thomas J. 





o 


5 


Sullivan Jill 


X 


X 


5 


Talkov, Roger 


X 


X 


5 


Toner, Colleen 


X 





5 


Tripolsky, Sharon Jaffe 


X 


X 


5 


Van Dam, David S. 


X 


X 


5 


Vanderhurn 1 inso 

V U 1 1 \-r 1 ly 1 ] I— II lO W 


X 


X 


5 


Wavnp Kenneth 

V V u y ■ ' 1 ' > x^ 1 11 1 III 


X 


X 


5 


Wilson Catherine 

* V 1 1 \J 1 1 , \^ I 1 1 1 1 1 1 


X 


X 


5 


Wirr^tnn AIipp Janp 

V » II 1 O I W 1 1 , f\l 1 ^-i" W U 1 1 ^ 


X 


X 


5 


Zarinsky, Irma 


X 


X 


5 


Zeller, David E. 


X 


X 


5 


Zuchero, William R. 


X 


X 



106 



2002 Swampscott Town Meeting Attendance 



Pre 


Name 


5/6/02 


5/7/02 


6 


Baker, Robert 


O 


o 


6 


Bayard, Susan 


X 


X 


6 


Block, Ina-Lee 


X 


X 


6 


Block, Lawrence S. 


X 


X 


6 


Burgess, Sue 


X 


X 


6 
6 


Burke, Michael F 


X 


X 


Cassidy, Reid J. 


X 


X 


6 


Cassidy-Driscoll, Tara L. 


X 


X 


6 


Cohen, Irwin F. 





X 


6 


Dembowski, Claire C. 





X 


6 


Derr, Jo Ann Simons 


X 


X 


6 


DiLisio, Robert 


X 


X 


6 


Driscoll, Thomas H. Jr. 


X 


X 


6 


Dussault, Barbara 


X 





6 


Eriich, Norman 


X 


X 


6 


Gold, Anne W 


X 


X 


6 


Goldberg, Arthur 


X 


X 


6 


Goldman, Jeffrey W. 


X 


X 


6 


Gorman, Paul J. 


X 


X 


6 


Gupta, Mary Kelley 


X 


X 


6 


Horwitz, Patricia Kravtin 





X 


6 


Kane, Susan K 


X 


X 


6 


Klayman, Nancy 


X 


X 


6 


Koidin, Jill 


X 


X 


6 


Levenson, Paul E. 


X 


X 


6 


Levenson, Sheryl 


X 


X 


6 


Locke, Judith E 


X 


X 


6 


Markarian, Joseph 


X 


X 


6 


Merkle, Cynthia 


X 


X 


6 


Nigrelli, Eugene 


X 


X 


6 


O'Hare, Mary Michael 


X 


X 


6 


Paster, Marc 


X 


X 


6 


Paster, Ruth 


o 


X 


6 


Pelletier, Maria 


X 


X 


6 


Pitman, Martha 


X 


X 


6 


Polison, Sharon 


X 


X 


6 


Rotner, Philip 


X 


X 


6 


Ryan, Daniel H. 


X 


X 


6 


Sackett, Shelly A. 


X 


X 


6 


Schultz, Jim 


X 


X 


6 


Seligman, Edward 


X 


X 


6 


Shulkin, Catherine 


X 


X 


6 


Shulkin, Randall S. 


X 


X 


6 


Shutzer, Carole B 


X 


X 


6 


Shutzer, Kenneth B. 


X 


X 


6 


Sims, Bobbye Lou 


X 


X 


6 


Valle, Michele M. 


o 


X 


6 


Walsh, Kerin T. 


X 


X 


6 


Watson, Brian T 


X 


X 


6 


Weaver, Walter 


X 





6 


Witt, Sherrie Lynn 


X 


X 


6 


Yaeger, Dan 


X 


X 


6 


Yaeger, Lisa L 


X 


X 


6 


Yellin, Benjamin 


X 


X 



107 



TOWN COLLECTOR and COLLECTOR OF TAXES 






JACK L. PASTER 






IN ACCOUNT WITH THE TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT - 1/1/2001 


to 6/30/2002 








COLLECTIONS: 






ncdl l—oidic 1 clAt;o 


$ 37,632,003.00 




$ 


465,573.66 


Tav Xitio r^nl IciptinnQ 

1 CIA 1 IlltJ v>'Ullt;OllUI lo 


$ 


53,774.15 


DofcirrpH T^y r^nllpptinriQ 

U/ 1 C? M CLJ 1 dA \J 1 1 tJU IUJI lo 


$ 


4,771.53 


Aiitomohilp Fypicp Tsypq 

M U lUI 1 IVJU 1 1 C CALrlOC 1 ClACo 


$ 


1,782,525.65 


\A/ptpr/Qp\A/pr f^nllpptinnQ 

V V die 1 / oc VV C 1 OUIICOUUI lo 


$ 


4,305,146.91 


\A/3tpr Qpr\/ipp ("IhprnPQ 
vvdid oci vioc vyiidiyc/o 


$ 


13,670.26 


Harhor Mnnrinn Fppq 
1 idi ivi\j\j\ 11 1^ r ooo 


I 


21,445.00 


Rnat Fypi^^p T^ypq 

1 / w Cl L I — AOlOw 1 Ci A O O 


$ 


13,644.75 


Tr3<ih f^nllpf^tion Pppq 


$ 


648.69 






NOTE- 




Intprp^t/rhpirnp<^/rlpmr^ nrl fpp^ Pirp inrliirlpri in thp ?ihn\/p finiirpQ 

II llC7lwOL/V^i idi O/ VJwiilCliiVJ IC7wO Cliw liiOiCIUOVJ III lilO dkJKJVX^ II^LII C70 








DpnprtmpntPil AppniintQ Rpppi\/p^hlp«^' 
LJK^ijai 11 1 Id iicii rAOwv-'LJi no ricod V ciL/ioo . 








Dept. Receipts received through Collector's "CASH" System 


$ 


840,531.51 


Veteran Pension Reimbursements 


$ 


23,025.48 


Mnn-Onntrihi itnr\/ Rpimhi irQPmpntQ 
iN<jii wji ill luu ivji y nci 1 1 luu I oci 1 ici 1 lo 


$ 


3,231.05 


Srhonl Tiiitinn<> 


$ 


989,846.72 


Rentals (Fish House, DAR etc) 


$ 


32,774.00 


Fire Alarm Box Fees 


$ 


13,024.00 






Other interest/charges/demand fees/RMV mark&clear fees 


$ 


19,735.99 


Fees for preparing Certificates of Municipal Lien 


$ 


42,825.00 


Fines assessed on Returned Checks 


$ 


3,473.18 


Interest earned on Collector's Cash Management account 


$ 


21,145.72 


Total Collected - January 1 , 2001 to June 30, 2002 


$ 46,282,816.25 



108 



TREASURER 

Jack L. Paster 



Treasurer's Cash Statement 

In account with the Town of Swampscott: 

Balance on hand January 1 , 2001 : $ 8,323,670 

Receipts and income from all sources: $ 65,484,483 

Less warrants paid (payroll and vendor): $ 63,173,922 

Balance on hand June 30, 2002: $ 10,634,231 

Interest income earned 1/1/2001 to 6/30/2002: $ 484,609 

TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT TRUST and SPECIAL FUNDS 



Fund ID Balance Deposits Interest Withdrawls Balance 

1/1/01 Income 6/30/02 



Cemtery Gifts & Bequeaths 


$ 


151,315 


$ 




$ 


9,053 


$ 


45,377 


$ 


114,991 


Cemetery Perpetual Care 


$ 


354,992 


$ 


43,200 


$ 


22,293 


$ 


106,945 


$ 


313.540 


Library General Library Trust 


$ 


65,530 


$ 




$ 


4,162 


$ 


2.453 


$ 


67,239 


Library - Linscott Trust 


$ 


141,078 


$ 




$ 


8,599 


$ 


28,898 


$ 


120,779 


Library - Hussey Trust 


$ 


99,634 


$ 




$ 


5,959 


$ 


29,176 


$ 


76.417 


Library - Johnson Trust 


$ 


142 


$ 




$ 


7 


$ 


105 


$ 


44 


Police - Dare Account 


$ 


69,286 


$ 


10,690 


$ 


4,359 


$ 


21,587 


$ 


62.748 


Police - Community Police 


$ 


90,654 


$ 


84,416 


$ 


6,340 


$ 


128,667 


$ 


52,743 


Police - Cops More 96 


$ 


120,100 


$ 


24,146 


$ 


6,786 


$ 


150,569 


$ 


463 


Police - Cops Fast 


$ 


111,315 


$ 




$ 


5,363 


$ 


116,310 


$ 


368 


Police - Drug Enforcement 


$ 


7,431 


$ 


838 


$ 


458 


$ 


2,451 


$ 


6,276 


Police - Law Enforcement 


$ 


3,454 


$ 




$ 


219 


$ 


164 


$ 


3.509 


Police - Sch Resource Officer 


$ 




$ 


52,081 


$ 


195 


$ 




$ 


52.276 


Stabilization Account 


$ 


664,980 


$ 


541,500 


$ 


43,189 


$ 


497,753 


$ 


751.916 


Conservation Fund 


$ 


73,833 


$ 


1,837 


$ 


4,705 


$ 


4,775 


$ 


75.600 


Phillips Medal 


$ 


2,656 


$ 


327 


$ 


175 


$ 




$ 


3.158 


MWRA Program 


$ 


269,612 


$ 




$ 


13,383 


$ 


254,436 


$ 


28.559 


Performance Bonds 


$ 


85,039 


$ 


184,832 


$ 


8,631 


$ 


112,661 


$ 


165.841 


War Memorial Fund 


$ 


113,683 


$ 


6,100 


$ 


7,294 


$ 


4.400 


$ 


122,677 




$ 


2,424,734 


$ 


949,967 


$ 


151,170 


$ 


1,506,727 


$ 


2,019,144 



109 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 

The following is the Fiscal Year 2001 -year end Balance Sheet, Combined Statement of Revenues 
and Expenditures, Statement of Revenues and Expenditures (Budget to Actual) and Statement or 
Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance-Nonexpendable Trust Funds. 



110 



I 1(5 



in 00 00 CM 01 ^ 

CM <Ni 00 01 O) 

CNJ in CD CD 

t£> r-' CM CD 00" 00' 

CM (D O) o 

CM ^ ^ ^ CD 



n Tf o o CD 

^ - - 

CD ^ 

CO CO go' ■«t' 
CO O CO 

CM CNj 



1^ CM in in 00 

(D »- 00 O CO 

O) o CO in 
o in" r-." h-' 

CM »n 00 0> CM 
CM CO to CD 

in 

CM 



o o 
•- in 
00 



d p o 



o> cn 



t o 
CO 



II 



cj in 

»- 00 

O CO 

eg in 

in 00 

CO CD 



2 t5 



11 



Q. 

o 
cc 

O K 

Ix 
o 

O lU 

o o 

< z 

5 < 

< CO 
(O Q 

3 O 



in CO (X> CM 

CM CM 00 O) 

CM m O) 



CM 



CO •- 

O CM 

CD in 
00" o' 
^ 5 



^ — CM 



00 CO o 
»- O CM 
»- O CO 

in 00" go' co' 
in o -T o 

h- cm r- 



o o 

o to 

o cm 

o co' 

hi CO 



5 O 



OC I- 111 3 S 



5 ? ? Ql 



S to 

5 O 

H P 

lU < 

OC C) 

DC li 

O CD 

u- O 

y LU 

> H 

O o 

°- o 

ID -I 

CD _, 



Is 

io 

< 



0) Q) 



UJ 2 -o a, n ^ 

P i t 2 Z <" 

5 S - " Jc ? 

< 5 Q cc O CD 



to ^ 

i 5 I 
, £ UJ z CO 



_ E 

O Ul 



UJ t 
3 < 



111 



ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES. EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2001 






Governmental Fund Types 




Fiduciary 
Fund Type 






General 


Special Debt 
Revenue Service 


Capital 
Pro)ects 


Expendable 
Trusts 


Total 
(Memorandum 
Only) 


REVENUES 
Real estate and personal property taxes, 

net of reserve lor abatements $ 
Excise taxes 
Intergovernmental 
User charges 
Departmental and other 
Investment income 


22,876,532 $ 
1,882,221 
7,216,399 
3,102,531 
1,273,484 
426,987 


- $ - $ 

1,317,237 
2,337,837 


- $ 


- S 

33,364 
49,685 


22,876.532 
1.882.221 
8.533.636 
3.102,531 
3.644,685 
476,672 


TOTAL REVENUES 


36.778,154 


3,655,074 




83,049 


40,516,277 


EXPENDITURES: 
Current 

General government 

Public safety 

Education 

Public works 

Human services 

Culture and recreation 

Community development 

Pension benefits 

Employee benefits 
State and county assessments 
Debt service: 

Pnncipal 

Interest 


1.835,280 
4,595.004 
15,043,157 
3,433,348 
1,113,669 
522,086 

4,884,506 
1,944,475 
602,870 

1,839,587 
1,054,457 


13,823 
683,491 
2,772,988 
458.639 
21,444 
43,953 


96,656 
53,719 
692,790 
448,854 

41.714 


4,900 

1,500 

32,290 
114 


1.950.659 
5.332,214 
18,508,935 
4,342.341 
1.135.113 

640.043 
114 
4.884.506 
1,944.475 

602,870 

1 .839.587 
1.054.457 


TOTAL EXPENDITURES 


36,868,439 


3,994,338 


1.333,733 


38.804 


42.235.314 


EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES 
OVER EXPENDITURES 


(90,285) 


(339,264) 


(1,333,733) 


44,245 


(1.719.037) 


OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES): 
Proceeds from issuance of tx3nds and notes 
Operating transfers in 
Operating transfers out 


205,900 
(80,000) 


560,000 
60,322 

(155,900) 


1,615,000 
80,000 


(110.322) 


2,175.000 
346.222 
(346,222) 


TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) 


125,900 


620.322 (155,900) 


1,695.000 


(110.322) 


2,175,000 


EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES AND OTHER 
FINANCING SOURCES (USES) OVER EXPENDITURES 


35,615 


281,058 (155,900) 


361.267 


(66.077) 


455,963 


FUND BALANCES AT BEGINNING OF YEAR (as restated) 


3,508,612 


1,298,679 253.005 


1.814,480 


1.233,582 


8,108,358 


FUND BALANCES AT END OF YEAR $ 


3,544,227 $ 


1,579,737 $ 97.105 $ 


2.175.747 $ 


1,167,505 $ 


8.554,321 



See notes to general purpose financial statements. 



112 



GENERAL FUND 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 
BUDGETARY BASIS - BUDGET AND ACTUAL 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2001 



Variance 
Favorable 



REVENUES: 
Real estate and personal property taxes, 

net of reserve for abatements 
Excise taxes 
Intergovernmental 
User cfiarges 
Departmental and othier 
Investment income 

TOTAL REVENUES 

EXPENDITURES: 
Current: 

General government 

Public safety 

Education 

Public works 

Human services 

Culture and recreation 

Pension benefits 

Employee benefits 
State and county assessments 
Debt service: 

Principal 

Interest 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES OVER EXPENDITURES 

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES): 
Operating transfers in 
Operating transfers out 
Overlay reversions 
Use of unreserved fund balance 

TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) 

EXCESS OF REVENUES AND OTHER FINANCING 
SOURCES (USES) OVER EXPENDITURES 



Budget 


Actual 


(Unfavorable) 


22,448,734 $ 


23.039,312 


$ 590.578 


1,559,540 


1,882,221 


322,681 


3,844,529 


3,938,838 


94,309 


3,516,601 


3,102,531 


(414,070) 


689,172 


1,273,484 


584,312 


470,836 


426,987 


(43,849) 


32,529,412 


33,663,373 


1,133,961 


1,904,511 


1,850,873 


53,638 


4,780,787 


4,623,177 


157,610 


15,064,802 


15,042,530 


22,272 


3,120,209 


3,099,733 


20,476 


1,205,992 


1,135,660 


70.332 


523,207 


506,088 


17,119 


2,091,281 


2,071,944 


19,337 


1,953,146 


1,953,146 




524,555 


602,870 


(78,315) 


1,839,587 


1,839,587 




599,235 


589,457 


9,778 


33,607,312 


33,315,065 


292,247 


(1,077,900) 


348.308 


1,426,208 


205,900 


205,900 




(80,000) 


(80,000) 




80,000 


80,000 




872,000 


872,000 




1,077,900 


1.077.900 




- $ 


1,426,208 


$ 1,426,208 



See notes to general purpose financial statements. 



113 



NONEXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2001 



CONTRIBUTIONS $ 19,770 

E 

c FUND BALANCE, Beginning of year 332,242 

si FUND BALANCE, End of year $ 352,012 



See notes to general purpose financial statements. 



114 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



Neil G Sheehan. Chairman Michael A. Tumulty, Assistant Assessor 

John V. Phelan, III Secretary Pamela R Hogan, Clerk 

Vera H. Harrington Linda L. Paster, Clerk 

In accordance with Article 4 Section 2 of the by-laws of the Town of Swampscott, the 
Board of Assessors herewith submits its annual report to the citizens of the Town of Swampscott 
for the fiscal year 2002 

Additionally, in recognition of the town's 150'^ anniversary the Board wishes to submit an 
historical perspective of taxation over the past 150 years. 

SWAMPSCOTT THEN 

According to folklore, Indians called this place M'gumpskut, and it was known as a good 
fishing site. Historians have disputed the exact word meaning, but all agree it includes reference 
to a rock. English pronunciation soon changed the form to be called Swampscott. 

In 1634, 1400 acres of Swampscott was known as the domain of Sachem Poquanum. 
Two years prior to this, however, the Massachusetts Great and General Court had granted this 
same amount of land to John Humphrey the first deputy governor of Massachusetts Bay Co. 
Humphrey was a leader of the Dorchester Company, a patentee of and a close friend of Governor 
John Winthrop, John Humphrey returned to England in 1641, selling his land to Deborah Moody 
of Salem. Lady Moody sold it to Daniel King of Lynn in 1649. 

On May 12, 1852, the Great and General Court incorporated Swampscott as a separate 
town from Lynn, with four miles of shoreline and many hills rising to 180 feet above sea level. 
The report of the Audit Committee of that time stated, "The expenses of separation from Lynn and 
the Act of Incorporation of the town will not again occur, yet, including this extra expense the 
expenditures have been so far below the amount of assessed and collected in Swampscott that 
the treasurer has been able to pay more than one half of the debt apportioned to Swampscott in 
the settlement with the City of Lynn. At the time of Incorporation the Humphrey Grant was 
increased by 653 acres taken from the City of Lynn, The population at the time was estimated to 
have been about 900 The number of Polls was 300. The estimated real estate value was set at 
$500,000. Those chosen to administer taxation were, J. F. Philips, Thomas Stone Jr , Allen 
Washburn. As Surveyors of Highway, Washburn and Philips were chosen to also act as 
Assessors. Swampscott grew to its present size of 3.05 square miles in 1867 when 68 acres 
were added from the City of Salem. 

The town directory of 1856 gave the occupations of 360 Swampscott residents as: 75 
shoemakers who were working in small shops in the upper part of town; 30 farms in the lowlands 
of the Beach Bluff area; more than 200 fishermen or workers in related industries as boat 
building, drying cod to make dun fish, processing cod liver oil, and making sou'westers. The total 
population was then 1,335, and a dozen or more large estates occupied much of the town. 

In addition to land and houses the following were taxed; money, tillage land, pasture 
land, store, cows, horses, stock in trade, bank and railroad stock, boats and boat houses, 
shipping, furniture, schooners, insurance, shares owned specified by a fraction. 



1852 Total Assessment (Approximately) 



Personal $150,000 
Real $500,000 
Polls $ 1 50 X 300 = $450. 

As of 1852 the town tax rate was on $4.60 



In 1888 a prominent tract of ocean front land was the 130-acre E. Redington Mudge 
estate. It was divided, and the famous landscape architect Frederich Law Olmstead designed the 
Monument Avenue area On adjoining Mudge land now stands the home of Elihu Thomson, an 
inventor and founder of General Electric Company. Built in 1889, the home was purchased for 
use as the Town Administration Building in 1944. In 1976 the Building was selected as a National 



115 



Historic Landmark. Not far away at 23 Paradise Road is the home where Mary Baker founder of 
Christian Science, lived in 1886. 

In 1896, the Fish House was built on Fisherman's Beach. It was built to replace many 
individual huts fishermen used for sorting catch and storing tackle. Town fathers thought a clear 
beach would be more attractive to a growing community to those interested in pleasure boating 
and bathing. Still in use today, the Fish House exhibits the Town seal, carved on a gable of the 
building. The seal shows a fisherman. James Phillips, at the tiller of the "Dove" first Swampscott 
owned schooner. The famous Swampscott Dory was first built here in 1841, and for many years 
was used in fishing areas worldwide. Fishing and lobstering are still a part of the Swampscott 
economy. 

Swampscott convened its first open Town Meeting on June 5, 1852. The number of 
voters at the first town meeting was 155. Seventy-five years later in 1927, as the population 
approached 10,000, a representative form of Town Meeting was adopted. The town is now 
divided into six precincts and each elects 54 Meeting members, one third each year for a three- 
year term to serve without compensation. 

Today, Swampscott is primarily a residential suburb of approximately 14,000, but it was 
once known as a resort area with many summer hotels. The most widely known, the New Ocean 
House attracted vacationers and conventions until the large and beautiful structure was destroyed 
by fire in 1968. President Calvin Coolidge as a summer White House in 1925 used another 
called White Court, an estate on Little's Point. President Roosvelt and Winston Churchill signed 
the Atlantic Charter here in 1941. It presently houses Marian Court College. 

SWAMPSCOTT NOW 

Fiscal year 2002 was also historically significant. For the first time the total value of all 
real estate in Swampscott exceeded $2 billion. Real estate values continued to rise with the 
average assessment rising 27%. For the first time since the adoption of proposition 2 72, the town 
passed a general override of $2.4 million dollars. As a result, tax bills in FY2002 realized an 
average increase of nearly 15%. 

Mr. Neil G. Sheehan was elected to a three-year term and at the organizational meeting 
was voted chairman. Mr. John V. Phelan III assumed the position of secretary. Mrs. Vera 
Harrington complete her 41^' year of service to the town. Assistant Assessor, Michael Tumulty, 
was elected president of the Essex County Assessors Association representing 34 communities 
in the county. 

The senior abatement work-off program is in its third year and has been extraordinarily 
successful in providing tax relief up to $500. for the elderly. In fiscal year 2002, there were 18 
participants for a total of $7437 in work-off abatements. 

In a joint meeting on December 4, 2002. the Board of Selectmen once again voted to 
maintain a split tax rate. The approved rates for fiscal year 2002 are $13.13 per thousand for 
residential property and $23.56 per thousand for commercial, industrial, and personal property. 

The Board of Assessors wishes to express its appreciation to Executive Secretary Patt 
George, David Castellarin, Denise Dembkoski, and Jack Paster for their cooperation and 
assistance throughout the year. 

EXCISE TAX TOTAL 
Number of vehicles 13,842 
Excise tax $1,765,232. 

Statutory Exemptions of real estate, which is mandatory under Chapter 59, MGL, totaled 
$96,088.91 to 230 qualified homeowners. 

The Board of Assessors herewith submits its figures used to determine the tax rate for 
fiscal year 2002. 

Respectfully submitted, 
BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Neil G. Sheehan, Chairman 
John V. Phelan, III Secretary 
Vera H. Harrington 



116 



THE COMMOhWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE 
FISCAL 2002 TAX LEVY LIMITATION FOR 

SWAMPSCOTT 
FOR BUDGEt PLANNING PURPOSES 



I. TO CALCULATE THE FY2001 LEVY LIMIT 

A. FY2000 Levy Limit 

A1 ADD Amended FY2000 Growth 

B. ADD ( lA + IA1 ) X 2.5% 

C. ADDFY2001 New Growth 

D. ADD FY2001 Override 

E. FY2001 Subtotal 

F. FY2001 Levy Ceiling 

II. TO CALCULATE THE FY2002 LEVY LIMIT 

A. FY2001 Levy Limit from I. 

A1 ADD Amended FY2001 Growth 

B. ADD (IIA + IIA1 )X2.5% 

C. ADD FY2002 New Growth 

D. ADD FY2002 Override 

E. FY2002 Subtotal 

F. FY2002 Levy Ceiling 



III. TO CALCULATE THE FY2002 
MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE LEVY 



21,186,433 







529,661 



154.517 







21,870.611 



37,528,248 



21.870.611 







546,765 



180.347 



2,469.790 



25.067.513 



47,012,686 



2l,870,6lt; 



FY2001 Levy Limit 



25,067,513 



FY2002 Levy Limit 



A. FY20G2 Levy Limit from II. 

B. FY2002 Debt Exclusion(s) 

C. FY2002 Capital Expenditure Exclusion(s) 

D. FY2002 Other Adjustment 

E. FY2002 Water / Sewer 

F. FY2002 Maximum Allowable Levy 



25,067.513 



992.814 



.26.060.327 



117 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 



Kenneth B. Shutzer, Esquire, Chairman 
Anthony Scibelli, Esquire, Vice-Chairman 

Robert Baker David Janes, Clerk 

Joseph A. MacDonald, Esquire 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS: 

Michael Gorenstein Edward M. Breed 

The Zoning Board of Appeals held 20 hearings during the fiscal year ending June 30, 2002; 115 
new petitions were filed, 68 approved, 6 withdrawn, 2 denied and 29 continued for further hearing. We 
would like to thank Kevin Goggin, the former full-time Inspector of Buildings, for his technical support and 
assistance, Helen M. Collins, his administrative assistant and Richard Mcintosh, acting inspector. The 
Associate Members of the Board contributed valuable expertise to the Board The Board's Secretary, 
Linda Paster has been invaluable to the Board for her thoroughness and professionalism and by the 
assistance shown to Petitioners. 

The Board wishes to acknowledge Michael Gorenstein and Edward M. Breed as Associate 
Members of the Board. In addition, Kenneth B. Shutzer was reappointed to a five (5) year term as a 
regular member. Edward M. Breed was reappointed to a two (2) year term as an associate member. 

In the course of the last twenty (20) hearings and numerous new and continued petitions, the 
Board periodically identifies an issue(s) having greater and more profound impact than the property on 
which it is situated. In that regard, the Board notes the continued importance of the adoption of the new 
Swampscott Zoning By-Law, which was unanimously approved at Town Meeting. As with all revisions 
there are certain unforeseen refinements, changes and modifications which will periodically be presented 
to Town Meeting for their review in an attempt to continue to refine and improve upon our current Zoning 
By-Law. In this regard, the Board of Appeals thanks all of the members of the Zoning By-Law Review 
Committee who have tirelessly over the last year sought the input of the Board of Appeals and Planning 
Board in its attempt to define incongruities and inconsistencies unforeseen when the current By-Law was 
remanded by Town Meeting back to the Planning Board for further study. 

Another area of interest concerns the status of municipal legislation to restrict local control of low 
and moderate income housing pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40B, commonly 
referred to as the "Anti-Snob Zoning Act." The act provides for an expedited heanng and review 
procedure for low and moderate income housing proposals. Qualified applicants file an application for a 
single "comprehensive permit" with the Zoning Board of Appeals rather than filing individual applications 
with each local agency or official having jurisdiction over every aspect of the proposal. The critical 
element of this process is the power given the Board of Appeals to override local requirements and 
regulations that are not "consistent with local needs." Additionally, the act although obligated to 
encourage or require developers to fund or construct affordable housing, is now being used as a vehicle 
to expend the perimeters of local zoning by-laws by permitting the Board of Appeals to supersede local 
zoning by-law regulations through the comprehensive permitting process. The unsuccessful applicant, if 
denied the permit by the Board of Appeals, can appeal the denial of the permit or the conditions imposed 
in a permit, to the Housing Appeal Committee (HAC), a state agency within the Department of Housing 
and Community Development. The scope of this process and the complexity of the procedure have 
resulted in Board Members attending Chapter 40B instructional seminars to better prepare for the 
application(s) which appear to be in the pipeline. 

A recurring issue is the interrelationship between existing structures in a residential district, 
especially one involving an expansion in size and its impact on abutting properties. That issue was 
directly explored as an outgrowth of a Petition to demolish a pre-existing structure and the rebuilding of 
same on a lot formerly occupied by a smaller building mindful of the improvement the new structure would 
represent to the area (the Beach Club). It is in this regard that the Board is cognizant of an ever- 
increasing trend in densely populated and desirable towns to demolish and rebuild larger structures which 
may or may not be in keeping with the public sentiment or character of the area. Matters such as this can 
not be viewed in a vacuum and require the input and vigilant oversight of both the Selectmen and 
Planning Board (site plan review) to insure that the introduction of any new growth is not at the expense 
of its residential abutters or for that matter, existing businesses. 



118 



A unique aspect of Swampscott's demographics and zoning districts is the introduction of a dozen 
or more grandfathered business lots and pre-existing usage which abut residential neighborhoods This 
issue, albeit problematic is best handled on an individual case by case basis to structure a systematic 
inter-relationship on a site specific basis. Crafting such decisions mindful of the concerns voiced by 
neighbors requires comprehensive review and detailed reasoning to minimize the potential risk of 
extensive court litigation It is with that charge that the Board of Appeals views its responsibility to adopt 
the needs of the public, which is serves. 

The Board through its Chair, wishes to personally thank the Chairman of the Zoning By-Law 
Review Committee Robert Baker and the tireless efforts of its members, who systematically incorporated 
the revisions mandated by the Attorney General's Office and with the help of Jack Paster and Mark 
McHugh have enabled the web savvy to avail themselves of the current Zoning By-Law. The Board in 
particular believes that the new streamlined and demystified Zoning By-Law provides for a more cogent 
and user-friendly document to the individual applicant. 

With the potential for new or redefined growth, the Board encourages participation both in 
neighborhood issues as well as matters, which have the potential for Town wide impact. The Board 
therefore, continues to encourage individual participation at the Public Hearings. 

Issues such as these and other matters have enormous import to the Town requiring exhaustive 
review and deliberations The Board welcomes the opportunity to serve the Town in this capacity as well 
as the special permit requests by individual homeowners. 

The Board acknowledges the difficult decisions which it is called upon to render but can state its 
decisions have generally withstood the scrutiny of the Courts and have ultimately resulted in fewer 
appeals and reduced costs to the Town both legal and otherwise. 

The Board further appreciates the professionalism shown to it by members of the Bar and 
individuals who appear on their own behalf in the preparation of petitions and supporting documentation 
as requested. 

Kenneth B. Shutzer was reelected Chairman, Anthony Scibelli elected Vice-Chairman, and 
Robert Baker elected Clerk of the Board. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Chairman, 

Kenneth B. Shutzer, Esquire 



119 



COMPUTER ANALYST 



Being appointed as Swampscott's first Computer Analyst was very exciting for me. I 
began working here with many thoughts and aspirations for what this Town was capable ol and 
now looking back over the past two years; I am very pleased with the outcome. 

During the last two years the Town's financial software took a major overhaul. MUNIS, 
software we use, was converted and upgraded to a 4"^ Generational Language with a Graphical 
User Interface (or the ability to point and click with a mouse). 

The conversions began with Payroll, then to Real Estate and Personal Property Tax, 
continuing on with Utility Billing, and finally with the implementation of Motor Vehicle Excise Tax. 
By now using fully integrated software, billings and collections hit the general ledger daily, 
allowing the Town Accountant to keep up to date balances. The abatement and refund 
processes have been streamlined to allow for quicker processing and a more timely turnaround 
process. 

In addition to the software being updated, there was a need to update many of the pc's in 
the Town Hall Most of the offices received new, updated pc's, with more memory and larger disk 
capacity. In addition to updating the pc's, I was able to give new pc's to departments that did not 
have them in the past or those that would benefit from an additional pc. All offices in the Town 
Hall currently have pc capabilities. We added new networking connections to allow all 
department heads access to the Town's network. I was also able to add a second counter 
terminal in the Assessor's Office, allowing a better flow of counter inquiries. 

Last April, we converted the old Retirement office into a computer room. The Financial 
Server and the network cables, switches, and patch panels, were moved into an air-conditioned, 
secure room. We then purchased a Windows NT Server, and brought internet access to the 
Town Hall. I wrote up Policies and Procedures for E-Mail and the Internet, and once the Board of 
Selectmen adopted those policies, the Town Hall Department Heads were granted access to both 
e-mail and the internet, provided they signed a copy of the policies. This past May, the 
Assessor's Patriot server was moved up to the computer room, and I recently added a firewall, 
thus creating a centralized and secure nucleus for the Town's Computer System. 

In October 2001, Special Town Meeting approved funding to allow me to network the 
Town of Swampscott buildings. Fiber has been run from the Town Hall Computer Room to the 
Library, Fire Station, Police Station, Senior Center, Town Hall Annex, and High School 
Administration, This project is almost complete and within the next month all off site departments 
wills be able to utilize the resources available at the Town Hall, Those resources include, e-mail, 
internet access, the Munis server, and the Patriot Server, 

In addition to the above, my responsibilities for the Town of Swampscott include: 
processing of the Town and School payroll, managing the Town's health, dental, and life 
insurance, and I recently acquired the Workman's Compensation, I handle the printing of all the 
Real Estate, Personal Property, and Water/Sewer bills, as well as designing and ordenng all of 
the bill stock. I assist offices with streamlining departmental processes and make 
recommendations on office procedures. I oversee all computerization and assist the staff with 
training and/or guidance with their processes. 

Beginning July 1, 2002, Technology has been established as an individual department 
with a dedicated budget. Computerization and funds for technology will be centrally located, 
allowing for supervised spending and to create a uniformed network based on the same platform, 
I am excited about Swampscott's future with regards to Technology, I believe the Town is moving 
into a more efficient and user-friendly atmosphere. 

I would like to thank the Board of Selectmen for supporting me and for backing my ideas 
and decisions, and to all the department heads and staff for their willingness to change and for 
their welcome approach to new technology. It has been a great two years and I look forward to 
see what this year and the future will bring Swampscott, 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Denise M, DembkoskI 

Computer Analyst/Payroll Supervisor 



120 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Nelson Kessler, Cochairman 
Mark T Mahoney 
Thomas Ruskin 



Geralyn P M. Faico, Cochairman 
Joseph P Crimmins, Esquire 
Peter Vasiliou, P.E. 



Antigone Simmons, Esquire 

The Conservation Commission is a seven member appointed body. Its function is to oversee 
activities in the coastal zone and other wetlands in town, enforce the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection 
Act, and to uphold the Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act. 

In 2001 and fiscal year 2002, the Commission held twenty-nine (29) meetings, at which: two (2) 
Requests for Determination of Applicability were made, followed up by one (1) Determination of 
Applicability; eight (8) Abbreviated Notices of Intent and thirteen (13) Notices of Intent were made, 
followed up by the issuance of sixteen (16) Orders of Condition; one (1) Extension of an Order of 
Condition was issued; one (1) Enforcement Order was issued; and seven (7) Certificates of Compliance 
were granted. Several informational meetings also were held regarding environmental and conservation 
issues. 

The Commission would also like to thank the DPW, the Building Inspector, and all of the officials 
both public and private that have worked with us throughout the year. We would like to extend our special 
thanks to Gary Barden for serving as a full board member for four months while Peter Vasiliou took a 
short leave-of-absence to continue his education and to Carol Epstein for her four (4) plus years of 
service on the Commission. 

In addition, Antigone Simmons, Esq. was appointed by the Selectmen to the Commission. 



121 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



MISSION STATEMENT OF THE SWAMPSCOTT COUNCIL ON AGING 

• To serve all Seniors with dignity and positive regard 

• To identify and respond to the needs of elders and to advocate on their behalf 

• To promote an awareness in the community of issues regarding seniors. 



BOARD MEMBERS 



STAFF 



Mary Abramson, Chairperson 

Estelle Epstein, Special programs 

Mary Cobbett, Policy 

Bea Breitstein, GLSS Board Member 

Walter Newhall, Treasurer 

Susan Fisher, Secretary/Policy 

Felice Litman, Arts 

Marion Stone, Special Events 

Ina Resinikoff, Special Projects 



Executive Director, Martha Marcou 
Van Driver, Bob Gordon 
GLSS Site Mgr., Helen Richard 
Outreach Coordinator, Warren Hopkins 
Activities Coordinator Kathy Laurino 
Office Assistant Susan Pierce 



The Swampscott Council on Aging is a policy-making board. At the present time we have a full 
board with nine members serving on special committees. We welcome new member Felice Litman to the 
Board. 

HIGHLIGHTS OF 2001-2002 

The Volunteer Appreciation lunch with entertainment by the Melrose Singers was held at the 
Porthole Pub on April 10, 2002. Sheryl Gresek from Congressman Tierney's office attended the lunch 
and presented Certificates of Congressional Recognition to Director, Martha Marcou, Board Members, 
Bea Breitstein, Chickie Cobbett, and Felice Litman. Also honored were kitchen volunteers, Nancy 
Hughes, Connie Beauchain, and Kay Howes. Craig Lewin a student at Swampscott High School was the 
youngest person to receive an award for his weekly volunteer efforts. Chuck Marcou received an award 
for coordinating the golf, and bowling groups. Once again the Senior Center together with the North 
Shore Jewish Community Center in Marblehead hosted Soprano Ruth Harcovitz. Her program, a 
Celebration of Rodgers and Hammerstein was held at the Jewish Community Center. This program was 
sponsored jointly by the Swampscott and Marblehead Cultural Councils local agencies of the 
Massachusetts Cultural Council. The annual barbecue lunch was held on June 13'^ At the conclusion of 
the luncheon a brief ceremony was held in which various Board Members, volunteers and staff were 
presented awards by Representative Petersen. Receiving awards were the following people: Council on 
Aging Board Members Sue Fisher and Marion Stone for their time and expertise; in the field of elder care, 
Ruth Connell, Al Snyder, Goldie Colls, Jean Dow and Larry Katz for their hours of valuable assistance as 
volunteers in the daily lunch and bingo programs Director Martha Marrcou as Outstanding Director's 
Award and Outreach Worker Warren Hopkins for his achievement in helping develop the many new 
programs that have contributed to the success of the Senior Center. 

Folks enjoyed the Duck Tour, The Jacqueline Kennedy Exhibit, the Flower Show, Horizons Edge 
Cruise, La Salette Holiday Lights, lunch at Essex Agricultural School, and a trip to Foxwood. Lunch with 
the French Chef is always a popular event. Representative Doug Perersen attended and presented 
chairperson of the Board of Directors Mary Abramson and Board Member EstelleEepstein awards for 
their outstanding devotion and contributions to the Council on Aging. Chuck Marcou was appointed to the 
Board of Directors and the Finance Committee of Greater Lynn Senior Services. His extensive 
background as a CPA will assure that the interests of the Swampscott Senior Center will be well 
represented. COA Board member Bea Breitstein continues as a member of the G.L.S.S. Board. 

RENOVATIONS 

During the past year much needed renovations continued at the center. Over the summer the 
building took on a completely new and welcoming visage. A fresh coat of paint, new shutters and a blue 

122 



sign to identify the center has brought many favorable comments from town residents The first floor was 
painted and carpeted making the card room, waiting area and meeting room more attractive. 

TRANSPORTATION j 

Transportation is a very important part of the services offered to Swampscott seniors The j 

Council continues to offer transportation to and from the center for the lunch program Food shopping and ] 

banking take place on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday. Local tnps to Department j 

Stores take place on Friday Reservations are made by calling the Senior Center on the day that the ride i 

is needed Medical transportation can be arranged through GLSS, The Ride and pnvate vendors. ^ 

OUTREACH PROGRAM 5 

The Outreach Program offers the senior community the services of a full-time staff person who ^ 

meets and/or visits with individuals on a confidential basis in order to assess their needs Issues ^ 

regarding transportation, home health care. Meals On Wheels, nursing homes and adult day care are just x 

some of the many areas in which information and assistance are available. In addition, special initiatives ^ 
such as the Farmers' Market Coupon Program and the potential life saving, "File of Life" Program, were 
also conducted as part of our expanded outreach effort. 

INFORMATION AND REFERRAL 

One of the most essential services that we offer is that of Information and Referral. Many 
families's elders often find themselves in need of certain types of assistance that we may not be able to 
directly provide. It is in these cases that we must be able to refer them to the proper individuals or 
agencies who can best help solve their problems in a timely and efficient manner. This service requires 
strict attention on the part of our staff when it comes to listening to and understanding people's problems. 
In this way we can refer them to the proper agency and minimize the amount of forms and telephone calls 
for those involved Medical and legal concerns, along with those dealing with health care, housing, 
transportation, finance and insurance are some of the more common that are addressed. 

Additions to the Outreach Program this past year include: 

A Senior Men's Club that has grown to over 60 members. The men meet monthly for a luncheon 
at the Senior Center that usually includes a speaker who addresses a topic that is relevant to seniors. 

A Caregiver Group that is facilitated by Debby Segil of GLSS. The group meets twice a month at 
the Senior Center and functions as a support activity for those caring for elderly friends or family members 
who are ailing. 

An Elder Care Advisor , Barbara Devereux of GLSS visits the Senior Center once a month in 
order to make herself available for advisory purposes for those seniors who need assistance in various 
matters. Barbara also visits seniors in their homes by appointment. 

Our SHINE Counselor , Jim Kehoe continues to provide seniors with an invaluable service by 
advising them on matters relating to health and medical insurance. SHINE is a program offered through 
the Massachusetts Department of Elder Affairs. Jim, who is a local resident, is a trained volunteer who is 
available at the Senior Center for one hour each week. 

Other programs conducted during the year include: 

Flu Shot Clinic in collaboration with the Swampscott Board of Health. 

Stroke Prevention Clinic. 

Participation in the Wellness Fair at Salem State 

A Presentation by Outreach Worker, Warren Hopkins, to the Swampscott Rotary Club on 
the"File of Life" Program 

Distribution of Farmers Market Coupons to low income senior citizens. 

A grant funded taxi service for seniors who require non-emergency medical transportation on 

short notice. 



123 



The Outreach Program also arranged for a number of people to speak at the Senior Center 
including: 



ac;:; - Attorney Robert Bradley - wills, trusts and estate planning, 

a:. - Cheryl Greseck - (Congressman Tierney's Office) - Identity theft. 

3 - Dr. David Roberts - Cardiac Care, 

c;,: Joe Balsama - Hurricanes. 

I NUTRITION 

^ Meals are served five days a week from 1 1 :45 until 12:20. No reservations are required for lunch 

fc': Meals on Wheels for homebound seniors are available. Presently, Greater Lynn Senior Services deliver 

approximately 50 meals to Swampscott residents. 

|: PROGRAMS, CLASSES AND TRIPS 

1;'! Several classes and trips are offered to seniors. Information on classes and trips appear in our 

monthly newsletter. The Compass, the Swampscott Reporter, Lynn Item, Salem Evening News and by 
calling the center. Classes continue in Bridge, Wnting, Art and Osteoporosis Prevention Exercise. The 
Cribbage group continues as well as Mahjongg and Beano. 

HEALTH PROGRAMS 

Blood pressure readings take place on the first, second, third and last Tuesday of every month. 
Readings are conducted by Swampscott's Town Nurse, All Care VNA, and the Swampscott/Marblehead 
VNA 

NEWSLETTER 

The Compass is published monthly and contains the monthly menu, activities for the month, 
coming events and the latest information of interest to the seniors. 

FRIENDS OF THE COUNCIL ON AGING 

The Friends of the Swampscott Council on Aging was formed in February of 1995 and continues 
to lend assistance to the Center. We hope that people will contribute and join the Friends group. 

THANK YOU 

A very special thank you to all who helped make 2001 - 2002 a successful year. A very special 
thank you to all that volunteer at the Senior Center. Your efforts are greatly appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Martha L. Marcou 
Executive Director 



124 



TOWN COUNSEL 



In 2001 and the first six months of 2002 Town Counsel responded to a number of requests for 
opinions from Town officials on a wide variety of issues and represented the Town in several pending 
court actions. We advised the Board of Selectmen with respect to numerous zoning appeals, 
amendments to the town charter, ongoing claims brought pursuant to G.L. c. 21 E, election law issues, 
bypass appeals and various other general municipal matters. 

As always, we strive to provide fast and concise responses to requests for advisory opinions 
Town Counsel has represented the Town and its officers in judicial proceedings before the District Court, 
Superior Court, and Land Court and has represented the Town in administrative heahngs before the Civil 
Service Commission. We have also worked hard to provide effective representation of the Town in all of 
the Town's pending litigation. We continue to represent the Town in court on various litigation matters, 
and have successfully defended numerous zoning appeals. 

The office of Town Counsel has continued to work with the Town to reduce municipal legal costs, 
by researching many issues of municipal law and mailing Memoranda addressing those issues at no 
charge to the Town. For example, in the last eighteen months, we have advised the Town with regard to 
the Community Preservation Act, municipal websites, the re-employment rights of municipal employees 
called up for military service, comprehensive permits, setting fees for solid waste collection and disposal, 
municipal contracting and many other timely municipal topics. 

We have attended meetings of the Board of Selectmen and other Town Boards at the Town's 
request, and with permission of the Board of Selectmen, to provide advice on pending litigation and for the 
purposes of risk management. 

Town Counsel's objective continues to be to provide high quality legal services to the Town in a 
responsive and timely manner at a reasonable cost. 

We extend our appreciation to the Board of Selectmen for their confidence in retaining this firm, 
and we appreciate the assistance and cooperation we have received on all matters from the Board of 
Selectmen and other Town Boards and personnel. We look forward to working with members of the 
Swampscott town government in the future. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Leonard Kopelman, for the firm 
of Kopelman and Paige, P.C., 
Town Counsel 



125 



EARTH REMOVAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE (ERAC) 



In 1993, former owner of the quarry Bardon Trimount, clear-cut a three-acre parcel of 
trees just north of Overhill Road. Many neighbors felt increases in dust and noise. The 
Selectmen appointed a group and an Earth Removal by-law was voted in by town meeting in 
1994. 

One of the first tasks of the newly formed "ERAC" was to place remaining undisturbed 
trees and property into a no-cut, no-disturb GREENBELT area for the protection of the neighbors. 
In addition, Bardon Trimount was forced to replant and replicate the three-acre site that was cut 
down without permits. 

The ERAC feels that the negative effects of dust and noise the neighbors expenenced 
and felt when the three acre parcel was clear-cut, is more than enough evidence to insist that the 
GREENBELT Buffer remain in place. This past permit, the Board of Selectmen requested that 
language be inserted in the GREENBELT paragraph to potentially allow the school department to 
obtain use of now forest acreage to build fields associated with a new proposed high school; 
without placing Aggregate Industries in jeopardy of violating their permit which requires that the 
GREENBELT not be touched. The ERAC's opinion is that the GREENBELT Buffer should not be 
violated. 

The ERAC has continued to insist upon quarry modernization at the Aggregate Industry 
Operation on Danvers Road. 

Over the past year, the ERAC has monitored dust testing, testing of water at Fosters 
Dam, monitored noise studies and continued to build a date file in regards to the health and 
environmental issues surrounding the quarry operation. 

The ERAC monitors the daily operation of the quarry in regards to all activities in the 
quarry. The ERAC generally handles all complaints and inquiries at the Aggregate property. 

The ERAC has been working and pushing Al to update and modernize the plant and 
equipment at the quarry since inception of the by-law in 1994. Using a strong, but fair guiding 
hand over the past few years, we can report that the quarry operation has been perhaps 80% 
modernized with the Primary Crushing operation the last remaining piece of the puzzle. The 
ERAC has negotiated fairly, but firmly. Many meetings have been confrontational with neither 
side wanting to back down. This seems to be a common occurrence in other local communities 
that have quarries located in them. 

Recognizing the size of the operation and understanding the complexity of replacing and 
modernizing a plant of such physical spanning size, the ERAC has worked with Al in directing, 
and sometimes selecting what was going to be done and in what order. For instance; the old 
secondary crusher was located right in the driveway of the old entrance. Crushing, screening, 
and loading of trucks were taking place just 200 feet from the entrance of the facility. Despite 
witnessing some valiant efforts by Al, both physically and financially to rein in the dust problem at 
this major section of plant, Al was unable bhng dust containment down to an acceptable level. In 
order for the ERAC to recommend renewal of their permit Al had to relocate and upgrade this 
operation to an area of the quarry which was further back from the road, and into the upper part 
of the "hole." This plant has historically operated from the hours of 6:00 AM to 10;00 PM. The 
ERAC; in no uncertain terms has continuously informed Al that the plant and equipment should 
be sized properly to meet all their production needs within a 10-12 hour work day. The ERAC 
has clearly informed Al that after 2004, rock crushing past 5:00 or 6:00 PM in the evening was not 
realistic; and that the town and residents will not want to hear this equipment at that time of the 
evening and to be absolutely sure that their equipment and plant are sized to get the job done 
during typical construction hours. The ERAC continues to investigate some outstanding 
engineering questions in regards to the secondary plant but is very encouraged by the plants 
operation. The noise level produce by this plant is the measurement in which the ERAC shall 
measure against the new Primary Plant in 2004. 

** The ERAC has stated that should Al be able to conduct operations that would be 
oblivious to the neighbors and residents of Swampscott and Salem, that we would not mind a 24- 
hour operation. "If we can't hear you, we will not know you're there." 

Another key decision by the ERAC was the relocation of the front entrance, in an effort 
to cut down on dust blowing off trucks and to try and achieve a 50/50 split with truck traffic 



126 



traveling through Salem & Swampscott, the ERAC "suggested" that the entrance be relocated 
The ERAC believed that by moving the entrance further down the road, a majority of dust would 
blow off the trucks before reaching the populated areas of Swampscott and Salem. Although the 
traffic goal of 50/50 has not been realized, and dust blowing off trucks has been substantially 
reduced, dust still blowing off trucks remains a problem. When the push was made to relocate 
the entrance, the truck wash station that was to be installed during the summer of 2001 was 
delayed in part to properly place the equipment within the area of the new entrance; an entrance 
that involved a substantial effort to build. A truck wash station is not a mobile piece of equipment. 
It made no sense to install this equipment at the old entrance when a new exit was being 
constructed. The ERAC has been working of some type of truck wash since 1998, but has 
prioritized our improvement requests as we see fit. 

And finally the last piece of the puzzle: The primary crusher moves to the bottom 
by 2004. 

The ERAC has reached the end of a ten-year effort to modernize the operation of the 
quarry. The primary crusher moving to the bottom of the hole is the final piece of the puzzle. But 
first some background on the current primary crusher: The primary crusher is the machine that 
most of the town is hearing. It is a machine that has two gigantic adjustable "jaws." It is also the 
first piece of equipment that the blasted rock is introduced to. Ledge rock is blasted from the face 
of the quarry, and hauled via huge trucks to the "hopper" of the primary plant. The trucks dump 
directly into the hopper and the rock falls into the "jaw" of the crusher. The jaw is set to a 
dimension to reduce the large raw blasted boulders into smaller rocks that are then screened and 
conveyed onto the secondary crushing plant. The primary plant is only one crusher . The 
secondary plant has many smaller crushers and screens that reduce and process the finished 
rock product. An interesting observation of the "jaw" crusher is that is makes less noise and runs 
faster if the raw material being dumped in the hopper is not all large stones. Interesting because 
the blasting technique has a lot to do with the size of the raw material that is dumped into the 
hopper. A lesser and maybe weaker "blast" seems to produce much larger raw material. This 
larger raw material dumped into the hopper of the "jaw" make the "jaw" work that much harder, 
and is that much louder. Improved blasting techniques, as well as a new blasting contractor 
seem to have reduced the amount or larger rocks that go through the crusher as well as the 
blasting readings and complaints have diminished substantially over the past 6 years. 

The ERAC has worked to place the primary crusher in bottom of the hole for several 
reasons: 

1 . Noise. The hope is that noise will be reduced to the level of the secondary crushing 
plant. This is the standard that we have talked about for the past several years. In 1997, before 
the secondary plant was replaced, the ERAC, in conjunction with former superintendent Marty 
McKenney, and Bardon Trimount noise engineer Mike Nutting, conducted several tests at various 
locations. We stood at the corner of Nichols and Martin road, the top of Overhill Road, and at the 
intersection of Eastman and Minerva. 

With no measunng equipment set up, we conducted the following simple test: first we listened as 
the entire plant operated at full capacity. Marty then radioed the plant and had the secondary 
plant shut down. We noticed no change in the amount of noise. Next Marty radioed to run the 
secondary plant again, and this time shut down the primary plant, the "jaw." There was virtually 
no noise with the secondary plant running and the primary plant off. We performed this test 
at the other locations and heard the same results. This is to be the test for the new primary 
plant In order to maintain the existing historical hours of operation, Bardon Trimount would have 
to reach the noise level of that when the secondary crusher is running by itsel f. No measure of 
decibels; a simple test of the naked ear . It is Dan Dandreo's contention that the new plant will 
not be able to be achieved these noise levels even with the new primary crushing plant in place, 
which is why new capacity is so important. 

2. Capacity. The ERAC, concerned that noise reduction goals cannot be met, has 
continuously insisted that the new primary crusher is sized properly to ensure needed and 
contract production can be met within a 10-12 hour workday. ." This plant has historically 
operated from the hours of 7:00 AM to 9:00 PM. The ERAC; in no uncertain terms has 
continuously informed Al that the plant and equipment should be sized properly to meet all their 
production needs within a 10-12 hour work day. The ERAC has clearly informed Al that after 



127 



2004, rock crushing past 5:00 or 6:00 PM in the evening was not realistic; and that the town and 
residents will not want to hear this equipment at that time of the evening and to be absolutely sure 
that their equipment and plant are sized to get the job done during typical construction hours. 
3. Dust. The ERAC is optimistic that by placing the Primary Crusher deeper into the hole 
will reduce the dust from escaping the rim of the quarry because the dust will have to travel much 
further to leave the property. In addition, there appears to be several "foaming" products that are 
available that may be able to be adapted to the plant equipment to further reduce dust before it 
becomes airborne. 

Closing thought. Moving the primary crusher to the bottom of the hole by no means 
guarantees that all will be well at the end of 2004. By the end of 2004-2005, it appears that the 
quarry operation will be fully modernized. The Town of Swampscott, the City of Salem, and the 
quarry may be at a crossroad. Should the quarry, after ten years of intense modernization, not be 
able to reduce noise, dust and truck traffic to level's which allow it to co-exist with its neighbors, 
and not be able to reach and follow requirements out lined under the bylaws of the Town of 
Swampscott, the realization that a quarry of such magnitude just cannot fit in such a tight 
populated area may have to be made. Perhaps a new use of the land along the lines of the now 
closed Rowe quarry in Revere, or the Innis quarry in Danvers may indeed be the most 
appropnate use of the property. 



128 



BOARD OF ELECTION COMMISSIONERS 



Linda Thompson, Chairman 
Joseph Sinatra 
Barbara Devereux 
Edward Golden 

The Election Commission met on a regular basis for their monthly meetings, much 
discussion was centered on the re-precincting, which thru the Federal Census is done every 10 
years in conjunction with the federal census. The results of the Federal Census showed 
Swampscott with 14,412 residents. The Town Wide Census, which is done as an Annual Street 
Listing, showed a smaller number of 13, 665 in 2001. The State submitted 3 proposals for the 
Town to consider, a 6-precinct map with new boundaries, a 5-precinct map, and a 4-precinct 
map. The Commission displayed the three proposals at the Town Hall for the residents and 
welcomed any and all comments and suggestions. The commission met with the Selectmen thru 
the selection process and the decision as to which proposal to accept was made by the 
Selectmen in the sphng of 2001. The Commission was also kept busy with regular scheduled 
elections and 4 special elections. A special Town Election was held June 19, 2001, a special 
Town Election was held on March 26, 2002, a special State Pnmary was also held on March 26, 
2002, and a special State Election was held on April 23, 2002. At one point registered voters 
were asked to vote at 4 elections in a 5-week span. This could not have been accomplished 
without the help of the many poll-workers, custodians, and the Swampscott Police Department. 
The commission held many workshops for the poll-workers to assure smooth running elections. 

April 24, 2001 the Annual Town Meeting was held, the elected officials were as follows. 



Office 




Total votes 


Moderator: 


Martin C. Goldman 


1630 


Selectmen: 


Daniel Santanello 


1591 


Selectmen: 


Paul E. Levenson 


1402 


School Committee: 


Arthur Goldberg 


1335 


School Committee: 


Mary H. DeChillo 


1048 


Treasurer: 


Jack L. Paster 


1643 


Board of Assessors 


Neil G. Sheehan 


284 Write-in 


Board of Public Works: 


Robert C. Jaeger 


1428 


Library Trustee: 


Cynthia Zeman 


1415 


Planning Board: 


Veeder C. Nellis 


877 


Board of Health: 


Michael M. Bergman MD 


1130 


Housing Authority 


Albert DiLisio 


1538 


Housing Authority 


Patricia Krippendorf 


1048 


Constable: 


Stephen B. Simmons 


1149 


Constable: 


Carl D. Reardon 


1212 


Constable: 


Paul Minsky 


1209 



A total of 2,320 votes were cast, 24% of the registered voters. 

On May 29, 2001 , the members of the Board of Selectmen approved a map submitted by 
the Census Division of the Massachusetts Secretary of State's Office, which redrew 
Swampscott's precinct boundanes, keeping us at 6 precincts. The redrawn precincts are required 
by State law and are based on population as determined in the 2000 Federal Census. The new 
precinct boundaries became effective January 1, 2002. Because of the new precinct boundanes 
all 324 Town Meeting Seats became opened for the April 30, 2002 Annual Town Election. 

On June 19, 2001 there was a Special Election called for a 2-72 overnde. The question 
was as follows, "Shall the Town of Swampscott be allowed to assess an additional $2,469,790 in 
real estate and personal property taxes for the purposes of supplementing the fiscal year 2002 



129 



municipal budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2001?" The results were as follows, YES 
2076, NO 1888, 3,964 votes were cast, 41% of the registered voters. 

The Annual Street Listing for 2002 showed a resident count of 13,696. 

A first occurred for the Town of Swampscott on March 26, 2002, two separate elections 
were held. All went smoothly as the Town Voted on a Charter Change, and voted in a Special 
State Primary for the Senator in the First Essex District. This seat was opened due to the 
resignation of Edward J. "Chip" Clancy who is now the mayor in the City of Lynn. In the Senate 
primary the vote was as follows, for the Democratic Party Albert W. Bleau, Jr of Swampscott 
received 253 votes, Thomas M. McGee of Lynn received 2,320 votes, and Saivy Migliaccio of 
Lynn received 1,091 votes, there were no candidates for the other parties. 42% of registered 
voters cast ballots in this election. As a result Thomas M. McGee would be running unopposed 
for the Special State Election on April 23'^'^. The second election on that day was for a Charter 
Change for the Town. The vote was as follows, YES 2,476, NO 1,911, 45% of registered voters 
cast ballots in this election. 

On April 23' 2002 the Special State Election was held. The only name appearing on the 
ballot was Thomas M. McGee, who received 359 votes a 4% voter turnout. 

On April 30, 2002 the Annual Town Election was held. The elected officials are as 

follows: 



Office 




Total votes 


Moderator 


Martin C. Goldman 


1940 


Selectmen 


Reid J. Cassidy 


1352 


Selectmen 


Marc Paster 


1346 


Board of Assessors 


Vera C. Harrington 


1927 


School Committee 


Dan Yaeger 


1901 


School Committee 


Shelley A. Sackett 


1490 


Board of Health 


Martha B. Pitman MD 


1991 


Board of Health 


Lawrence S. Block MD 


2018 


Planning Board 


Jeffrey S. Blonder 


1808 


Library Trustee 


Carl Reardon 


1839 



A total of 3,235 votes were cast, 34% of the registered voters. 

*** The breakdown of votes by precinct is available in the Election Office. *** 

In June of 2002 Joseph C. Sinatra retired from the Election Commission. Joe has been on the 
commission since 1994 and will be surely missed. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Linda J. Thompson 
Chairman 



130 



ELECTRICAL & FIRE ALARM INSPECTOR 



In the period between January 1, 2001 and July 2002 there were 542 permits issued. 
Fees collected 42,502.50. 

Many inspections and re-inspections were done. There were 13 new homes and the 
remainder of permits issued was for repairs and renovations 

Our fire alarm system is being updated continually Fees collected from property owners 
with fire alarm boxes are used to do this work Within a few years the fire alarm system will be 
completely rewired 

Some fire alarm boxes have been removed All master fire alarm boxes on buildings 
remain, purpose being, if a fire occurs anytime, even if the building is unoccupied, the fire 
department will be notified immediately 

This department is now in charge of the town's traffic lights. New controls were installed 
in Vinnin Square, some are under the control of the state and some are not. 

The control at Puritan Road and Humphrey Street at the Fish House should be upgraded 
this year. The state is in the process of upgrading the traffic light at Burpee Road and Essex 
Street. This is necessary because of the children crossing the street at the intersection and the 
amount of truck traffic. 

Electrical Inspector and Fire Alarm Inspector - Daniel C. Cahill 
Assistants - Gordon Lyons & Ronald Marks 
Secretary - Helen M. Collins 



131 



SWAMPSCOTT EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY 



Bruce D. Gordon, Director 
Laurence Galante, Deputy Director Ronald Madigan, Deputy Director 

Emergency Management is the 21^' century version of Civil Defense. Since the end of World 
War II and in particular the last quarter of the 20'^ century the focus has been on natural disasters 
and nuclear accidents. The biggest crisis for Swampscott has been hurricanes, snov^/storms. 
coastal flooding and Y2K. After the events of September a new concern has emerged - how 
to protect the citizens of Swampscott and prepare the Town against terrorism. The first question 
is can we? The answer is absolutely! The next question is how? 

We must first realize that our lives have changed forever. We must view everything differently 
but we must also not let these acts stop us from living a normal life - going where you want to go; 
doing what you want to do. We must do it smarter. We need to become much more aware of who 
and what is going on around us. We must ask more questions and expect more delays and 
become more patient. We must prepare ourselves - individually, as a Town and as a nation - for 
the next attack. We must do everything in our power to live our lives as normally and freely as 
possible thereby removing the biggest weapon of terrorists - fear. 

On September 11 at the request of the Federal and State governments the Town went into a 
high security mode intended to protect the citizens and the local government. Each and every 
Town department and employee responded and reacted in a seamless and professional manner 
that can only be characterized as exceptional. At no time then nor since then has the Town been 
at risk. Local public safety and key department heads were meeting on a weekly basis to keep 
current on developments and insure continued operation with little to no disruption. This core 
group continues today to assess developments and prepare accordingly. 

Recently the State established S.A.T.U.R.N. - a statewide antiterrorism unified response 
network which is made up of the police department, fire department and emergency management 
agencies from cities and towns as well as state and federal officials dedicated to fighting terrorism 
and preparing for the next attack. Swampscott officials participate aggressively in this program 
and are receiving specialized training as well as being kept in the information loop in order to stay 
abreast of current conditions. We will continue to move forward with this program to better 
prepare our Town and departments. 

The Swampscott Emergency Management Agency prepared an assessment of the Towns 
emergency preparedness at the request of the Selectmen. Certain areas were addressed with 
them as well as the finance committee and the capital improvements. As a result of these 
discussions and as a result of Town meeting approving funding, a long-term program of 
improving Swampscott's ability to mitigate an incident and better protect and meet the needs of 
the Town has begun. We are working on ways to better alert the people to potential safety issues, 
give public safety departments better equipment and training, a more unified Town response to 
emergencies and the capability to triage and care for people for a period of time in an emergency 
independent of outside assistance. 

The Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan, the working document/plan of the Town is 
constantly reviewed and updated. Swampscott public safety officials have also increased 
capabilities and developed specialized responses for certain situations. While we can't anticipate 
the next crisis, natural or manmade, we intend to be as well prepared as possible to deal with 
whatever may come our way. Emergency preparedness must and will continue to be the major 
focus of local officials. Unfortunately this doesn't come cheap. The Town needs to insure that key 
departments are able to respond in an appropriate and safe manner. To assist in this we are 
pursuing grants, group purchasing and federal and state monies that are expected to become 
available. We will continue to work together as a team with the common goal to serve and protect 
our citizens. 

I would like to thank all the departments, members of the Town emergency preparedness 
committee and the volunteers for their commitment, dedication and cooperation. With these 
professionals and continued teamwork we will overcome anything that comes our way. 



132 



HARBOR ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



William F. Hennessey, Chairman 

Lawrence P. Bithell Peter C. McCarriston 

Geralyn P. M. Faico John J. O'Shea 

Michael Gambale 

The year 2001 was a relatively quiet one for the Harbor Advisory Committee. 

Fortunately, there were very few major issues affecting the Swampscott waterfront, which 
required intense scrutiny. As a result, the Harbor Advisory Committee met just once to discuss issues of 
interest. 

This year was marked by the resignation of long-time member, Lawrence Mangini. Larry served 
on the Harbor Advisory Committee with distinction for many years. He always contnbuted to the highest 
degree based upon his waterfront expertise and his love for the community Larry's input had been 
nothing short of superb and it was always presented with great enthusiasm and common sense. He shall 
be greatly missed. 

There is an up-side to this story. The Harbor Advisory Committee welcomed new member, 
Michael Gambale to service. Mike is a commercial fisherman operating out of Swampscott Harbor and he 
is currently the president of the Swampscott Fisherman's Alliance. In this capacity, he has for many years 
functioned as the Alliance's spokesman on matters involving the Department of Public Works and the 
Health Department relating to fishermen's concerns. He is also very active on the state level through the 
Massachusetts Lobstermen's Association. In the past, the Harbor Advisory Committee often consulted 
with Mike for the purpose of gaining insight and recommendations from his unique perspective. His 
membership on the Harbor Advisory Committee is certain to be of great benefit to the Town 

Temporary repairs by the Department of Public Works to the boat launch ramp along side the pier 
accomplished two years ago seem to be holding up well. Hopefully, these measures will suffice for a few 
more years as funds to accomplish permanent reconstruction are likely to be unavailable due to higher 
priorities associated with other town-wide infrastructure requirements. While the ramp repairs amounted 
to a Band-Aid approach to the problem, the ramp is now serviceable and may be so for a few more years. 
The Harbor Advisory Committee nevertheless recommends that a more permanent "fix" be applied here 
in the form of a completely new structure designed and constructed to suitable standards. The present 
structure is wrought with design deficiencies and it simply cannot be made suitable for long-term use. 

Of great concern to the Harbor Advisory Committee is the annual movement of sand at Blaney 
Beach by the Department of Public Works and by others. Each year, sand is moved in great volume from 
the front of seawalls to the low tide mark. The concern here is twofold. Moving the sand to the low tide 
mark has tended to fill in the harbor in areas previously dredged. This seems counterproductive to the 
very expensive dredging activity which took place in 1993. Furthermore, moving the sand from in front of 
the seawalls, especially in front of the Fish House parking lot, creates a substantial drop from the lot to 
the beach posing a potential hazard in terms of someone falling from the top of the wall to the beach. It is 
the opinion of the Harbor Advisory Committee that sand should be removed from in from of the seawalls 
to a point where the distance from the top of the walls to the beach may not be so great; however, we 
strongly feel that beach sand is a valuable commodity which should be utilized to ennch other beaches 
along the harbor such as that at Martin Way. Under no circumstances, should the sand be placed at the 
low tide mark to wash out filling the mooring area. These concerns have been expressed to the 
Department of Public Works and to the Conservation Commission. 

The Harbor Advisory Committee, as the name stipulates, is an advisory group to the Board of 
Selectmen and to the Town as a whole. Members are appointed by Selectmen for their expertise and for 
their special interest in matters effecting the Swampscott waterfront. As members, we appreciate the 
opportunity to be of service to the community. By the same token, we realize that committee members are 
not the only repositories for good ideas; thus, we solicit any and all citizen input on waterfront related 
matters. 

Respectively submitted, 

William F. Hennessey 
Chairman 



133 



HARBORMASTER'S DEPARTMENT 



Lawrence P. Bithell, Harbormaster 

Assistant Harbormasters 

Roger Bruley John Cawley 

Roger Carroll William Hennessey 

The year 2001 boating season was just so pleasant as to suggest that the weatherman might 
have been bribed. Nearly every weekend presented conditions that bordered on the ideal. As a result, it 
was a very busy summer on the Swampscott waterfront. 

The number of vessels moored in Swampscott waters grew slightly versus the prior year. In 
excess of two hundred vessels moored here in the year 2001 establishing yet another record number for t 
the harbor. Nevertheless, all who sought mooring space here were accommodated. Although additional ' 
space exists in the harbor for moonngs, the spaces remaining have diminished to the point where 
limitations may eventually have to be placed into effect. We've not quite reached that point; however, it 
may arrive soon. Shore-side, resources remain severely strained, primarily due to limited parking in the 
harbor vicinity. Remedies must be explored to accommodate the increased activity in the area if boating 
continues to increase in popularity. 

The pier, the floats, and the launch ramp served the boating public well this season. Launch 
service made available by the Swampscott Yacht Club made boat access more convenient allowing the i 
Harbormaster's Department to extend the mooring field further out into Nahant Bay thus allowing the 
Harbor to accommodate more boats. 

As in the past two years, in cooperation with the Recreation Commission, the Harbormaster's 
Department placed fifteen designated swim markers along town beaches. These markers have proven to 
be extremely beneficial in terms of deterring vessels, particularly jet-ski types, from encroaching upon 
beaches crowded with bathers. The markers also provide the department with basis for issuing citations 
to those who would violate designated swim areas in spite of these prominent signals to the contrary. 

The town boat completed its seventeenth year of service continuing to serve the community 
extremely well. A much-needed new "T-Top" was acquired and installed to protect staff from extremes of 
weather and from damaging rays of the sun. At eighteen years, the boat is however beginning to show 
signs of age; therefore, it is prudent to begin the planning process for a replacement vessel a few years 
down the road. We have done this working in concert with the Swampscott Capital Improvement 
Committee. It should always remain uppermost in mind that the harbormaster's boat is an emergency 
vehicle, which must be called upon to operate reliably at all times. ; 

This year, the Harbormaster's Department provided weekly assistance to the Health Agent by 
transporting him to all seven beaches in town for state and town mandated water purity testing. « 
In past years, the Health Agent would go to each beach by land, put on hip boots, and wade out 
into the surf with his test equipment. Approaching the seven test locations by boat saved the Health 
Agent approximately five hours per week and provided a more consistent testing process. This assistance 
to the Health Department was provided by Assistant Harbormasters on a volunteer basis at no cost to the 
town. 

Your Harbormaster and Assistant Harbormasters continue to be very active in the North Shore 
Harbormaster's Association. This organization is comprised of Harbormaster's Departments from 
Winthrop to Salisbury and all coastal communities in between. As in previous years, we participated in 
essential training programs designed to enhance our competence and readiness to better serve the 
boaters of Swampscott. Because of our active involvement in this organization, a Swampscott student is 
eligible to compete for a $500.00 college scholarship sponsored by the North Shore Harbormasters 
Association. Those having Internet access may wish to log on to the N.S.H.A.'s web site, 
www.harbormasters.org where the Swampscott Harbormaster's Department maintains a page. The web site 
contains much valuable information for boaters navigating throughout the north shore. Of interest too 
might be the Swampscott Yacht Club web site, www.syccompass.com for information attuned even more 
locally. 



134 



The mission of the Swampscott Harbormaster's Department remains a mission totally oriented to 
the community We strive to accomplish our mission in a user friendly, efficient, professional, and cost 
efficient manner while enforcing federal, state, and local regulations within our jurisdiction. Managing the 
mooring permit system and maintaining department equipment remain very important aspects of our 
responsibilities as well. 

To be successful in accomplishing the department's mission, cooperation of many individuals, 
organizations, boards, and committees is essential. We therefore extend our appreciation to Town 
Meeting, to the Finance Committee, to the Board of Selectmen, to the Department of Public Works, to the 
Police and Fire Departments, to the Swampscott Yacht Club for the use of their launch service and other 
considerations, and to the Town Clerk and staff for their considerable assistance, especially with the 
mooring permit system. Special appreciation is extended to the Assistant Harbormasters who devote so 
much time on a voluntary basis, for our mission could not be accomplished without these dedicated 
individuals. Special thanks are extended also to Mr. Harris Tibbetts who continues to provide extensive 
assistance in the placement and relocation of moorings within the harbor. Finally, to the boaters whom we 
serve, we appreciate your cooperation and good will, for it is you who ultimately make boating such a 
wholesome and pleasurable pastime here in Swampscott. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lawrence P. Bithell 
Harbormaster 



135 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Nelson Kessler, Chairman of the Board of Health 

Dr. Martha Pitman 

Ellen Vinard 

Dr. Michael Bergman 

Dr. Larry Block 

The Board of Health, during the year of 2001, has been extremely busy with all of the changes 
that have occurred since the September 1l'^ attack. The Board of Health, along with all other 
departments, has spent numerous hours on emergency preparedness planning for the event of a 
potential bioterroist attack. The emergency preparedness team's goal is to keep Swampscott safe and 
have all needed resources available in the event of any type of threat. The Health Director was asked by 
the Police and/or Fire Departments to investigate Anthrax scares on seven (7) separate occasions. 
Fortunately, there was no Anthrax bacterium found at any time. The Board of Health will continue to 
promote health and well being for the residents of Swampscott. 

In April 2001, Ellen Vinard's term as a Board member lapsed. She ran for re-election and was 
defeated by Dr. Michael Bergman. Dr. Bergman unfortunately had to resign on October 22, 2001 due to 
his relocation to Newton, MA. We want to thank both Ellen Vinard and Dr. Michael Bergman for their 
expertise and support as members of the Board of Health. Dr. Larry Block joined the Board of Health in 
January 2002. 

TRASH & RECYCLING 

Trash and recycling is the largest part of the Board of Health's day-to-day operation. The Health 
Department deals with multiple phone calls and complaints many of which need to be investigated before 
they can be resolved. Our recycling contracts are currently with JRM Hauling and Recycling for curbside 
and DeRosa Landfill Management for Schools and Municipal buildings. Recycling continues under the 
direction of the Recycling Committee, as well as the chairman of recycling. Nelson Kessler. This year 
showed a decrease in recycling tonnage collected by two hundred five point thirty-one tons (205.31). 
However, the first six months of 2002 shows this reversing to an increase in tonnage recycled. The 
Board urges all Swampscott residents to recycle more diligently as it is beneficial to the town, both 
ecologically and economically. In 2001, recycling efforts raised more than ten thousand dollars 
($10,000.00) in revenue for the town. The trash fee for the year 2001 was one hundred six dollars 
($106.00). The purpose of the trash fee is to fund the cost of waste collection. This will be the last year 
for a trash fee secondary to the proposition two and a half override in which the annual cost of trash 
removal and recycling was incorporated into the town' annual budget. As in previous years, the town's 
contract with Waste Management states there is a limit on the amount of trash disposed per household 
each week. This limit includes four (4) barrels of thirty-gallon (30) capacity or eight (8) bags also of thirty- 
gallon (30) capacity. Christmas trees and extra Christmas trash is included in this limit. Due to the 
contractually imposed rubbish limits, our trash tonnage decreased by approximately five hundred forty- 
five point sixty-four (545.64) tons. 

In the past year and a half the Board of Health sponsored six (6) white metal drop-offs and two 
(2) Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) / clothing drives which were sponsored in conjunction with the Salvation 
Army. We collected a total of three hundred and forty-eight (348) televisions. The 2001 hazardous waste 
drop-off was conducted with Safety Kleen for the residents of Swampscott. In 2002 hazardous waste 
drop-off was held in conjunction with the Marblehead Board of Health for both communities. The Health 
Department was given one hundred (100) digital thermometers from the Massachusetts Department of 
Environmental Protection for the purpose of conducting a thermometer exchange for our residents. This 
program was a success and we hope to have the ability to do more in the future. There were six (6) 
curbside leaf pickups. Also, the cemetery dump was open for residents to drop off yard waste. 
Unfortunately, the hours were limited to two days per week due to the need for an attendant during the 
drop-off period. In 2002, the Department of Public Works started charging residents twenty-five dollars 
($25.00) yearly for a permit to dump yard waste in the cemetery. 

PUBLIC HEARING 

In April 2002, the Coalition for the Health of Aggregate Industries Neighbors (CHAIN) 
organization presented a petition to the Board of Health requesting a public hearing to determine if the 
Aggregate Industnes quarry may be declared a noisome trade. The Board held this meeting on May 23^ 



136 



at the St. John's Sports Club on Burpee Road The Board of Health felt that this was a viable forum to 
hear all arguments and deliberations concerning this matter. At this time, the Board of Health is working 
with the Board of Selectmen, Earth Removal Advisory Committee and Aggregate Industries to get some 
of these problems rectified. As an example of this collaborative effort, there has been language placed in 
the permit renewal application that Aggregate Industnes will install a wheel wash system and move a 
stone crusher deeper into the earth. As yet, there has been no determination by the Board of Health as 
to whether or not they will label the quarry a "noisome trade". The Board would like to thank everyone 
who has worked so hard to bring this issue to our attention and collaboratively joined forces to see that 
the best possible outcome is reached. 

RESTAURANT INSPECTIONS 
The Director of the Health Department, James Marotta conducts bi-annual restaurant inspections 
in May and, then again, in December. This includes seventy (70) establishments in the Town of 
Swampscott. If a restaurant fails, Mr. Marotta would make follow up visits until that establishment was in 
compliance with the State Health and Sanitary codes. Yearly, after the May inspections, the Health 
Department sends out approximately three hundred (300) permits to these establishments. Each permit 
must be handwritten and some establishments can have as many as seven (7) permits issued 

BEACH TESTING 

Beach testing was changed from bi-weekly to weekly testing in 2001. We have seven (7) 
beaches that are required to be tested throughout the summer. Due to high fecal count, beaches were 
closed on three (3) different occasions last year. On June 19, 2001, Stacey, Phillips and Preston 
Beaches were closed. On June 20, 2001, retesting of the water allowed for reopening. On June 27, 
2001, Whales beach was closed due to a high fecal count and re-opened on June 28, 2001. On July 31, 
2001, Stacey, Fisherman's, Whales and Eisman's were closed due to high fecal counts. All were retested 
August 1 , 2001 and re-opened on August 2, 2001 . 

Beach testing began again on June 3, 2002. The Board of Health asked the Department of 
Public Works to post cautionary signs at all the outflow pipes on all the beaches which read: "Caution. 
Water flowing from this pipe may be unsafe for human contact. Do not play or swim near out flow." The 
Board is concerned that the outflow water contains bacteria that could be harmful when children or pets 
wade or play in the shallow pools that form. 

The Board of Health wants to extend its thanks to Harbormaster, Larry Bithell, and his staff for 
assisting the Board of Health with beach inspections. 

EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE 

In March, 2001, James Marotta, Director of Public Health was called by the Fire Department to 
respond to an oil spill. A commuter rail train had hit a foreign object, which ruptured the oil tank. When 
the train pulled into Swampscott station the oil was gushing from the bridge down onto Burrill Street and 
into the sewers. With the help of the Department of Environmental Protection, the spill was contained at 
Stacey beach before it could go out to sea. 

In April 2001, a car drove through the front of Fiorey's II Market causing great damage. Many 
food products needed to be discarded. The Director of Public Health worked closely with the owner of the 
store to assure that there were no other foods contaminated during renovations. 

In the fall of 2001, Swampscott lost one of its landmark buildings to fire when the Jeffers building 
on Humphrey Street burned. The Director of Public Health was called in to handle the neighbonng food 
establishments and restaurants. Water was shut off to this block of businesses making the restaurants 
unsuitable for commerce. James Marotta was available to answer any questions the proprietors may 
have had, as well as, to make sure these businesses were inspected before they could reopen days later. 

January 2002 saw a fire in the freezer of Johnnie' Foodmaster on Paradise Road. It was 
determined that all the food in the freezer needed to be discarded even if it did not seem to be affected by 
the damage. The Health Department oversaw the clean up process. 

CLINICS 
INFLUENZA 

The Board of Health conducted four (4) public flu clinics this past year. These clinics were held at 
Temple Beth El (2) Senior Center (1) and Town Hall (1). Our Public Health Nurse, June Blake. R.N 
along with several volunteer nurses were able to immunize approximately one thousand twenty (1020) 
individuals. The flu clinics were very successful due to the many volunteers that came forward to 
participate. We want to thank Rabbi Weinsberg and Martha Marcou for the use of their facilities. In 
addition we want to thank Salem State College instructor Charlene Campbell, and the 



137 



Marblehead/Swampscott VNA Cathy Mallard for all their help in making the 2001 flu clinic a huge 
success. We also want to thank June Blake, R.N. (Public Health Nurse) for preparing all flu clinics for the 
town of Swampscott. The public health nurse billed all senior health plans for the adnninistration costs 
and collected a total of two thousand one hundred sixty four dollars and fifty-nine cents ($2164.59). 

BLOOD PRESSURE 

As in previous years, the nurse performed twelve (12) blood pressure clinics at the Senior Center. 
Hepatitis B vaccines continue for eligible town employees. We provide tuberculin skin tests for all new 
hires for the school department. Approximately, thirty (30) school employees were done. The Board of 
Health has also been working on State mandated regulations for tattooing and body piercing and is 
awaiting approval from our legal counsel. Our Public Health Nurse also tracked all communicable 
diseases in the town, watching closely for any clusters or outbreaks. 

MENINGITIS 

In 2001, we started a brand new program for all our high school seniors. We offered meningitis 
shots for all seniors interested. We are hoping to make this an annual program so we can educate 
individuals on the disease of meningitis and, in fact, have held our second clinic in May 2002. In 
November 2001, the public health nurse had the opportunity to speak publicly at the Massachusetts 
Health Officer's convention in Hyannis in hopes of getting more communities motivated in vaccinating 
seniors against meningitis. 

IMMUNIZATIONS 
DISPENSEMENT 

Each month the public health nurse must travel to Tewksbury State Hospital for the 
Massachusetts Public Health Nurses meeting. At this time she also picks up any immunizations that will 
be needed by the doctors in the Town of Swampscott. The public health nurse logs in the lot numbers 
and expiration dates and dispenses the medications as needed. This includes all of the flu vaccine 
immunizations that the doctors are allotted by the State of Massachusetts. It is also the responsibility of 
the public health nurse to account for all the vaccinations that are returned by the doctors for any reason. 
These medications must then be returned to Tewksbury State Hospital. 

HEPATITIS B 

Each new town worker for the Department of Public Works, Police Department, Fire Department 
and School Department may choose to be immunized against Hepatitis B. This is recommended 
especially for first responders who would be more at risk. Several employees were immunized in the past 
eighteen months. 

TUBERCULOSIS 

Each new school employee must be tested for tuberculosis. The State of Massachusetts no 
longer supplies the serum; therefore, through the Public Health Nurse, the school department orders 
serum directly from the drug company. June Blake, RN, then plants the tests and reads the results three 
days later. This has been quite a convenience to the new employees who may not have the time to visit 
their primary care physicians. 

MELANOMA GRANT 

In 2001, the Health Department received their second annual (Ban the Burn) grant offered by the 
State of Massachusetts. The grant in the sum of one thousand three hundred fifty dollars ($1350.00) was 
presented to the Health Department at the State House in Boston. This year the Health Department 
worked in conjunction with the parks and recreation department providing individuals with sun safety facts 
when residents came in to purchase a beach sticker. We provided each resident with a sand pail with 
shovel full of sun safety education. With the monies left over we were able to purchase a canopy shader 
for Phillips Park for the Parks and Recreation Department. The Public Health Nurse also visited all the 
pre-schools in the town to teach sun safety and presented the children with the educational sand pails. In 
2002, the Health Department received their third annual (Ban the Burn) grant offered by the State of 
Massachusetts. This time the grant sum was four hundred dollars ($400.00) and earmarked specifically 
for the purchase of canopy shaders for other parks in Swampscott. Again, we employed the help of the 
Recreation Department to supply residents with sun safety education along with pinwheels or mini beach 
balls. We want to thank Anna Palumbo, Bill Busch and Connie Hayes for helping out in this joint effort. 

TOXIC USE REDUCTION NETWORK (TURN) GRANT 
For the past two years, the Health Department has applied for the Toxic Use Reduction Network 
(TURN) Grant. In June 2001, the subject of our grant request was Mercury Awareness Partnership. The 
Health Department planned to team with the School Department, Fire Department, Building Department, 



138 



Pesticide Awareness Committee and an Environmental Engineer to encourage the safe removal and 
disposal of mercury. We were not approved to participate in the TURN grant for 2001. We will apply 
again in 2002. Wish us luck! 

CAMP INSPECTIONS 

In June of each year, the Director and Public Health Nurse inspected five (5) summer camps for the 
purpose of meeting the regulations developed by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and 
local rules. This is another state required mandate that must be done for the safety of our children. This 
inspection included a thorough investigation of the campsite to insure that the environment was safe for 
the attending children. 

• Safe structures and equipment 

• Sanitary facilities 

• Adequate supervision of the campers at all times 

• Plans and protocols in place for medical emergencies, including medicine administration, 
natural and physical disasters 

• Sufficient health care coverage 

• Injury and fire prevention protocols 

• CORI and SORI checks for all employees 

• To ensure that there is a health supervisor on site over the age of eighteen (18) who knows first 
aid and CPR 

• Up to date immunization records for staff and campers 

A MESSAGE FROM THE BOARD OF HEALTH COLUMN 

The Board of Health Nurse continues to print columns on pertinent health issues and concerns. 
These articles included: 

• Glaucoma 

• Heart disease 

• Colorectal cancer 

• High blood pressure 

• Cholesterol 

• Melanoma 

• Influenza 

• Meningitis 

• West Nile Virus 

• Osteoporosis 

• Lyme disease 

• Food safety tips for prevention of food borne Illnesses 

• Organic lawn care 

REGULATIONS 

On April 23, 2002 the Board of Health passed regulations regarding Body Art. This includes any 
piercing or tattooing. The regulations are quite extensive and wntten with the utmost concern for public 
health and safety. The Board would like to thank June Blake, RN, for the many hours she spent 
researching this information and Mark Reich, Town Counsel, for his much appreciated legal advice. 

LECTURES 

In November, the public health nurse was invited to speak publicly at the Massachusetts Health 
Officer's convention in Hyannis in hopes of getting more communities motivated in vaccinating seniors 
against meningitis. June Blake, RN spoke on the program she helped implement in Swampscott to get 
Senior High School students immunized against meningitis before they go to college 

On February 25'^ and 26'^ 2002, Dr. Larry Block spoke with the Junior Health class at the High 
School. Dr. Block spoke to the students about nutrition and the important role it plays on heart health. 

On Monday, March 11, 2002, Dr. Martha Pitman spoke to forty-five (45) High School Juniors and 
Seniors on the topic of Human Papilloma Virus, a sexually transmitted disease that has been definitively 
linked to certain cancer. HPV is the most commonly sexually transmitted disease in the United States. 
The students were very receptive, interested and inquisitive. 

The Board of Health would like to thank Dr. Brian Coughlin, Superintendent of Schools for inviting 
the doctors to speak with the students. 



139 



MONTHLY HEALTH EDUCATION FOR MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEES 

Massachusetts Interlocal Insurance Association offers the town a budget for health education and 
this year we were allotted a budget of five thousand dollars ($5000.00). In conjunction with Martha 
Kelleher and June Blake, we developed monthly health programs for municipal employees. We 
performed the following so far this year; 
Cholesterol Screenings 
Tetanus boosters and pneumonia shots 
Glucose testing 

Fitness screenings and body fat analysis 
Sun damage assessment 
Bone density screening 
Ask a dietitian 
Glaucoma awareness 
Pedometer walking program 
Blood pressure screening 
Health assessment survey and prizes 
This program will continue into next year. We want to thank Claire Allemian, Wellness Director 
(MIIA) and Martha Kelleher, Vice Principal Swampscott High School, for their assistance in this program. 

WEST NILE VIRUS PROTOCOL 
The Board of Health was able to develop a West Nile protocol in conjunction with the Pesticide 
Awareness Committee and North East Mosquito Control and Wetlands Management District. We want 
to thank Walter Montgomery, Martha Dansdill and all residents who spoke at our Board meetings for the 
numerous hours on developing a protocol we could all agree on. This has helped everyone have a 
better understanding of the process. For 2002, the Board of Health is taking a more passive view of 
treating the mosquitoes due to their concerns of pesticides use. The North East Mosquito Control and 
Wetlands Management District will continue to monitor the mosquito population in Swampscott and will 
notify the Board of Health should they find any mosquitoes carrying the West Nile Virus, at which time, 
the Board will reassess the use of pesticides. 

ANIMAL TESTING 

Pehodically, the Board of Health receives telephone calls regarding dead animals. Generally, the 
Health Department will dispatch Philip Whitten to dispose of them. On occasions, when the species is a 
bird and seemingly dead less than twenty-four (24) hours, the Health Department will submit the bird to 
the Massachusetts State Laboratory for testing of West Nile Virus disease. In the past eighteen (18) 
months there have been no birds submitted for testing which have had positive results for West Nile 
Virus. The Board would like to thank Philip Whitten for his service and congratulate him on more than 
five thousand six hundred animal pick-ups over his career. 

ORGANIC PESTICIDE MANAGEMENT POLICY 

In the spring of 2002, Dr. Larry Block in conjunction with Martha Dansdill, of the Swampscott 
Pesticide Awareness Committee, collaborated on the Organic Pesticide Management Policy, A 
statement that declares that: "it is in the best interest of public health to eliminate the use of toxic 
pesticides on Town-owned land and in public buildings; to encourage the reduction and elimination of the 
toxic pesticides on private property; and to introduce and promote natural, organic cultural and 
management practices." This policy was presented to the Board of Selectmen on Tuesday, June 11, 
2002. The Selectmen support this idea and would like to help to make it a Town By-Law. The Board of 
Health would like to thank the Board of Selectmen for their time, interest and support in this matter. 

NORTH SHORE WELLNESS FAIR 

The North Shore Wellness Fair was a huge success. We were able to offer health screenings; 
educational materials, a 5k-road race, fun and entertainment go for all ages. We have already started 
planning next year's event. 

PUBLIC SAFETY DAY 

For the past two years, the Public Health Nurse participated in the annual Public Safety Day held 
at Blodgett field. This event helps residents to become more aware about health concerns such as sun 
safety, helmet use, car seats, fire safety, etc. Nurse Blake gave out sun-block, beach balls, pinwheels 
and safety awareness activity book, as well as informational materials. 



140 



SWAMPSCOTT'S 150'" BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION 

The Board of Health was honored to play a part in the month long celebration of Swampscott's 
150"^ Birthday. In addition to inspecting the vendors and making sure the food was properly cooked and 
served, we were thrilled to be asked to march in the sensational parade. 

OTHER POINTS OF INTEREST 
Dr. Larry Block was interviewed by Scot Cooper of WBZ radio regarding the organic lawn care 
article he wrote for the Swampscott Reporter. 

James Marotta, Director of Public Health, was interviewed by Terry Adier of the Channel 7 News 
on the topic of mandated beach testing and funding. 

An information display was set up outside of the Health Department. This display has a table and 
racks full of informative literature on many health subjects. This information is free to the public. 

VITAL STATISTICS 

The Town of Swampscott welcomed one hundred eighty-four (184) new residents including 
ninety-seven (97) females and eighty-seven (87) males. Congratulations to all! This year there were two 
hundred forty-two (242) deaths in Swampscott. The leading cause of death was cardiac conditions 
followed by respiratory conditions. 

In closing, we would like to thank all the dedicated staff and volunteers for making 2001 through 
June 2002 a very productive time for the Board of Health. 



141 



SWAMPSCOTT HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



This has been a year of great activity for the Commission. 

The Commission wrote and published an illustrated soft cover book to recount our town's 
development since its incorporation. We are most fortunate to have had Sue Ellen Woodcock, author and 
Salem Evening News reporter and Commission member Brian Best as our editors. Rick Pierro of 
Designer's Eye did the graphics. The book was published in the spring in time for the celebration of 
Swampscott's 150"^ anniversary and has received wide praise. Proceeds from the sale go towards the 
150'^ celebration. 

In 2000 the Mass Historical Commission awarded the Swampscott Historical Commission a 
$6,000 grant, which the town matched with $5,000 to survey the boundaries and historical integrity of the 
Frederick Law Olmsted Subdivision, a parcel of streets laid out and designed by him in 1889. Olmsted is 
noted for having designed New York's Central Park and Boston's "Emerald Necklace" of parks. 

The Olmsted district, a parcel of about 130 acres, consists of 382 properties, and includes the 
Town Hall, the Public Library, Post Office, three churches, and the Swampscott Historical Society's John 
Humphrey house. In the past year two public meetings have been held in town to explain the historical 
significance of this property to all townspeople and especially to those living in the area. The response 
from area residents has been enthusiastic and totally supportive. 

As a result of this grant, the Olmsted district was formally placed on the National Register of 
Historic Places in July 2002, a prestigious honor to the community. National Register Status is also a 
prerequisite to apply for additional grant monies for period street lighting, landscaping and signage, which 
is the Commission's next project. 

In 2001 the Commission applied for and won a $30,000 grant from the Massachusetts Historical 
Commission which was matched by $30,000 from the town's DPW, which is responsible for the Town 
Hall's care and upkeep, to pay for the writing of architectural specifications and blueprints to make the 
Town Hall fully handicapped accessible. This is a state requirement. The work on this project is 
underway. 

The Commission could never have achieved such a great year without the help of some 
wonderful people: Thank you to Town Moderator Martin Goldman and Selectwoman Carole Shutzer who 
went to bat for us to get seed money so that we could get our book printed before the advertising dollars 
were raised, and to Tom Reid and Jeffrey Goldstein for giving us a chance to put the word out on TV. To 
Betty Holmes, Sylvia Corrado and Anita Balliro for their book contributions and yes, Betty, for your 
retailing finesse! To Representative Doug Petersen, Patt George, Kevin Goggin, Denise Demkoski, the 
staff of the Swampscott Public Library and the Swampscott Historical Society for the time and expertise 
which they have so generously given to assist us in our work this year. 

Want to know more? Log onto our website, www. swa m pscotth isto ry . o rg . Our talented and 
dedicated webmaster Brian Best will update you on what's new in Swampscott history. And if you haven't 
already purchased your copy (ies), do go to Town Hall or the library and get "Swampscott, Massachusetts 
Celebrating 150 Years 1852-2002. It's a keeper! 

Respectfully submitted, Sylvia B. Belkin, Chair 

Sylvia B. Belkin, Chair 
Brian K. Best 
Mary M. Cassidy 
Angela Warren Ippolito 
Sheila Leahy, Treasurer 
Douglas B. Maitland, Secretary 
Jean F. Reardon 
David Callahan Sr., Member Emeritus 

Associate Members 
Louis Gallo, Historian 
Reverend Louise Mann 

Marilyn Margulius 
Sue Ellen Woodcock 



142 



SWAMPSCOTT HOUSING AUTHORITY 



James L. Hughes, Chairman 



Albert DiLisio 
Barbara Eldridge 



Marianne McGrath 
Patricia Krippendorf 



For The Swampscott Housing Authority the year 2001 was a continuation of the successful and 
productive year 2000. The year 2001 saw the completion of more improvements in the physical plant of 
the Housing Authority. As were the improvements chronicled in the Year 2000 Town Report, the 
improvements of 2001 were further testimony to the energy and dedication of former Chairman of the 
Board of Governors, the late Margaret Kelly who got the ball rolling for all of these improvements. 

This past year we saw the completion of modernization of the roof systems of the nine 
quadruplex buildings which compose the family housing community at Cherry Street and Cherry Court 
with the installation of rain gutters and downspouts; the asphalt shingles on the roofs of all nine buildings 
had been replaced under separate contract in the year 2000. Also, winding up in the year 2001 was the 
modernization project at the elderly/handicapped housing located at Duncan Terrace replacing all 
windows in the Duncan Terrace Buildings. The Duncan Terrace Community is made up of six (6) Garden 
Style Apartment Building housing forty (40) one bedroom housing units and the staff office of the Housing 
Authority. After over forty years of use, the original equipment sliding windows (Circa. 1961) had become 
very difficult to open and close, especially for the elderly residents, additionally, the window frames and 
tracks had become excessively worn causing drafts, noise and lack of security. In each of the forty units, 
in the office, and in the common ways all original equipment, sliding windows were replaced with vinyl 
clad double hung windows. 

On July 1, 2001, Mark N. Thomas stepped down as Executive Director after completing over 
fifteen years of service to the Housing Authohty. During Mark Thomas' tenure as Executive Director, the 
Swampscott Housing Authority made historic strides in improving the physical plant of the Authority. Mark 
Thomas oversaw the building of a residential facility at 12 Ryan Place dedicated to the housing for eight 
deaf, retarded citizens under Massachusetts Acts and Resolves Chapter 689. He also oversaw the 
application for state grants for, and the construction of, the modernization of public housing in 
Swampscott including the re-siding and re-roofing as well as the complete demolition and reconstruction 
of all kitchens and bath rooms and a complete upgrade of electrical services of the nine quadaplex 
buildings at the Margaret Kelly Family Housing Community. Mark Thomas was also oversaw the 
application process for the funding grants for modernization of the Duncan Terrace and Doherty Circle 
complexes He also oversaw the construction of new roadways, walkways and parking lots at Duncan 
Terrace and Doherty Circle, the new windows at Duncan Terrace, insulation in the Doherty Circle 
buildings, and new, efficient electric lights also at Doherty Circle. 

The Housing Authority is particularly proud of Mark Thomas' efforts to identify tenant fraud and to 
take aggressive action to eliminate it whenever discovered. Consistent with the philosophy of the Housing 
Authority Board of Governors, Mark Thomas was dedicated to providing low cost, high quality housing for 
the most needy and qualified citizens and exposing those who unfairly take advantage of the system. 
Mark Thomas took particular pride in the initiative during his tenure to name the Cherry Street/Cherry 
Court family complex for the late, beloved Chairman of the Authority Board, Margaret Kelly; the veterans' 
family housing complex is now called the Margaret M. Kelly Family Housing Community. 

The Swampscott Housing Authority and the Board of Governors thank Mark Thomas for his 
extraordinary efforts on behalf of the Authority, its staff and its tenants and wish him the best of luck in his 
retirement. 

On July 1, 2001, the Board of Governors appointed Donna McDonald as Executive Director to fill 
Mark Thomas' vacancy. Under Donna McDonald's guidance, the staff offices are well on the way to 
becoming computerized. Hardware has been purchased and installed and specialized soft-ware 
designed to meet the unique needs of small, state aided (no federal projects) is being developed by 
Swampscott resident Sam Stone of CyberSense Training & Consulting in collaboration with the 
Swampscott Housing Authority and several other authorities in like circumstances. Upon completion of 
the software development, much of the paperwork associated with the administration of over one hundred 
housing units will be obsolete allowing the Executive Director to focus more on quality of tenant life 
issues. 

Also currently underway with the oversight of Donna McDonald is another major modernization 



143 



project involving the elderly/handicapped community at Duncan Terrace. The new project, funded by a 
State grant, is the replacement of all the boilers in the six (6) buildings at Duncan Terrace. The project is 
now in the design phase. The engineering and design is being done by the engineering firm of Cronis, 
Listen, Nangle & White LLP from Danvers, MA. Upon completion of the design phase, bids will be sought 
» for actual construction. It is anticipated that the construction will not be completed until 2003. The 

1 installation of the new boilers will make a significant difference in the quality of life of the 
3 elderly/handicapped residing at Duncan Terrace by providing dependable heat dunng the winter. The 

2 present systems are the cause of great concern for the Authority; during the heating season, system 
^ failures which result in discomfort to the tenants and the consumption of an inordinate share of 
^' maintenance time, are all too frequent. All heating units to be replaced are original equipment installed in 

1961. Additional benefits of the new systems will be a marked increase in system efficiency, thus allowing 
<iM the Authority to provide more heat at a lower cost and an increase in the ease and safety of maintenance 

by relocation and modernization of various valves used in the system, 
^ii;: The Swampscott Housing Authority would like to thank Swampscott Police Lieutenant Paul 

^ Bartram for his assistance during his time as the first SPD liaison to the Housing Authority and wish him 

/»:( luck as he assumes greater responsibilities with the Police Department, The Authority also welcomes Lt. 

Bartram's successor. Patrolman Saverio (Savy) Caruso as the new police liaison officer. 

The Board of Governors, the Executive Director, and the staff of the Swampscott Housing 

Authority are committed to providing safe, comfortable and affordable housing for qualified tenants. 



144 



SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC LIBRARY 



The library is a successfully functioning facility with an abundance of valuable matenals. 
It is now open 59 hours per week, which includes four mornings for our senior citizens and 
mothers with young children and four evenings for our working patrons. We have also extended 
our hours to include three hours on Sundays during the winter months. 

We have increased our circulation by over 10,000 items this year including books, 
magazines, CD's, videos and books on tape. We have had over 85,000 people in attendance 
throughout this 18-month period. We have more than 10,000 registered borrowers at the library. 
Over 4,000 people have attended our programs. Volunteers have donated more than 2,000 
hours of work. 

The constant state of activity in the building gives evidence of our success. At almost 
any hour, every computer station is occupied, the tables in both the fiction and the browsing 
room are filled and the Children's Room is alive with activity. 

Townspeople have been coming to the library and availing themselves of all of our up-to- 
date technology. We now have more than 20 computers in the library for public use. Many of 
these are available for patrons to check their e-mail, do Internet searches, search magazine 
databases and produce word processing documents. The library's website is up and running 
and is proving to be of great interest to the public. Patrons can check on the availability of a 
book from home and even reserve it themselves. No one has to worry about overdue books 
anymore, since anyone with a home computer, which has an internet connection, can renew 
items from home. 

The library has offered a variety of adult programs throughout the year. We host several 
book discussion groups, a Swampscott history discussion group, guest speakers, computer 
training classes, and a program called "Practically Speaking" which allows our new Russian 
immigrants to practice their English speaking skills. This year we also tried a "Town-wide Read" 
Program. The premise was to have everyone in town read the same book, The Hate Crime by 
local author Phyllis Karas, and come together to discuss the book's themes of intolerance and 
hatred. Many people attended our discussion groups while others came to hear the author 
speak. This program was offered by the library as a part of our town's "No Place for Hate 
Campaign" . It proved to be very successful and will be repeated in the future. 

The Children's Room has continued with its high quality programming throughout the 
year. Beth Coughlin and Izzi Abrams, our Children's librarians, were honored this year by the 
Swampscott Chiropractic Associates for their dedication to the children of Swampscott. The 
children's librarians have also begun an outreach program to the preschools and kindergarten 
and first grade classes in town. They bring materials from the library to these schools and run 
library programs for the teachers, in an effort to develop the next generation of readers and 
library patrons. 

With the help of several townspeople, the library ran a highly successful Family Night. 
We had over 350 townspeople in attendance. Radio Disney came with a van and played music 
and distributed ice creams. Volunteers manned face-painting, nail art, button-making and game 
tables. We also sold pizza and soft drinks. Many of the local business donated food and 
supplies and items for a raffle table. Everyone who attended agreed that this was an event that 
should happen every year. 

The Assistant Director, Susan Conner, has spent a great deal of time this year 
developing instructional programs for those citizens who are computer illiterate. This year 
Susan is monitoring a grant from the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners for formal 
computer instruction for the senior citizens of the town. We are able to offer instruction in basic 
computer skills, word processing, and introductory navigational skills for the Internet. 

Our Teen Area has become a very popular place for young people after school. 
Computers are available as are reference materials for homework and a listening center for 
tapes and CDs. This area, which is under the supervision of Vicky Coffin, was highlighted in the 
national VOYA Magazine for the month of October. 

The Friends of the Swampscott Public Library continue to be very supportive of library 



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activities. They purchase rental books for those patrons who don't wish to be placed on a 
waiting list for a best seller. They have purchased numerous museum passes for our patrons' 
use (Children's Museum, Science Museum, Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, John F. 
Kennedy Library, The Peabody/Essex Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston-By-Foot, and 
the Stone and Franklin Park Zoos). The Friends also support summer children's programming, 
teen programming, pay for the printing and postage of our newsletter, and help to defray the 
costs of refreshments for our adult programs. The Friends of the Swampscott Library also 
purchase furnishings for the building. This year they purchased some furnishings and 
decorations for the Teen Area and a print of The Fish House by local artist Donald Menzies. 
The library could never offer as many services and programs without the help of the Friends. 

In conclusion, it is because of the dedication of the staff, and the Board of Trustees and 
the Friends of the Library that the Swampscott Public Library can offer so many services and 
materials to the town. It is because of the support of the townspeople that the library is a 
success. 

BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES 
Kelly Raskauskas, Chairman 
Cynthia Zeman, Vice Chair Carl Reardon, Secretary 



LIBRARY STAFF 



FULLTIME 
Alyce Deveau, Director 
Susan Conner, Assistant Director 
Vicky Coffin, Reference Librarian Maureen McCarthy, Head of Circulation 



Elizabeth Coughlin, Children's Librarian 
Marcia Harrison, Cataloguer 
Barbara Wermuth, Tech Aide 
Joanne Janakas, Library Aide 
Maralyn Keay, Library Aide 
Rebecca Ingalls, Library Aide 
Penny Longhurst, Library Aide 
Sami Lawler, Library Aide 



PART TIME 

Israella Abrams, Children's Librarian 
Ann Nechtem, Library Assistant 
Dorothy Forman, Secretary 
Jennifer Woods, Library Aide 
Yelena Kuzmina, Library Aide 
Phyllis Raimo, Library Aide 
Marie Epstein, Library Aide 
Jeannette Curuby, Reference 



OFFICERS OF THE FRIENDS OF THE SWAMPSCOTT LIBRARY 



Sandi Moltz, President 

Ellen Wittlinger, Vice President 

Shirley Ashman, Member At Large 



Sidney Epstein, Treasurer 

Barbara Wermuth, Clerk 

Pat Cardenas, Member at Large 



146 



VOLUNTEERS 



Ruth Rolin 
Frieda Canavan 
Winnie Patrikas 
Barbara Paik 

Respectfully submitted, 

Alyce Deveau, Director 



Terri Smith Pat Polisson 

Matt Cohen Rose Fishman 

Erica Katz Harriet Weinstein 



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MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 



Swampscott Representative 
Joseph J. Balsama 

The MBTA Advisory Board is made of representatives from 175 cities and towns that are serviced 
by the MBTA. The office is located at 177 Tremont Street, 4th Floor, Boston, Massachusetts 021 1 1- 
1020. Paul Regan is the Executive Director. The telephone number is (617) 426-6054. (Fax: (617) 451- 
2054. E-mail: advbrd@erols.com; web site: www.mbtaadvisoryboard.org.) 

As of February 27, 2002, Mayor David Cohen of Newton took over as Chairman of the Advisory 
Board replacing Mayor Peter Torigian of Peabody, who did not run for reelection as Mayor. The remainder 
of the slate of officers include: Vice Chairs - Eleanor Beth (Plymouth) and Barbara Marcks (Lincoln); and 
Clerk - Vineet Gupta (Boston). Mayor Cohen appointed Mayor Dorothy Kelly Gay (Somerville) to chair the 
Executive Committee and Jeffrey Nutting (Franklin) as Chair of the Finance Committee. Meetings of the 
full advisory Board were held on the following days in 2001 : January 9, March 26, May 23, July 2, 
September 19, and October 31. In 2002, meeting were held on February 27, AphI 5, and May 8. All 
meetings with the exception of the February 27, 2002 meeting were held on the second floor of the State 
Transportation Building at 10 Park Plaza in Boston. The February 27th meeting was held at the State 
House in Hearing Room A-2 due to a room not being available at the State Transportation Building. 

In November of 2001 , Bob Prince, the General Manager of the MBTA, retired. He was replaced in 
February 2002 by Michael Mulhern, who was appointed by Acting Governor Jane Swift. 

The MBTA services the Town of Swampscott directly through buses and commuter rail, and 
indirectly by the Blue Line, when commuters drive to Revere and park and board the Blue Line trains for 
Boston. The latest schedules, which change about twice a year, are available at Fiory's Variety Store, the 
Town Clerk's Office, The Swampscott Public Library, and several other places around town. You can buy 
commuter rail tickets at Fiory's. THE RIDE (the MBTA's paratransit service), which transports people with 
disabilities, is administered by the Greater Lynn Senior Services, Inc. (GLSS), 103 Summit Drive, Unit 2A, 
Peabody, MA 01960. The telephone is 888-319-7433 or 888-319-7433 TTY (for customers, who are 
hearing impaired and use a TTY to communicate). 

On September 7, 2001 , the MBTA began a one-year pilot program, "Night Owl Service." This 
extended weekend service on Friday and Saturday Nights until 2:30 A.M.. The cost to the MBTA is $2.8 
million in FY2000. The MBTA will evaluate this program to see if it will be extended another year. 

On October 3, 2001, the MBTA approved $650,000 in measures to heighten security in the 
subways and on buses as a result of 9/11. A community with an incident related to the MBTA is asked to 
call the Operations Center, which is opened 24 hours a day, at (617)222-5758. The MBTA Police can be 
reached at (617) 222-1212. 

The Aquarium station on the Blue Line reopened on October 29, 2001 after being closed for a 
year for rehabilitation. The MBTA Board of Directors approved the purchase of 94 new Blue Line cars, 
spending $172 million with all new cars in service by 2005. Twenty-five of the existing Blue Line cars will 
be retrofitted for service on the Orange Line to increase rider capacity. On Monday, June 24, 2002, the 
MBTA eliminated all direct bus service from Nahant to Swampscott (Vinnin Square). 



148 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is the regional planning agency 
representing 101 cities and towns in the metropolitan Boston area. Created by an act of the 
Legislature in 1963, it serves as a forum for state and local officials to address issues of regional 
importance. As one of 14 members of the Boston Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), 
MAPC has oversight responsibility for the region's federal funded transportation program 
Council membership consists of community representatives, gubernatorial appointees and city 
and state agencies who collaborate in the development of comprehensive plans and 
recommendation in areas of population and employment, transportation, economic development, 
housing, regional growth and the environment. The 25 members elected Executive Committee 
meets 1 1 times a year The full Council meets three times a year. The full Council meets three 
times a year. Meetings are held at various localities throughout the region. 

MAPC works with its 101 cities and towns through eight sub regional organizations. 
Each sub region has members appointed by the chief elected officials and planning boards of the 
member communities and is coordinated by an MAPC staff planner. The MAPC sub regions 
meet on a regular basis to discuss and work on issues of inter-local concern. Beverly, Danvers, 
Essex, Gloucester, Hamilton, Ipswich, Manchester, Middleton, Peabody, Rockport, Salem, 
Swampscott, Topsfield, and Wenham are members of the North Shore Task Force (NSTF) The 
municipal representatives of the North Shore Task Force sub region consist pnmarily of city and 
town planners. 

This year, the North Shore Task Force: 

• Reviewed and commented on the MBTA's Major Investment Study for the North Shore; 

• Discussed details of the new US EPA Stormwater Phase 1 1 Regulations. 

• Met with the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs regarding the implementation of 
Executive Order 418, a program that provides cities and towns up to $30,000 in planning 
services. 

• Participated in the development of the new Regions Transportation Plan, the main 
document that will determine transportation investments and funding until 2025, by 
reviewing the newly updated policy and projects lists. 

• Conducted a survey of all fifteen NSTF municipalities to identify priority planning and 
development issues for each community. 

• Discussed updating the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) and the Unified 
Planning Work Program (UPWP). 

• Researched the possibility of establishing an alternative transportation network through 
the state Transportation Demand Management Program and learned about how new van 
networks on the North Shore are meeting inter-suburban transportation needs for 
underserved communities. 

• Worked with town of Wenham to explore options to fund the restoration of its Town Hall 
and build a new police station. 

• Conducted presentations on the Community Preservation Act and/or Executive Order 
418 in Rockport, Essex, Hamilton, Wenham, Topsfield and Gloucester. 

In addition to working with its sub regional committees, MAPC has been involved in a variety 
of activities that affect communities within the region. 

2000 CENSUS 

Throughout this year, the federal government released Census 2000 data. MAPC has 
been busy analyzing the data to identify growth trends and disseminating information to 
legislators, municipalities, public and private agencies, and the general public. To this end, 
MAPC drafted two important documents. Decade of Change highlights key regional growth 
trends that occurred dunng the 1990's. Community Profiles, partnenng documents to Decade of 
Change, is a compilation of demographic, socioeconomic and land use data for the 101 cities and 
towns in the MAPC region. The profiles present a portrait of each community through the 
presentation of key growth indicators, which are documented over time to pinpoint specific trends. 



149 



BUILDOUT ANALYSES 

MAPC completed the two-year process of producing Build out Analyses for connmunities 
throughout the region. MAPC and Executive Office of Environmental Affairs (EOEA) staff 
introduced information about Community Preservation Act and build out analyses results during 
presentations to Mayors, City Councils, Boards of Selectmen, and interested citizens. EOEA 
funded the effort and contracted with MAPC to complete build out analyses for every city and 
town in the metropolitan region. The purpose of the study was to create an approximate "vision" 
of the potential future growth permitted b y a community's bylaws and encourage discussion of 
growth management options. Build out analysis results have been the basis for zoning changes 
in a number of communities, and have provided critical information for water resource planning at 
the local and regional level. These analyses will form the basis for planning work under 
Executive Order 418 and other comprehensive planning efforts. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN PROGRAM 

The Community Development Plan Program stems from the passage of Executive Order 
418, an initiative issued by former Governor Paul Celluci in January 2000. By making all cities 
and towns eligible for $30,000 in planning services to assist in the preparation of a Community 
Development Plan, the initiative is designed to provide guidance as communities consider options 
for future development. The plans should focus on developing affordable housing while 
balancing the need for economic development, transportation and infrastructure improvements, 
and cultural resource and open space preservation. The program is managed at the state level 
by an Inter-Agency Working Group (lAWG) consisting of the Department of Housing and 
Community Development, the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, the Executive Office of 
Transportation and Construction, and the Department of Economic Development. Within its 
planning area, MAPC is administering the program and working with communities to develop a 
Scope of Services. Communities may also choose MAPC to perform many of the planning 
services necessary to complete a Community Development Plan. 



150 



NORTH SHORE REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

January 1, 2001 - December 31, 2001 

Mary R Marrs, Swampscott Representative 
Amelia P. O'Maliey, Superintendent-Director 
North Shore Regional Vocational School District 



Merger Study 

The Merger Study Sub-committee membership consisted of: Mr. Wayne Marquis, Town Manager of 
Danvers, Co-Chair; Mayor William Scanlon, City of Beverly, Co-Chair; Mayor Peter Torigian, City of Peabody, 
Amelia P. O'Maliey, Supehntendent-Director, North Shore Regional Vocational School Disthct; Mr. Philip 
Holden, Boxford Representative of the North Shore Regional Vocational School Distnct School Committee; 
Or Wayne Burton, President, North Shore Community College; Mr. Gustave Olson, Supehntendent, Essex 
Agricultural & Technical Institute; Mr. Peter McCarthy, Essex Agncultural & Technical Institute Board of 
Trustees; Mr Ira Singer, Town Manager of Middleton, Mr. Robert Pariseau, community member; Mr. James 
Gaylord, Supenntendent, Peabody Public Schools; Mr. Jeff Wulson, Department of Education; Mr. Jeff 
Wheeler, Department of Education and Mr. Fran Kane, Department of Education. 

This Sub-committee met regularly throughout the year. In December, 2001 a final draft of the Merger 
Study Report was forwarded to the Department of Education to be reviewed before presentation to the 
Legislature The Merger Report calls for a school to be built on the Essex Agricultural & Technical Institute 
campus that will service both the current North Shore Distnct (including the city of Peabody) and the Essex 
Agricultural District. The legislation will address the composition of the district, the governance, financing of 
the new school and the operating costs of the new school. 

Administration 

The North Shore Regional Vocational School District Committee, comprised of one member 
appointed to represent each member community, is the governing body of the School Distnct. The 
Superintendent-Director and the administrative team carry out the policies of the District School Committee 
and oversee the daily operation of the school. 

In the past year the administration purchased and installed a new student administrative software 
system from Computer Resources, Inc. of Barnngton, New Hampshire. This software system enhances the 
Disthct's mandatory reporting to the Department of Education. 

New England Association of Schools & Colleges, Inc., High School Accreditation 

This past year North Shore Regional Vocational School District was granted initial accreditation. The 
accreditation was the result of two (2) years of preparation and work. The administration thanks the faculty 
and staff for their dedication to this process. We now join the ranks of all other vocational schools in the state 
of Massachusetts. 

Enrollment 

Student enrollment as of October 1 , 2001 was 435 Students continue to cite the size of the school, 
the interpersonal relationships with teachers, counselors, and administration, and the vocational programs as 
the reasons for application There continues to be a shortage of space for classrooms, shop areas, the library 
and the cafeteria. In addition, an auditorium is needed. In an attempt to alleviate our overcrowding, we have 
purchased a portable classroom, which houses the Health Technology program and added a mezzanine over 
the gymnasium. 

Students participate in programs in Automotive Technology, Carpentry, Commercial Art, Collision 
Repair, Cosmetology, Culinary Arts, Information Systems Technology, CISCO, Graphic Arts, Health 
Technology, Machine Technology, Marketing and Information Systems and Masonry. In addition, our Job 
Skills Training, a special education program, also encourages inclusion into many of the vocational areas. 

Curriculum 

We are offering MCAS preparation classes in both English and Math to 9'" and lO"" graders. The 
9'^ grade course is a full year course, with one day per week devoted to the VICA curriculum. The 1 0"^ 
grade course is a semester course. The curriculum is based upon the Mathematics and English 
Language Arts curriculum Frameworks, respectively. 

151 



Over the past three years, there has been a steady improvement in the MCAS scores. The 2000- 
01 scores are 33 points better in English and 31 points better in Math than the 1999-2000 scores This 
represents a dramatic improvement and places North Shore Tech in the upper third of vocational schools 
statewide. 

The 2001-2002 school year has seen an increase in the popularity of the Spanish language course. 
In order to address the increase in demand as well as to eliminate large class size, two additional classes will 
be implemented. Next year there will be two sections of Spanish I as well as two sections of Spanish II. An 
increasing number of students who come to North Shore Technical High School want the option of furthenng 
their education after high school. By offenng these language classes, North Shore Tech is ensunng that 
students are prepared for whatever future choice they decide to make. 

The mathematics curriculum continues to be upgraded At a minimum, every 9'^ grader will take 
Introductory Algebra (with Algebra I, Accelerated Algebra, and College Geometry also offered). Every 
10"^ grader will take, at least, Inductive Geometry (with Algebra I, College Geometry, and Algebra II also 
offered). These two courses will cover over 90% of the material on the MCAS test. The mathematics 
program extends, on the higher end, to Pre-Calculus in grades 11 and 12 and Calculus in grade 12. 
These courses carry pre-requisites in terms of performance in Geometry and Algebra II. 

Honors classes have been added at all grade levels. These classes carry weighted grades and 
higher expectations for students. MCAS Prep classes in mathematics are now a regular part of the class 
schedule for all 9'^ and 10"^ graders, and remediation classes have been added for 1l'^ graders who have 
not yet passed the test. 

The performance of North Shore Tech students on the mathematics portion of the MCAS test has 
improved dramatically. The failure rate has been cut from 72% to 41%, and the probability of at least half 
of these students passing the re-test in December is high. In addition, more students are capable of 
scoring at the Proficient or Advanced levels. 

MCAS Preparation 

Beginning this year, we are offering all of our 9*^ and 10'*^ graders an MCAS preparatory class in 
both English and Mathematics. The 9*^ graders will have a full credit of MCAS prep while the 10'^ graders 
will receive one-half credit. Title I now includes a mathematics component to further assist students with 
MCAS preparation. 

General and Program Advisory Committees 

The main topics and focus of the Program Advisory Committees were, the purchase of new 
equipment in the vocational areas, assisting with NATEF certification for Collision Repair addressing the 
technology needs in the various vocational areas, VICA, and other competitions. 

The next meeting of the Program and General Advisory is October 18, 2001. 

Vocational - Service Cluster 
Graphic Arts 

With the addition of the second instructor, Mr. Murphy, students will have extensive exposure to 
Desktop Publishing and HTML (web design). The graphic arts shop received additional new computers 
and updated software including the latest versions of Quark Xpress, a page layout software; Adobe 
Photoshop, a photo manipulation software; and Adobe Illustrator, a drawing and painting program. 
Graphics students work on various projects including designing a web page, posters, brochures, business 
cards and memo pad. 

Health Technology 

The Health Technology curriculum has expanded this year to include an entry-level childcare 
program and nurses aid training program. The shop now has a fully equipped regular hospital room and fully 
equipped newborn nursery areas. With the additional equipment competent students in health tech have the 
opportunity to develop a better understanding of the many varied career paths in the health field. 



152 



Vocational -- Technical Cluster 
Carpentry/Masonry 

The carpenters have completed work on a 24'x48' garage in Beverly and are currently doing 
finish work on a garage/stable that North ShoreTech carpenters constructed last year 

The masons are completing work on a brick veneer project for the Gloucester Housing Authority. 

Automotive/Collision Repair 

The Automotive Technology shop is in the process of reorganization. The related classroom has 
been expanded and the computer lab has been moved to the front of the shop. This will allow students to 
safely access the computer room without passing through the shop. In order to accomplish this the 
Hunter alignment machine was relocated and the teacher stations have been moved to the rear area of 
the shop. 

Collision repair students are working on a variety of tasks and projects from basic hand and 
power tools to body/frame alignment and refinishing. The ninth grade exploratory students are working 
on basic trade tasks. This year collision repair students completed their first community service project — 
a dump truck owned by the Middleton Department of Public Works. This project consisted of welding 
panels and repairing and refinishing the body. A Middleton police department vehicle will soon arrive for 
repair services. 

Machine Technology 

This year machine technology has made many changes. We sadly said good-bye to Mr. Surrette 
but welcomed our new instructor, Mr. Rodenck. Also, we had the good fortune of getting four (4) new 
machines donated: one Hardings lathe and two surface grinders from Ken Evans of Evans Industries. 
The fourth machine we received was a welder from Middlesex Gas. In addition, Mr. Rollins, one of the 
shop teachers, was able, through the budget process, to obtain a brand new lathe and two horizontal 
saws. 

CISCO 

The Cisco Lab is up and running, with a mini-network set up to facilitate network training. There 
are plans to permanently install an overhead projector and a touch-screen smart board in the lab, which 
will greatly enhance our ability to provide quality presentations to support the hands-on curriculum. 

Technology 

North Shore Regional Vocational School District continues to make improvements in the area of 
Technology. The plan was to complete the connections to all areas with the goal to have ninety five to 
one hundred percent (95-100%) of our classrooms and computer labs connected to the LAN with Internet 
access by end of the last school year. All the classrooms, computer labs and administrative areas 
networked. 

There are four (4) computer labs with fifteen (15) to twenty (20) workstations. During the year we 
purchased twelve (12) new computers for the Library. In the Library there is a total of fourteen (14) 
computer workstations available for Internet research and computer applications. 

Last year an eighty thousand-dollar ($80K) Perkins "New Technology" grant was received to fund 
a "State of the Art" Networking Lab. A dedicated laboratory was set-up in February with twenty (20) new 
computer workstations networked for a web based curriculum with Cisco and five (5) new computer 
workstations and support devices were set up for a dedicated mini network for training purposes. North 
Shore Technical High School is a "Local Cisco Networking Academy" partnering with North Shore 
Community College and the Cisco Corporation; two (2) of our staff members are certified instructors for 
the program and are in the second year of the program. 

Approximately, one hundred and seventy-five (175) personal computers are in use in the District, 
with twenty-six (26) used administratively. Instructors use one hundred and forty-nine (149) computers in 
computer labs or individually. The Student to Computer Ratio has reported to the Department of 
Education is 3.31 to 1 well within the 5.0 to 1 requirement. 

The schools web page (http://viAAAA/.mec.edu/nsths)is updated daily. Staff training was provided 
on "Front Page" resulting in an increase in teachers creating links through a home page to communicate 
assignments and streamline research. 



153 



Professional Development 

Academic and Special Education teachers continued to meet to improve the curhculum 
alignment. Janice Magno presented a program descnbing inclusion strategies that were useful in the 
classroom. Academic teachers completed a detailed analysis of MCAS results and developed various 
lesson strategies to meet student needs. Special Education teachers attended classes related to new 
Individual Education Plans. 

To improve the Writing Across the Curriculum program, Ira Steinberg, who represented the John 
Collins Writing Network presented a workshop related to vocational wnting projects. Based upon the 
need for students to improve their writing in all areas, the Technical Writing program was developed by 
English, reading and vocational teachers and administrators. Integrated workshops were held to develop 
strategies and grading procedures. 

Joining High Schools That Work has given us the opportunity to become part of an important vocational 
initiative. During July several faculty members attended the national conference. Based on what was 
learned, focus committees were formed, information shared, goals discussed and an action plan 
developed. 

Special Education Department 

There are approximately one hundred and eighty-four (184) students at North Shore Technical 
High School who have been identified as having special needs; they represent 42% of the general 
student population. Programs and services are provided and administered by a staff comprised of a 
coordinator, an assistant coordinator, twelve special education teachers, a speech/language pathologist, 
a Wilson certified reading teacher, a psychometrist, three instructional aides, and one secretary. 

Teachers certified in Wilson Reading provide individual tutorials in the Wilson methods to those 
students with significant reading deficits, in compliance with their Individual Education Plan. Our Speech 
and Language Pathologist provides both individual and small group instruction in the area of 
communication, including receptive and expressive language skills (both oral and written), reading, 
vocabulary, phonological processing, usage, social language and articulation. 

Through our special education professional development grant we have two new initiatives this 
year. The first is the Irlen reading program. We have trained two teachers to become certified in 
screening for the Irlen Syndrome, a perceptual dysfunction affecting reading. Students with this 
syndrome have to put more time and energy into the reading process. The treatment, developed by 
Helen Irlen, consists of the use of colored overlays. This year, we will screen all of our ninth and tenth 
graders for this disability, and treat those who exhibit the symptoms. 

The second grant-funded initiative in the special education department has involved program 
improvement. With regard to the Individual Education Plan form and process, a group of six (6) special 
education teachers worked over the summer to develop measurable and attainable goals, objectives and 
benchmarks for students in vanous curriculum and vocational areas. A second group of eight (8) 
teachers (four special education and four general education) is working in teams throughout this year to 
improve their collaborative teaching model of inclusion. A consultant. Dr. George Flynn from Salem State 
College, meets with these teachers regularly to discuss methods and models of collaboration. He also 
observes and critiques the teams in their classroom settings. 

Athletic Department 

The girls basketball team continued to show improvement and with many players returning the 
team should be very competitive this year. 

The baseball team won the league championship for the first time in school history and advanced 
into the State Tournament. Over thirty (30) students participated in the baseball program, which allowed 
us to field both a varsity and junior varsity team. The team made a trip to Cooperstown, New York, 
played on Doubleday Field, and visited the Baseball Hall of Fame. 

This fall has been an exciting season for the athletic department. The new Co-op arrangement with 
Essex Aggie has brought five (5) freshmen boys to play football and two (2) junior girls to participate on 
the volleyball team. Two (2) freshman students from North ShoreTech are running on the Essex Aggie 
cross-country team. Danielle Sargent (North Shore Tech) finished second in the Girls State Vocational 
Meet and 20 " in the Girls Freshman State Meet, 



154 



A mezzanine was added to the gymnasium for storage. This has made equipment storage and 
inventory much easier. It has also allowed for the creation of a Health Classroom in the former aerobics 
,1 room. 

Our participation rates are at the high end for vocational schools and our teams are becoming 
I more competitive all the time. The current freshmen class is very active in athletics, which lends a lot of 
promise for the future. 

I Career Exploration 

The career exploratory program continues to support ninth grade students in preparation for their 
career choice and shop selection The ninth grade students currently explore all twelve (12) 
vocational/technical areas on a rotating basis. North Shore Tech's schedule has two (2) cycles. Each 
cycle lasts five (5) days and fluctuates between "A" and "B" weeks, with the latter being the shop week for 
both ninth and twelfth grades. The exploratory has been modified so those students spend four (4) 
penods in their exploratory during "B" week and the other four (4) in academic classes and physical 
education. This allows for smaller exploratory cohort groups. The students will have completed their 
exploratory in the early spring, and will then re-explore four (4) shops, before choosing a final shop 
i| choice. 

School-to-WorkyPlacement 

In the 2000-2001 school year almost seventy (70) students participated In the Cooperative 
Education Program. Each of these students worked during school time in their vocational area gaining 
experience and school credits in the world of work. It is anticipated that at least the same number of 
students will be involved during the 2001-2002 school year in the Cooperative Education Program. North 
Shore Tech is using the Massachusetts Work-Based Learning Plan to evaluate the students' progress in 
the following areas: communication, problem solving and completion of tasks, professionalism and 
interaction with fellow workers. The goal of the Work-Based Learning Plan is to provide a solid structure 
for students and their employers to work together and maximize the learning experience. 

On Friday, June 1, 2001 North Shore Tech graduated eighty-nine (89) seniors. Sixty two percent 
(62%) of the class was placed in jobs in their technical/vocational co-related areas. Thirty-five percent 
(35%) matnculated at post secondary institutions and three percent (3%) began a full-time military 
commitment. North Shore Tech continues to offer a permanent placement service including career 
guidance to all graduates. 

I Tech Prep 

North Shore Technical High School participates in the Tech Prep Program in six (6) 
vocational/technical areas: Marketing, Machine Technology, Health Technology, Culinary Arts, 
Automotive Technology, and Information Systems Technology. 

An articulation agreement has been set up between North Shore Community College and North 
Shore Tech to offer our students an opportunity to earn college credits by successfully completing certain 
academic and vocational courses offered during their senior year in high school. The community college 
professors based on a review of program content and level of difficulty have approved the specific 
tj courses The articulation agreements must be renewed every other year to satisfy the college 
requirements. 

Representatives from North Shore Community College have visited our school to promote 
ij student participation and make them aware of this unique opportunity. Last June two (2) graduates from 
North Shore Tech received $600.00 in Tech Prep Scholarships in addition to earning the college credits. 

Health Office - School Nurse 

The school nurse continued her involvement in the Enhanced School Health Grant through the 
School Health Division of the Department of Public Health. The grant helped fund $1,000 toward the 
health component of the new administrative computer system MMS. The nurse attended training and 
began using the MMS system in June to computerize student immunization records and daily log of 
I student's visits. This grant provides networking with other school nurses in vocational schools throughout 
the State. The grant provided education offerings specific to health care needs of vocational students. 



155 



Building and Grounds 

A second portable wall was added to the cafeteria area, which allows more flexibility in scheduling. In 
the Culinary Arts area a new rotary oven was installed replacing a 1940's era oven. In the Auto Tech Shop 
storage racks were installed which opened up more floor space for additional student workstations. 

A mezzanine was added to the gym for use as a storage space for athletic equipment and this opens 
up more space for the instruction area. On the perimeter of the building secunty cameras were installed. 

Transportation Department 

The Transportation Department provided transportation to and from school on a daily basis for 
approximately 420 students. The number of late buses and sports late buses remained at four (4). The 
number of students involved in sports, MCAS Prep and other after school activities continues to increase, 
therefore, the number of students using the late buses and sports buses has increased again this year. We 
are to the point of using full size buses for some of the runs. 

Adult Education 

Adult Evening Education at North Shore is a self-supporting program that offers more than fifty-four 
(54) vocational-technical classes that enhance the professional and personal lives of the adult members of 
our community. The Program serves more than one thousand adult students participating in a wide variety of 
courses. Popular fields of study include, computers, health, construction, welding, culinary, automotive and 
business skills. A number of courses have state approval for professional and trade license preparation. 

Grants 

Thus far during the 2001-02 school year. North Shore Technical High School has been awarded 
several important grants: $12,000 classroom size reduction grant, $5000 Career Resources Grant, 
$20,000 High Schools That Work Continuation Grant, $50,000 professional development grant, $20,000 
Non-traditional occupations grant, $4400 School Breakfast grant, $3000 Gifted and Talented Grant. 
$1,200 Tomorrows Teachers Club Grant, $28,000 Technology Lighthouse Grant, $20,000 Students as 
Technology Leaders Grant, $21,000 Project Success Grant, and an additional $10,000 from Toshiba, 
Green Schools, and the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs for water quality testing. 

High Schools That Work 

This past summer nine (9) staff members attended the High Schools That Work (hereinafter 
HSTW) Professional Development Summer Conference in Atlanta, GA. They returned with a renewed 
desire to continue making improvements at North Shore Technical High School. 

In September 2001 , the HSTW Team at North Shore Technical High School set two (2) goals for 
the 2001-02 school year. The first to improve student attendance to 95% and, the second to raise MCAS 
scores to the level of the state average. At a meeting held on November 1^', with a representative from 
the Department of Education, it was stated that changes at North Shore Technical High School which 
have been brought about by High Schools That Work are already evident. The committee has committed 
itself to continue striving for improvement. 



156 



North Shore Regional Vocational School District Committee 



Beverly 


Paul F. McDonald 


Boxford 


rniiip J. Moiaen 


Danvers 


T. Frank Tyrrell, Jr., Parliamentarian 


Essex 


George R. Harvey, Secretary 


Gloucester 


Paula Evans 


1 t : 1 A. — 

Hamilton 


David W. Ketcham 


Lynnfield 


Paul Anderson 


Manchester-by-the-Sea 


Joseph Sabella 


Marblehead 


Mary Kay Roper 


Middleton 


Roger Drysdale, Vice Chairman 


Nahant 


Thomas F. Johnson 


Rockport 


G. Stanley Patey, III 


Salem 


William D. Wilkins 


Swampscott 


Mary Marrs, Chairman 


Topsfield 


Richard Darrah 


Wenham 


William 0. Nichols 



157 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



Gene Nigrelli, Chair 
Peter C. McCarriston 
David S. Van Dam 
Michael Tumulty 

The Personnel Board held several meetings and public hearings on proposed amendments to the 
Personnel Board Bylaws and Salary Plan. The Personnel Board reviewed benefit and salary scales of 
those positions covered by the Personnel Board Bylaws and Salary Plan and met with various 
Department Heads to discuss any proposed amendments prior to making recommendations to an Annual 
or Special Town Meeting. 

We have made some strides toward our goal of formalizing a process requiring annual 
performance appraisals of employees under the Personnel Board's jurisdiction. For two consecutive 
years we have received from supervisors and reviewed employee appraisals prior to Town Meeting. 
Although there is still work to be done in this area, we continue to move toward perfecting a professional 
evaluation process. 

For the first time, we have developed or updated and currently maintain a set of job descriptions 
for positions under the Personnel Board's jurisdiction, union positions (except schools) and positions 
eligible in accordance with Massachusetts General Law (Town Accountant, Police and Fire Chiefs) to 
have an employment agreement (contract) with the Town. 

We would like to express our appreciation to former Personnel Board member Gary Langdon 
(resigned in 2001) for his dedicated service to the Town and to the Department Heads for their continued 
cooperation and support. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Gene Nigrelli, Chair 



158 



PLANNING BOARD 



The Planning Board held seventeen (17) meetings during the year January 1 - 
December 31, 2001 and eight (8) meetings during the six months from January 1 - June 30, 2002 
to review and provide approval action on various plans submitted to it under the Massachusetts 
Subdivision Control Law, and on site plans submitted to it in accordance with Swampscott Town 
By-Laws Discussions were held with Swampscott residents, developers, contractors, architects 
and engineers regarding these matters to provide guidance and to assure compliance with Town 
By-Laws and regulations Approval action was taken on sixty-four (64) plans and site plan review 
applications after board members had made site inspections and discussed statutory and 
community considerations with the applicants and their representatives and received opinions 
from abutting neighbors and other town residents This number of plans and site plan reviews is 
a significant increase from the fifteen (15) per year average, which occurred, in recent years. 
While most of the site plans pertained to additions to residential dwellings, approval action also 
included the building of a new clubhouse and swimming pool at the Swampscott Beach Club and 
rebuilding of the three story business building on Humphrey Street which was destroyed by fire. 

The board monitored existing and recently approved projects for compliance with 
stipulated conditions and Planning Board Rules and Regulations. 

Three (3) public hearings were held by the Planning Board regarding proposed 
amendments to the Swampscott Zoning By-Law prior to Planning Board submittal of 
recommendations to Town Meeting for action. Based on comments and opinions from town 
residents presented at the public hearings, the board recommended that these proposed 
amendments be referred back to the Planning Board for further study, and subsequent action at 
future town meeting. 

Planning Board representatives attended meetings of the Zoning Board of Appeals to 
provide information regarding the status of Planning Board actions, which interrelated with ZBA 
matters. 

The following officers were reelected in 2001 and 2002 to serve the board: Eugene 
Barden as Chairman, John Phelan as Vice Chairman and Veeder Nellis as Clerk. 

The Planning Board wishes to express its appreciation to other town boards and officials 
for their cooperation in helping to promote the town's interests and welfare. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Eugene Baiden, Chair 
Jeffrey Blonder 
Richard Mcintosh 
Veeder Nellis 
John Phelan 



159 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Mission Statement 

The Swampscott Police Department is a community-oriented police department, 
committed to excellence in response to the needs of all our citizens. This commitment extends to 
all who are challenged by physical, emotional, or health considerations, all that have chosen an 
alternative lifestyle, all religions, ages, races, colors, creeds, and nationalities. Dischmination 
tov^/ard any person or group is not tolerated in any form by this Department. All persons have 
value and dignity. We exist to serwe all people with respect, fairness and compassion. While all 
are required equally to obey the law, all shall receive equal protection of the law. 

With community service as our foundation, we strive to enhance the quality of life in 
Swampscott. We are committed to a proactive approach to policing through problem solving. 
Working in concert with the citizens of Swampscott we seek to identify and solve the root causes 
of problems in the community rather than merely responding to individual incidents. It is our goal 
to eliminate the opportunities for crime and disorder in the community and to enhance the sense 
of security and safety of the public. 

We are committed to the prevention of crime and the protection of life and property, the 
preservation of peace, order and safety. It is our duty to uphold the laws of the Town of 
Swampscott, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and the United States of America. We 
consider the safeguarding of Constitutional guarantees paramount among our duties. 

We nurture public trust by holding ourselves to the highest standards of performance and 
ethics. The Swampscott Police Department is dedicated to the development of its members 
through effective training and leadership and to providing a quality work environment. 

We endeavor to fulfill our mission in the most effective and efficient manner, fully aware 
of our fiduciary responsibility as trustees of public funds. 

The Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001 

The greatest challenge faced by the Police Department during this period was the 
terrorist attacks of September 1 1 , 2001 in New York City and Washington D.C. 

The events of that day changed the way local law enforcement view their relationship to 
the rest of the nation and their role with regard to the threat of domestic terrorism. Every law 
enforcement agency, even a small police department like ours, has an obligation to be on the 
alert for suspicious persons or behavior which might relate to terrorist activity and to remain up to 
date on potential terrorist threats to the community and the rest of the country. This new role 
requires that we consider ourselves the first line of defense against terrorism. 

In October 2001 Sergeant Richard McCarriston, Officer David Skomurski and Officer Jay 
Locke, were sent to New York City in two Swampscott Police cruisers, to assist in shuttling 
counselors, chaplains and surviving family of those killed in the attacks within the secure area of 
"Ground Zero." 

While the Town of Swampscott was not the subject of direct attack all citizens were 
affected nonetheless. Many residents lost loved ones and friends in the attacks and the 
community as a whole shared a sense of anguish and disbelief. Moreover the community 
collectively experienced anger and apprehension due to this assault on the security and safety of 
our country. 

This crisis resulted in the Police Department receiving many calls regarding suspicious 
persons and activities. The Police Department was inundated with information of possible threats 
from a variety of sources including Federal and State law enforcement agencies. The channels of 
information, both to and from these agencies, were severely strained following the attacks. To 
cope with the volume of information we designated Sergeant Gary Lord as the terrorism 
information officer. It is now that officer's responsibility to forward information that we develop to 
the appropriate Federal and State agencies and ensure that our officers are informed as bulletins 
of law enforcement intelligence and terrorist threats are received. 

Following the exposure of the mail system to Anthrax, the threat of biological agents as a 
method of terrorism caused many residents to view common substances as threatening. As a 
result we were called upon to respond to numerous reports of suspicious substances The 
concern for biological hazards was widespread throughout the Commonwealth and the State's 



160 



resources were soon over taxed. We were required to quickly develop procedures to screen out 
innocuous matenals while at the same time ensunng that truly suspicious matenals were handled 
in a manner that minimized exposure to the officers and the public. Ultimately no tested materials 
were found to be harmful. 

Confronted with the generalized and continuing nature of the threat of terrorist attack, this 
Police Department, has worked with the Fire Department, the Town's Emergency Management 
Director, the Health Department as well as other departments in Town government to identify the 
needs of the community and to engage in emergency pre planning. 

In order to strengthen our ability to respond to a senous incident in the Town, all ranking 
officers participated in Incident Command Systems training held in conjunction with the Fire 
Department. This training established procedures to respond to a critical incident. In addition all 
police officers were trained as first responders to a critical incident. 

The Swampscott Police Department, along with the law enforcement community at large, 
continues to work to improve upon the means of communicating intelligence information and 
potential terrorist threats between agencies. 

The heightened state of alert under which the Police Department now operates requires 
that all officers be watchful for suspicious persons or activities in the community while remaining 
cognizant of the constitutional rights of all people. 

Community Policing 

The Swampscott Police Department has adopted as a philosophy the principles of 
Community Policing. Community Policing redefines the police mission to focus on solving 
problems rather than simply responding to calls for service. It requires that in addition to 
responding to individual incidents, that we examine series of calls to determine if a problem 
exists. The Police Department has worked to achieve relationships with a variety of public 
agencies, community organizations and citizens to allow us to work together to develop strategies 
to solve many of the problems, which affect the safety and quality of life in Swampscott. The 
objective of Community Policing is to increase the ability of the citizens of Swampscott to control 
the opportunities for crime and disorder to occur in their community. 

In 2001 and the first half of 2002 the Police Department conducted a variety of 
community programs supported by grants from the Massachusetts Executive Office of Public 
Safety and the United States Department of Justice as well as contributions from businesses and 
citizens In the Town. 

During the period covered by this report Community Policing funds were used for 
programs involving the Bike Patrol Unit, the School Resource Officers and the Traffic Unit. 
Officers were able to participate in many youth events, providing opportunities for officers and the 
children in Town to interact in positive ways. The Police Department and the Fire Department 
hosted two Public Safety Day events, both of which were well attended by the public. 

Bike Patrol officers conducted several bike safety presentations and bike rodeos during 
this time. With this emphasis on safety, officers gave out coupons for a free ice cream to kids 
observed wearing a helmet while biking or skating in an effort to re enforce this safe behavior. 
Officers provided free bike helmets to children who did not have one. 

Officers attended a variety of community meetings for the purpose of addressing public 
concerns about problems such as traffic and crime. These meetings enhanced our ability to 
identify the root causes of problems and to design solutions, which often required the contribution 
of multiple agencies and the community to solve. 

Bike Patrol Unit 

With grant funds the Police Department was able to maintain the Bike Patrol Unit. The 
Unit is staffed by ten officers who have been trained in the use of mountain bikes on patrol. The 
bike officers patrol areas in the Town that are not easily accessible to traditional methods of patrol 
and were used in our continuing effort to address problems of under age drinking at night in the 
Town's parks and beaches. Additionally the bike officers were used to patrol many events such 
as outdoor concerts and road races. Mountain bike officers have proven to be generally more 
accessible and approachable than officers patrolling in police cars and enjoy opportunities to 
interact more frequently and in positive ways with the public. 



161 



D.A.R.E. 

The Swampscott D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) program is a collaborative 
effort by D.A.R.E. certified law enforcement officers, educators, students, parents and the 
community to offer an educational program in the classroom to prevent or reduce drug abuse and 
s violence among children and youth. The emphasis of D.A.R.E. is to help students recognize and 

1 resist the many direct and subtle pressures that influence them to experiment with alcohol, 
3 tobacco, marijuana, inhalants, or other drugs or to engage in violence. 

2 The program content for D.A.R.E. is organized into seventeen 45 to 60 minute lessons 
taught with extended activities integrated into other instruction by the classroom teacher. The 
^ Swampscott Police D.A.R.E. Officer Rich Cassidy conducts weekly lessons for all students in 
^; grade 5. A Massachusetts D.A.R.E grant and public donations supports the Swampscott 
<• D.A.R.E. program. 

^ In addition to the D.A.R.E. curriculum the Police Department has provided students with 

^ many positive alternative activities. Twenty Swampscott students went to the D.A.R.E. summer 

2:. camp sponsored by the Police Department. The camp is attended by about four hundred students 

/J from area communities and is coordinated by the Essex County District Attorneys Office. 

D.A.R.E Officer Cassidy along with several other officers participated in the fifth grade field day 

and a Friday night basketball league for grades 6,7, and 8. 

School Resource Officers 

The Police Department has assigned two officers. Jay Locke and Tom Hennessey, to the 
schools on a full time basis. This has been possible as a result of grants received from the U.S. 
Department of Justice. The program is a cooperative effort between the Swampscott Police and 
School Department to put police officers in school settings. The officers work to promote a 
positive relationship with the school community and provide opportunities for interaction between 
police and students. The officer's presence acts as a deterrent to crime and provides a degree of 
security and safety for the school's students, faculty, and visitors. 

The School Resource Officers investigate any criminal activity that occurs in or around all 
school properties. The School Officers also follow up on cases involving students that occur 
outside of school, recognizing that many incidents carry over into the school setting. Officers 
address issues such aggressive bullying behavior by students and work to promote teen conflict 
resolution. Along with these duties the officers also provides classroom instruction on criminal 
law and other law enforcement topics. The officers present a classroom program to Middle 
School students that illustrate the dangers of drinking and driving,. Through the use of special 
goggle equipment students are able to see with the vision of a person with an elevated blood 
alcohol level. 

The School Officers along with the Lynn Juvenile Probation Department conducted 
curfew checks of juvenile residents who were on probation. 

The School Resource Officers in collaboration with the school community will continue to 
work to ensure that all students may receive an education in an environment free from 
harassment or threat of crime. 

Traffic Division 

The Traffic Division worked with the community to identify and address needs and 
problems concerning vehicle traffic and parking. All traffic related issues are forwarded to Captain 
Brian Chadwell and Sergeant Behen as the officers in charge of the unit. In an effort to solve 
traffic problems in the Town officers frequently met with community groups, individual residents 
and government officials. 

During the period of this report Officers worked to address neighborhood complaints 
regarding excessive truck traffic on Essex Street in Town. Selective Enforcement Patrols, which 
focused on violations perceived to have the greatest adverse impact upon the area, were 
regularly assigned to Essex Street. Special attention was given to vehicle speed and equipment 
violations. Fourteen Officers, assigned to conduct this enforcement, received specialized training 
needed to inspect trucks and cite for truck violations. The Swampscott Police Department along 
with the Massachusetts State Police Truck Team and the Lynn Police Traffic Unit, conducted two 
separate simultaneous truck enforcement stings, which targeted truck violations on Essex Street 



162 



and alternate routes. During this enforcement action numerous violations were issued and 
several unsafe trucks were removed from the road. 

This department purchased a Radar Speed Board with private and grant funds. This 
equipment enables us to measure traffic volume, vehicle types and vehicle speeds at a given 
location. In addition the board prominently displays the speed of approaching vehicles thus 
providing an effective reminder for operators to obey the posted speeds in Town. 

Two officers, Lieutenant Paul Bartram and Sergeant John Behen have received 
specialized training in accident investigators. These officers investigated one fatal accident and 
several collisions with serious injuries during this reporting period. 

Detective D ivi sion 

The Detective Division is comprised of a Detective Sergeant, Gary Lord and two 
detectives, Tim Cassidy and Ted Delano. Many crimes that occur in Swampscott involve multiple 
jurisdictions and require that the Detectives maintain a relationship with the Federal, State and 
local law enforcement agencies. 

The Detectives were responsible for following up on a variety of crimes that ranged from 
annoying telephone calls and credit card offences to burglaries, robberies and rapes. Additionally 
they were proactive in approaching cnme problems as well. Detectives conducted several 
undercover drug investigations arresting individuals who were actively dealing hallucinogenic 
mushrooms, ocycontin, ecstasy, cocaine, heroin and marijuana in Town. There were thirty-eight 
cases of illegal drug possession pursued by this office during this penod. 

The aggressive investigation of a series of condo break-ins in Town led to the arrest of 
two suspects believed to be responsible for a widespread crime spree and resulted in the 
recovery of many thousands of dollars in stolen property. 

This division oversaw the handling of 125 domestic abuses reports received by the 
Department. 

Emergency Medical Training 

Thirty regular officers were re-certified in the use of the Automatic External Defibrillator (AED). 
Lieutenant Jeanne Butler conducted the following training for the Department. 
Twenty-nine officers were re-certified as First Responders 
Thirty officers received CPR re-certification training. 

Three officers are currently certified Emergency Medical Technicians. 

Firearms Training 

Officers traveled to the Reserve Forces Training Area (RFTA) at Fort Devens in Ayer MA 
as access to training facilities becomes increasingly scarce. 

Firearms training was conducted by, Department Instructor Officer John R. Dube. 
Officer Dube is certified as an instructor by the Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training Council 
(MCJTC), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and Sigarms in Exeter, NH in the use of the AR- 
15 Patrol Rifle, Shotgun, Revolver, Semi-Auto Pistol, as well as the use of Chemical Agents, 
Handgun Retention and Patrol Baton. 

Sgt. Anthony M. Pizzi assisted in this period's training. Training for all officers included annual 
qualification in the use of service pistols under guidelines set forth by the Criminal Justice 
Training Council and familiarization with the AR-15 Patrol Rifle and Remington 12 Gauge 
shotgun. 

Sgt. Pizzi and Officer Dube became certified armorers of the Colt AR-15/M16 Rifle. With 
this training these officers can make the necessary repairs to the Department's equipment. 

The Massachusetts State Police S T O P. Team conducted specialized training with all 
officers. This training consisted of classroom instruction as well as field training on the response 
to an active shooter situation. In the event of a critical incident involving a hostage or an active 
shooting, officers are trained to set up a containment perimeter in preparation for the arrival of the 
S.T.O.P. Team, or if immediate action is required, officers are trained to act. Members of this 
department along with twenty members of the State Police S.T.O.P. Team participated in this 
exercise, which required officers to react to a series of realistic simulated incidents. 



163 



Training for all officers in the use of force was conducted at the police station. Policies 

for the use of non-lethal and lethal force were reviewed. This training covered the force options 

available based on the level of threat encountered by the officers. This training included use of 

verbal skills, self-defense techniques, chemical agents and the patrol baton, as well as lethal 

f force. 
1 

3 

3 In-Service Training 

^ All officers are required to attend three days of In-Service Training every two years. The 

a training is held at the Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training Council Academy in Reading, MA. 

I During this period five supervisors and nine patrolmen attended this training. 
::: Thirteen officers were re-certified in the use of the Intoxilizer 5000, the Department's 

5 breath alcohol tester. 

^ Department Statistics- January 2001 through June 2002 

^ Some of the more serious offenses that occurred during this period included: 

• 5 Rapes and 4 Indecent Assault & Batteries 

• 10 Robberies 

• 71 Breaking & Entering residential or commercial properties and 81 vehicle break-ins 

• 31 Motor Vehicles were stolen. 

• 38 Drug offenses were recorded. 



Incident Type 


Total 


Incident Type Total 




Accidental Alarm 


84 


Lost Property 


64 


Attempted B&E 


4 


Loud Music/Party 


105 


Accident under $1000 


244 


Missing Person 


18 


Accident over $1000 


186 


Missing Juvenile 


16 


Accident with personal injury 


59 


Disabled Motor Vehicle 


51 


Hit&Run motor vehicle accident 


50 


Motor Vehicle Stop 


2476 


Hit&Run MVA w/personal injury 


3 


Notification 


192 


Alarm 


1986 


Open Door/Window 


59 


Ambulance Call 


1111 


Protective Custody 


16 


Loose/Stray Dog 


60 


Parking Complaint 


371 


Injured Dog or Cat 


24 


Power Failure 


13 


Wildlife 


93 


Property Damage 


11 


Dog Bite 


15 


Recovered Property 


65 


Barking Dog 


35 


Recovered Motor Vehicle 


12 


Deceased Animal 


37 


Rape 


5 


Animal Complaint 


36 


Robbery 


10 


Annoying Calls 


100 


Stolen License Plate 


22 


Assist Fire Dept. 


35 


Stolen Motor Vehicle 


31 


Assault 


39 


Service Call 


469 


Assist other Police Depts. 


104 


Shoplifting 


28 


Break & Entering 


71 


Suspicious Motor Vehicle 


144 


B&E Motor Vehicle 


81 


Sudden Death 


15 


Building Check 


6212 


Suspicious Act 


638 


Bomb Threat 


3 


Threats 


46 


Cancelled Incident 


10 


Towed Motor Vehicle 


42 


Civil Matter 


27 


Tree Limb Down 


18 


Complaint 


627 


Traffic Investigation 


17 


Serving Court Papers 


182 


Trespassing 


9 


Disturbance 


192 


Truants 


22 


Domestic 


116 


Vandalism 


214 


DPW Notification 


155 


Violating 209A 


26 



164 



Drug Offense 


38 


Warrant Arrest 


30 


Assist Elderly 


42 


Wire Down 


62 


Erratic Operation 


59 


Disturbance 


56 


Fire Alarm 


70 


Loitering 


28 


Found Property 


92 


Noisy Group Inside 


10 


Fireworks Complaint 


42 


Noisy Group Outside 


26 


False 911 Call 


86 


Drinking Indoors 


4 


Fire 


113 


Drinking Outdoors 


11 


Hate Crime 


1 


Skateboard/Rollerblade 


16 


Hazardous Conditions 


99 


Youth Trespassing 


16 


Indecent Assault & Battery 


4 


Vandalism/Graffiti 


20 


Larceny 


286 


911 Hang Up 


363 


Lockout 


30 







TOTAL: 18,887 

During the period covered by this report the Police Department made 273 arrests. 
Officers wrote 1,713 motor vehicle citations. 

• 693 Written Warnings 

• 817 Civil Violations- With fines totaling $91 ,575 

• 118 Criminal Violations 

• 85 Motor Vehicle Arrests 

Personnel Changes 

In May of 2001 Chief John Toomey retired. 

In November 2001 Lieutenant Richard Wilson retired. 

In January 2002 Officer John Corcoran retired. 

In April 2001 Brian Wilson was hired as a permanent Patrol Officer. 

In December 2001 Candace Doyle was hired as a permanent Patrol Officer. 

In June 2002 Michael Frayler and Chris Falasca were hired as permanent Patrol Officers. 

In May 2001 Thomas Stephens was promoted to Lieutenant and William Waters to 

Sergeant. 

In August 2001 Ronald Madigan was promoted to Chief of Police and Brian Chadwell to 
Captain. 

In January 2002 Paul Bartram was promoted to Lieutenant. 
Respectfully Submitted, 



Ronald J. Madigan 
Chief of Police 



165 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



The Board of Public Works experienced many changes this year. Alan F. Taubert, P.E., 
P.L.S. retired as the Superintendent and Town Engineer of Swampscott after eleven years of 
service and was replaced with Silvio J. Baruzzi, P.E. in September of 2001. The Board welcomes 
Mr. Baruzzi to Swampscott. On July 1, 2002. the Board changed from an elected Board to an 
appointed Board along with other changes in Town government. 

It was again another busy year for the Department. It continues to work cooperatively with 
other Boards Committees, Commission, Town Departments and residents and would like to thank 
them all for their assistance during the past year. 

The annual water project was completed with new pipes installed in Norfolk Avenue, 
Eastman Avenue, Beach Avenue and Mountain Avenue. This project is funded by an interest free 
loan from the MWRA. The Board continues to have this project designed and administered by the 
Board's staff at a considerable savings. 

The following streets (or partial) were paved during the year: Robin Lane, Muriel Road, 
Bates Road, Puritan Road, Middlesex Avenue, Forest Avenue, Nason Road, Walker Road, 
Swampscott Avenue, Laurel Road, Banks Road, Kensington Lane, Glen Road, Ellis Road 

For the eleventh year, the Department was a recipient of "Tree City USA" award. 

The Department continues with its annual, paving, sidewalk repair, pump station 
maintenance and repairs, street line painting, grass cutting, flower and tree planting, as well as its 
day to day work including street sweeping, pruning, meter replacement and repair, water testing, 
low water pressure, painting, litter control, beach maintenance, sewer backups drain and catch 
basin maintenance, signs, park maintenance and hydrant flushing. The Department also maintains 
the Town's cemetery and provides in house engineering services. 

The Fosters Dam area booster water pumping station project has been completed and will 
provide better water service for residents in that area. 

The Department was able to purchase two new trucks and sanders this year to better 
serve the public in the snow and ice season. 

The Department of Public Works has been pleased to assist the 150'^ Birthday Celebration 
Committee in preparing for the many wonderful events offered to the public. The Board wishes 
Swampscott a very happy birthday. 

The Department worked closely with the Histoncal Commission and Selectmen's Office to 
facilitate a grant for the Town Administration Building. In addition, the Department worked with the 
Recreation Commission in procuring an architect for the Field House Addition. 

The Board of Public Works instituted a $25.00 grass and leaf disposal fee at the 
Swampscott Cemetery. This was necessary to offset the new cost of transporting these materials 
to a different disposal as a result of our loosing our former location on Danvers Road. 

The office staff continues to provide ongoing dedication and service to the Town residents. 
The Board appreciates their efforts. 



Respectfully submitted 

Robert E. DiLisio, Chairman 
Robert C. Jaeger, Member 
Lawrence F. Picariello, Member 



Silvio J. Baruzzi, P.E., 
Superintendent of Public Works 
Town Engineer 



166 



RECREATION COMMISSION 



Andrew B. Holmes, Chairman 
Eve Gambale Leslie Kiely 

Paul Gorman David Whelan 

John Hughes 



The policy of the Recreation Commission is to provide worthwhile leisure time activities for all 
age groups in the community. We continue to improve the areas and programs sponsored 
directly by the Commission which include parking areas, beaches and lifeguards, adult and youth 
tennis, teen fitness and conditioning, street hockey, playground activities, youth and teen sailing, 
track and field, youth and adult basketball, and a field house recreation center. We also provide 
both beach and railroad parking stickers for a fee. 

Participation in our programs continues to increase and we continue to try to minimize costs. 
The collected fees turned in to the Town General Fund for the period January 2001 through June 
2002 totaled $68,798. 

Work continues on our plan for a new track at Phillips Park, and our latest and most exciting 
large project is an addition to the field house to accommodate a girls' locker room. We received 
funding for architect's drawings for the proposed addition and plan to display these drawings in 
town to spark interest in this project and perhaps secure public funding and/or volunteer labor. 

There seems to be a renewed interest in our sailing program, and in this connection we are 
looking into updating and/or purchasing new boats 

We have instituted a new policy of having all children enrolled in our summer programs fill out 
medical questionnaires to ensure the safety of all those entrusted to our care. We are also 
working towards hiring more park leaders and program directors because of growing safety 
concerns. 

In our ongoing effort to keep our sports facilities up to date we have had tennis and basketball 
courts repaired and relined. 

The Commission wishes to thank the Board of Public Works, the Department of Public Works 
and their staff for the maintenance of equipment in our facilities. The Commission also wishes to 
thank the School Administration for use of their facilities. We also extend our thanks to the 
volunteer personnel needed to conduct our programs. 



167 



CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT SYSTEM 



John T. Kiely, Jr., Chairman 
David Castellarin, Ex-Officio John F. Behen Jr., Elected 

; Christopher Thomson, Elected Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr., Esq., Appointed 

I Richard P. DiPesa, Esq., Retirement Administrator 

i Established in 1937, the Swampscott Contributory Retirement System is administered by 

1 a five-member Retirement Board, with one full-time administrator and one part-time assistant. 

The Board is governed by Chapter 32 of the Massachusetts General Laws and by the Public 
% Employee Retirement Administration Commission, a state agency that provides guidance and 

5 oversight for 106 Massachusetts Retirement Boards. Membership in the plan is mandatory 

^ immediately upon commencement of employment for all permanent employees. The plan is a 

5 contributory defined benefit plan covering all Town employees deemed eligible by the Retirement 

^ Board, with the exception of schoolteachers, who contribute to the Massachusetts Teachers' 

Retirement Board. The System provides for retirement allowance benefits up to a maximum of 
80% of a member's highest three-year average annual rate of regular compensation. Benefit 
payments are based upon a member's age, length of creditable service, salary and group 
classification. Members become vested after ten years of service. For certain hazardous duty 
and public safety positions, maximum retirement is at age 65. A retirement allowance consists of 
an annuity, which represents members' accumulated total deductions including interest and a 
pension portion, which is funded by the Town. The average retirement benefit is 80-85% pension 
15-20% annuity. In 2001 and 2002, the Board voted to offer its members who had been retired for 
at least one year a three-percent (3%) cost-of-living adjustment up to a base of $12,000.00, 
pursuant to the provisions of Mass. Gen. Laws, Chapter 32, §103. 

Active members contribute either 5,7,8 or 9% of their gross regular compensation to the 
Retirement System, determined by the date upon which the employee enters the service of the 
town. Any member hired after January 1, 1979 contributes an additional 2% on wages over $ 
30,000.00. As mandated by law, the Retirement Board has a fiduciary responsibility to the 
members and retirees of the system and to properly invest the fund's assets, totaling 
approximately $24M. In order to properly invest the system's assets, the Retirement Board 
engages the service of an asset consultant, Segal Advisors, and six investment managers. In 
addition, the Board also has an actuarial valuation performed every other year, the most recent 
being as of December 31, 2001. According to the January 1, 2000 valuation, the Retirement 
System is 66.3% funded vs. 46.8% as of January 1, 1998. The Unfunded Actuarial Liability is 
$13.8M. The System will be fully funded by the year 2022, six years ahead of the original funding 
plan. Every Massachusetts Public Retirement System must be fully funded by the year 2028. 

During the period January 1, 2001 -June 30, 2002 the Swampscott Retirement Board 
further diversified the management of the fund's assets by hiring with Chase Investment Counsel 
of Charlottesville, \/A large cap equity manager. During the year 2001, the Contnbutory 
Retirement System ranked 21^' out of 106"" in total return on investment of all of the 
Commonwealth's Contributory Retirement Systems. 

In August, 2001, an election was held, and the incumbent Board Member, Christopher 
Thomson was re-elected by the members of the retirement system to serve until August 1 1 , 2004. 
In June, 2001, the Retirement Board hired Attorney Richard DiPesa to serve as Retirement 
Administrator, and subsequently hired Mrs. Patricia Zuchero on a part-time basis as the Board's 
Administrative Assistant. 

In January, 2002, the Board relocated its offices to the Railroad Avenue Professional 
Building. This has enabled all Board Members and staff to perform their duties and conduct 
monthly meetings from a centralized location. 

The Board Members and Staff are also working to enhance service to the members by 
utilizing the latest technology and further automating office procedures. In addition. Board 
Members and staff regularly attend educational conferences and seminars sponsored by the 



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Public Employees' Retirement Administration Commission. Fiscal Year 2003 looks to be 
exciting and productive year for the Swampscott Contributory Retirement System. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John T. Kiely, Jr., Chairman 



169 



SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
January 1, 2001 - June 30, 2002 

Kevin Breen, Chairman 
Mary DeChillo, Vice Chair 
Arthur Goldberg 
Shelley A. Sackett 
Dan Yaeger 

Regular meetings, second and fourth Thursday of each month. 
Public is welcome. 

Dr. Brian C. Coughlin, Superintendent of Schools 596-8800 
Maureen Szymczak, Director of Pupil Personnel Services 596-8805 
Kevin Oliver, Asst. Supt for Business & Personnel 596-8802 

The office of the Superintendent of Schools, located at 207 Forest Avenue, is open every weekday from 8:00 
a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

SCHOOL PRINCIPALS 

High School 596-8830 
Middle School 596-8820 
Clarke School 596-8812 
Hadley School 596-8847 
Machon School 596-8835 
Stanley School 596-8837 



Peter B Sack 
Ronald Landman, Ed.D. 
Carolyn Murphy 
Lois Longin 
Kevin Cushman 
Caria Guarnieri 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the members of the Swampscott School Committee and the citizens of Swampscott: I take great pleasure 
and genuine pride in presenting the Annual Report to the Town of Swampscott. 

I am proud to serve the Town of Swampscott and its most precious resource - the children. It is the Mission of 
the Swampscott Public Schools to promote excellence by providing a viable and comprehensive instructional 
program pre-kindergarten through grade twelve leading to the attainment of knowledge, competencies, and 
skills which, upon completion, will enable each student to function as a maximally competent citizen, worker 
and self-fulfilling individual. 

PERSONNEL 

Listed below are the personnel changes that have taken place during the year 2000. To those who have either 
resigned or retired, we would like to extend our sincere appreciation for their outstanding years of dedicated 
service to the children of Swampscott and to wish them much success in their future endeavors. 
CENTRAL OFFICE: 
Appointments: 

Maureen Caron 



SYSTEM WIDE: 

New Appointments: 

Holly Brennan 
Gilda Melcher 

Resignations: 

Deborah Dixson 



Andrea Gilguilin 
Maureen Szymczak 



Joan Gregory 



Linda Marquis 



HIGH SCHOOL: 

New Appointments: 



William Bush 
Reeva Oppenheim 
James Pearse 
Kristen Vogel 
Joanna DeFeo 



Meaghan Dalton 
Thomas Healey 
Doris Gallant 
Russell King 
Sarah Meier 
Ana Monteiro 



Cristine Picariello 
Jonathan Shapiro 
Eve Friedman 
Julie Henning 
Kathleen Solazzo 
Jane Heisey 



Nancy O'Brien 
Ana Jordan 
Steven Schwartz 
Steven Simmons 
Karen St. Claire 
Holly Tatum 



170 



Thomas Maccarone 
Joanna Ganci 
Jeanette Sedgwick 
Anita Balliro 
Chnstopher Balliro 
Martha Keenan 
Lucy Pendelton 

Resignations: 

Mary Malcolm 
Susan Duncan 
Margaret lorio 
Bowen Kerins 
Sara Lonberg-Lew 
Steven Duchon 
Jami Mock 

Leaves of Absence: 
Lisa Green 
Eva Holm-Andersen 

Transfers: 

Gayle Zipper 

Retirements: 

James Coffin 
Clayton Curtis 
Ann Greenbaum 



Christopher Ratley 
Mary Beth O'Malley 
Audrey Brown 
Bryan Paquette 
Joanna Ganci 
Lucy Pendelton 
Brenda Samiljan 

Ruth Rubin 
Peter Martino 
Mallie MacNeil 
Lisa Rapisarda 
Jennifer Reen 
Susan Fantasia 
Maureen Reiser 

Michael Kane 
Kimberly Sokop 

Nancy O'Brien 

Peter Juntunen 
James Kalloch 
Susan Kalloch 



Thomas Kerans 
Liliana Litle 
Linda Marquis 
Josephine Uminski 
Boriana Georgieva 
Ana Sousa 



Hope Kazek 
Susan Pineault 
Steven Simmons 
Eugene Haskell 
Gretchen Carpenter 
Wilbur Higgins 



Patricia Maitland 



Janice Hannify 

Douglas Maitland 
Hildegard Davis 
Donald Babcock 



Charlotte Upham 
Anna Sclafani 
Gretchen Carpenter 
Scott Kaplan 



Richard Brown 
Jessica George 
Matthew Gladstone 
Mary Ronan 
Laurie Bragan 
Lori Hodin 



Andrea Jordan 

Tom Maccarone 
Allen Shapiro 
Donald Streeter 



MIDDLE SCHOOL 

New Appointments 

Kevin Marques 
Gayle DaMore 
David Gogan 
Ellen Mills 

Resignations: 

Tim Cobbett 
Debra Swanson 

Retirements: 

Frank DeFelice 

Leaves of Absence: 
Maura Rocco 
Cheryl Kirkpatrick 

Transfers: 

Sara Kennelly 
Tonja Lynch 



Ashley Mast 
Jennifer Pauley 
Dennison Davison 
Cynthia Tennant 

Lisa Gopen 
David Gagnon 



Linda Almeida 
Colleen Beatrice 
Donna Friedrich 



Stephen Collbert 
Thomas Zabroski 



Paul Bergeron 
Stephen Colbert 
Kimberly Maraio 



Kelly Dolan 



Janice Hannify 
Andrea Jordan 



CLARKE SCHOOL 

New Appointments: 

Jody Ann Feudo 
Karen Moriarty 
Debra Lorusso 

Retirements: 

Corinne Nelson 

Leaves of Absence: 

Kelley Howells 



Karen Hallion 
Erica Gilefsky 
Christine Marques 

Tom Nelson 

Timothy Dewing 



Paula Malig 
Corrie Colorusso 
Keith Sylvia 



HADLEY SCHOOL 

New Appointments: 
Sheila Benson 



Susan Booras 



Holly Brennan 



Carolyn Cohen 



171 



Elda Brewster 
Kristin Giannino 
Colleen McCarthy 
Laura Weiss 

Resignations: 

Meredith Salt 

Retirements: 

Elizabeth Gilbert 

Transfers: 

Rebecca Bucklin 
Nancy Randall 

MACHON SCHOOL 

New Appointments: 
Mayumi Kato 
Katie Cillo 
Brooke Tupper 

Leaves of Absence: 

Susan Chapman 

Retirements: 

Janet Cook 

Resignations 

Mary Lowery 



Kathleen Eckman 
Joan Gregory 
Gilda Melcher 
Cynthia Wilson 

Elizabeth Tibbo 

Eleanor Smith 

Alison Draves 



Tracey Zimirowski 
Alya Rameos 



Teri Gadman 
Daryl Isles 
Julia Gorman 



Eileen Dineen 
Sami Lawler 



Mary Bragan 
Bradford Gile 



Meghan McCauley 
Meredith Salt 
Eliz. Tibbo 



Arlene Rosen 



Mary Lowery 
Nancy Snow 



Andrew MacAulay 



Brooke Tupper 



STANLEY SCHOOL 

New Appointments: 

Kerri Clarke Kirsten Conroy Allison Draves Laura Goodman 

Lindsay Hayes Michael Huelin Meather McCarthy Sharon Santry 

Kathlelen Roberto Daryl Isles 



INSTRUCTION 

Some of the highlights for 2000-2001 in each school are as follows: 

HIGH SCHOOL 

MAJOR CHANGES 

A Formal Mentoring Program 

With the arrival of so many new teachers to our school and to our system, and in response to requests from 
teachers and parents, we have continued to refine and formalize our mentoring program. Every attempt has 
been made to provide a supportive mentor to each first year teacher at Swampscott High School. Mentors 
and mentees meet weekly on an informal basis and periodically on a more formal basis. They engage in a 
variety of activities designed to ease the transition to SHS for our newest staff members. 
Special Education Changes 

In our continuing effort to meet the broad range of student needs within our school, we are constantly 
re-examining programs and services offered to our students. In addition to our Life Skills Program, the 
Learning Center, and two resource rooms, we have added this year a Language Based Learning Center to our 
list of available services to our special needs students. Staffed by Ms. Josephine Uminski and Ms. Holly 
Tatum, the language based classroom will provide important supportive services to our students. Again, in 
response to a request by both parents and teachers, each of our special education teachers is co-teaching an 
English, Mathematics, Social Studies and Science course at the freshman level alongside a regular education 
teacher to assist our students and teachers in courses that have a large percentage of special needs students. 
It is our hope and expectation that in future years this service will be expanded to include sophomore, junior 
and senior classes as well. 
Accreditation Follow-Up 

Swampscott High School was evaluated in October, 2000 by a fifteen member Visiting Committee from the 
New England Association of Schools and Colleges. We received the final evaluation report in late winter, 
2001 . The report contained numerous commendations highlighting the many strengths of our school, and at 



172 



the same time, identified those areas where we need to focus our attention. During the course of this coming 
school year, the faculty and staff of SHS are spending a great deal of time writing a Special Progress Report 
due February 1 , 2002, as well as writing the Two-Year Follow-Up Report due October 1 , 2002. Both of these 
reports are necessary in order for SHS to maintain its accreditation. 
The National Honor Society Qualify ing Averag e 

The National Honor Society Faculty Council voted to raise the National Honor Society qualifying average for 
the 2001-2002 school year to an unweighted cumulative grade point average of 88 or higher The average will 
be raised once again for the 2002-2003 school year to an unweighted cumulative grade point average of 90 or 
higher. In addition to having to maintain a higher GPA, students are also evaluated on the basis of character, 
leadership and service; the other three criteria considered essential for induction in to the National Honor 
Society. 

Building Improvements 

Over the course of the summer our custodial staff worked feverishly to improve the physical environment at 
SHS. At the high school the most significant changes have been in the Shaw Wing (the older wing) of the high 
school where new ceiling tiles and lighting fixtures have been installed both in the first and second floor 
corndors. The school has also received a major facelift with a fresh coat of paint as well. We are proud of the 
appearance of our school and urge parents to encourage their sons and daughters to respect the building and 
its contents. 

School Council Initiatives 

The Swampscott High School Improvement Plan for the year 2001 has five specific goals: 

1. Develop, fund and begin to implement a short-term and long-term capital improvement plan to 
address all identified facility issues including, but not limited to, those related to technology, 
supplies, building maintenance, the gymnasium, the little theater, damaged ceiling tiles, broken 
safety glass, broken railings, and storage for practical arts, athletics, the cafeteria, and for 
custodians. 



2. Provide an adequate number of guidance counselors with sufficient time to ensure the full 
implementation of guidance and counseling services to effectively meet the needs of all students 
served by the school. 

3. Fund, update, and expand the print and non-print collection, and information retrieval technology 
of the library media center to ensure that it supports all areas of the curriculum. 

4. Develop and begin to implement a plan to effectively meet the needs of at-risk students. 

5. Provide adequate support and time for special education faculty to fulfill administrative 
responsibilities, to ensure the timely dissemination of student information to regular education 
faculty, and to meet the learning needs of students. 

MIDDLE SCHOOL 

SCHOOLCOUNCILGOALS 

The School Council improvement goals address resources for MCAS preparation, communication between the 
school/parents, students' decisions involving interpersonal issues, and the inadequate resources due to the 
facility's limitations. 

KEY CONCERNS FOR ACHIEVING SCHOOL COUNCIL PLA N 

The most significant and common concern for improving the educational opportunities within the Swampscott 
Middle School is inadequate funding. The goals collectively require revenues for staffing, utility upgrades in 
the building, and educational material and equipment. Generating these revenues are very challenging due to 
the community's limited ability to increase revenues without raising taxes of individual homeowners and 
Inadequate state funding. One strategy is to design a list of priorities and designate the available funding 
toward meeting these requests. This is the intention of the Swampscott Middle School Council. 
CURRICULUM AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS 

Computer instruction continues to be a high priority. Computer specialist Barbara Wills offers a senes of 
workshops to demonstrate technology in the classroom. The emphasis is on the "one computer classroom." 
In addition, due to MCAS language test being administered to seventh grade students, the seventh grade 
language arts teachers receive materials emphasizing the MCAS language arts framework and previous test 
items. Equally important is the constant response to prepanng students for different high school programs. 
Each department constantly assesses the relevance and effectiveness of the curricula to ensure the students' 



173 



receiving the optimum opportunity to be successful at the next level. 
STUDENT PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES 

The Swampscott Middle School students have the opportunity to participate in interscholastic and intramural 
athletics, mathematics team, spelling bee, theater productions, chorus, band, student council, yearbook staff, 

; and peer leaders. Middle School teachers also volunteer a variety of activities, including quiz bowl, and 

i adopt-a-grandparent program. 

I PTO ACTIVITIES 

J Although the PTO appreciates the large membership, the actual working body is comparatively small The 

I executive board and a small group of parents continue to work vigorously to fund-raise and provide activities 

for students. Examples of this include: the Magic Mile Road Race and Sixth Grade Fun Night. These efforts 
directly assist in contributing finances and good morale between the faculty and students by supporting 

u assemblies, emergency phone services, staff team building exercises and many educational expenses not 

t available in the budget. 

I ACKNOWLEDGEMENT FOR TEACHERS AND PARENTS 

S The Swampscott Middle School community continues to distinguish itself in terms of recognition for 

preparation of students for the next level, a professionally competent faculty, and supportive parents. 
Confirmation for these distinctions results from the success and recognition of the students in their respective 
high schools, the constant drive among the faculty for professional growth and improvement in instruction, and 
the parents' willingness to contribute time, expertise, and funding to resolve the many existing challenges. 

CLARKE SCHOOL 

GOALS OF SCHOOL COUNCIL 

School Council will devise a needs assessment survey. This was accomplished in Spring 2002. The School 
Improvement Plan will be a collaborative effort among staff, school council, parents, students and the principal 
that reflects the needs of our school. 
KEY POINTS IN SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN 

• Staff will continue to teach students to write well-organized, fully developed compositions with 
comprehensive supporting details and a clear focus to help meet state standards. 

• Staff will continue to teach students to use problem solving, communicating, reasoning and connecting 
to explore, develop, investigate and know: number sense; patterns, relations and functions; geometry 
and measurements; and statistics and probability to meet demands of MCAS testing. 

• Clarke School will use technology as an essential teaching tool across the curhculum 

• Clarke School building and grounds will continue to be repaired to reflect pride in our school. 

• The children at Clarke School will continue to exhibit age appropriate social and conflict resolution 
skills that demonstrate an increased understanding and respect for diversity. 

MAJOR SCHOOL PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES 

• Third grade students continue to coordinate and implement our weekly recycling program 

• Kindergarten teachers held a "Popsicle in the Park" for their incoming students and parents as an 
orientation in August, 2001. 

• Clarke School held several fund raisers to provide assistance to the families of the victims of 
September 1 1 , 2001 . Donations were made to the N.Y. Police and Fire Widows' and Children's 
Benefit Fund Inc 

• Kindergarten classes visited Smolak Farms as part of their social studies program. They also visited 
the Swampscott Fire Station 

• Clarke School began their first Breakfast Program with the Fine Hosts and SPS Food Service 

• The 13'^ Annual Thanksgiving Feast for the entire school was hosted by Mrs. Nelson, Mrs. Wynne, 
parents, PTA and Gr 3 on November 19. Clarke School also had a food and clothing drive to benefit 
My Brother's Table in Lynn and The Inn Between in Peabody. This event helps children to reflect 
about what they are thankful for and the importance of helping others. 

Clarke School held their Open House/Curriculum Night in November, 2001. 

• Gr. 5 Leaders Club participated in the Toys for Local Children drive. 

• Skills for Life Program was introduced to Clarke School. Staff and children participated in the training. 
The daily pledge and self-control times have been part of our daily routine. 

Community Service Learning Projects: Book Brigade collected books and donated them to the Lynn 
Community Health Center. Gr 4 sponsored a planting of a tree to replace the one cut down in Abbott 



174 



Park. 

• Gr 4 and Gr 5 participated in the National Geography Bee. 

• Gr 5 Leaders' Club continues to run the after school Homework Club three days a week. 

• Lauren Valle, Gr 5, represented Clarke School at the Annual Lynn Daily Item's Spelling Bee and she 
came in fifth place. 

• Kindergarten teachers organized and ran an informative Kindergarten Orientation and Visitation Day 
for parents and children. 

• Gr 2-5 attended North Shore Music theater's Science Circus. 

• Gr 5 participated in the DARE Program under the direction of officer Rich Cassidy. 

• Clarke School participated in the SPED Coordinated Review process. Staff was interviewed and 
observed by the visiting team. 

• Gr K presented a show, "The Kinder Garden (5/01). The 2002 K class performed "The Kinder Picnic 
"in 6/02 Gr 3 performed in the productions of "Essex County Yesterday and Today" and "History, 
Heroes, and Heroines" celebrating Swampscott's 150"^ anniversary as a town. 

• Gr 5 went on a whale watch, visited the U.S.S. Constitution and the Saugus Ironworks. 

• Clarke School Science Fair for Gr 3-5 was held in 5/01 and 5/02. 

• Clarke School Gr 5 participated in a Student/Staff Exchange Day. Students plan an activity and they 
have it approved by the staff member. It is an opportunity to switch roles and to foster responsibility. 

• Annual Awards Assemblies for Gr 4-5 were held with students receiving Presidential Awards for 
Excellence and Achievement. There were also awards in the fine arts and physical education. 

• Gr 5 presented a "Moving On" Program for parents and Gr 4. They produced a digital yearbook. 

• The 2001 yearbook was dedicated to Tom Nelson Nelson and the 2002 yearbook was dedicated to 
Corinne Nelson. 

• Gr 1 presented "The First Grade Salutes the Flag" to celebrate Flag Day 

• Clarke School Extended Day/After School and Early Morning Programs continue to grow. 

• K classes and Gr 3, 4, and 5 collaborated to form "Learning Buddies" for math and reading. 

• Clarke School hosted a "Volunteer Appreciation Tea" to thank all the volunteers to help out in the 
school. 

• An All School Farewell Assembly is held on the last day of school at 1:15 p.m. 
PTA ACTIVITIES 

The PTA set up a committee to refurbish Abbott Park playground. The Georgia Sea Island Singers 
performed for Gr K-5. The Annual Clarke School Halloween Party was held. PTA ran a gift wrap fund raiser 
which raised almost $8,000. Gr 4-5 worked with a writer in residence, Jeffrey Kelly. They then shared their 
writings with family and friends at a nighttime performance. K and Gr 1 classes were treated to a "Mother 
Goose Storyteller." Gr 2 and 3 participated in "Art Quest," an art appreciation program. Gr 3-5 went to the 
Tsongas Center as part of their social studies work. Clarke School Book Fairs were held. Proceeds from this 
fund raiser help to purchase library books. Pta sponsored the Scholastic Book Fair. PTA sponsored the 
Annual Holiday Fair. Clarke School community donated "used gifts." Children are given play money and are 
given the opportunity to shop for friends and relatives for the holiday. Staff is treated to a special lunch. 
Mohegan Sun Tribe performed at the school. Tony Vacca and Tim Moran, musicians, performed as p art of 
our school-wide study of Afnca. Storyteller Derek Burrows performed for Gr K-5. Bamidele Dancers 
performed as part of our study of Africa. PTA sponsored the Clarke School visit to China with dance 
performers, calligraphy workshops, Chinese luncheon, and a dragon parade. A biography of Clara Barton and 
Louisa May Alcott were performed for Gr K-5. Boston Ballet presented workshops for Gr 3-5. PTA funded an 
after-school course to strengthen writing and test taking skills needed to improve MCAS performance. Gr 3 
participated in Ken Carrier's "Owl Pellets" workshop. PTA sponsored the Cow Plot Country Fair and raised 
approximately $9,000. Clarke School PTA participated in the Annual July 4 Parade as well as the 150'^ 
Birthday Celebration of the Town of Swampscott. PTA runs after school classes and activities. PTA continues 
to sponsor "Boxtops for Education as a fundraiser. 
CURRICULUM AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS 

Elementary staff participated in our Early Release Day Program for Staff Development. Project Read, 
STC science kits, technology and hands-on math strategies were covered. Art specialist, Anne Bowen, 
coordinated and ran the staff development program for the elementary fine arts program dunng our Early 
Release Day Program. Clarke School staff members took the CPR course offered by SPS. Clarke School 
staff was trained in the Lesson One Program. Several staff members participated in the Summer Mentoring 



175 



1 



Institute run by SPS. Staff members also attended summer technology courses. Susan Kornfeld, reading 
specialist, continued participating in her Reading Recovery workshops. Ann McFarlane, Connne Nelson and 
Pamela Angelakis attended the annual MA Reading Conference. Carolyn Murphy attended the MCAS 
Administrators' Workshop. Sarah Zam, librarian/media specialist, has been a technology instructor for our 
Professional Development Program taught after school and at the annual Summer Institutes. Ann McFarlane 
sponsored a high school student for internships for the Child Development Course. Clarke School staff 
participated in the Physical Restraint Training. Several phmary teachers participated in the Project Read 
Spelling and Science Curriculum Review Study groups. Several Clarke School staff took the Autism course 
offered by SPS. 

HADLEY SCHOOL 

GOALS OF SCHOOL COUNCIL 

To provide a range of perspectives on challenges facing the schools as well as advise and collaborate with the 
principal in developing and implementing the school's improvement plan. 
SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN GOALS 

1. To provide for student wellness through systemic and school based initiatives addressing social and 
emotional learning. 

2. To implement an on-site computer facility to achieve technological proficiency vital in our current 
world. 

3. Through a variety of teaching techniques, children's learning styles and developmental needs will be 
addressed and children will be provided with an opportunity to reach their highest level of 
achievement. 

4. The appearance, maintenance, and repair of Hadley School will reflect an atmosphere that is 
conducive to excellence in learning. 

CURRICULUM AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS 

1 . Continued training in all three strands of Project Read 

2. Design new Grade One spelling program to align with Project Read 

3. Continued training on new STC Science Kits 

4. Overviews of Math/Science Frameworks 

5. Connections of Math/Science to Literacy 

6. Classroom Management training 

7. "Lesson One - Skills for Life" - training and implementation 
STUDENT PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES 

• Student Council, Chorus, D.A.R.E., Basketball, Recycling, Reading Buddies, Homework Club, K-Door 
Greeters, Grade Level Community Service, School Store, Halloween Parade, Enrichment Classes, 
Thanksgiving Feast, Numerous field trips, Literacy Celebration, Grade Level Student Performances, 
Donation to NSCH, Trip to Bertram House, Science Fair, Geography Bee, Battle of the Books, Spelling 
Bee, 100"" Day Celebration, Activity Day, Clean-Up-Fall & Spring, Vanety of other Student Council 
activities, Jump Rope for Heart, Pennies for Leukemia, Selling Hadley Notecards, '"Lesson One - 
Skills for Life." 

PTA ACTIVITIES 

• Kindergarten Picnic, Halloween Haunt, Book Fair, Holiday Fair, Family Roller Skating, Wrapping Paper 
Drive, Yearbook, P.T.A. Dinner, Parent Place, After School Programs, Teacher Wish List, Adopt-A- 
Salmon, Playground Fund, Lesson-One - Skill for Life, Volunteer Program, Hadley Gardening Club, 
Spring Clean-Up, Spring Arts Festival, Phone Pals, Humanities, A+ America, Box Tops for Education. 

ENRICHMENT 

• Bay Colony Educators, Native American Perspectives, Puppeteer, Historical Perspectives, Museum of 
Science, Art Quest, Massachusetts Cultural Grant - Creative Writing Residency. 

MACHON SCHOOL 

Curriculum and Program Highlights: 

This year the reading and writing curriculum continues to be the major curricular focus at Machon. 
Primary teachers have met repeatedly to hear how colleagues approach the acquisition of reading skills within 
their classrooms. Due to this dialog, teachers are now sharing more in terms of their pedagogical 
philosophies, teaching strategies and materials. Staff are looking at the K-3 continuum more holistically and 
are ordenng matenals that will serve that continuum. This effort has promoted a school-wide initiative towards 
improved reading scores and practical, everyday usage. Additionally, specific reading services begin in the 



176 : 

L 



r 

classroom with tSacher-directed group lessons specifically tailored to meet individual skill acquisition All 
elementary staff have received training in the "Project Read" methodology. This has positively impacted 
phonemic av^/areness and skill acquisition. Some support staff services have been reviewed and re- 
coordinated to better meet the needs of those children who display reading skills acquisition challenges. In all 
these cases, actual hours of services to these children have increased, while both the amount of time out of 
the classroom and interventions with different support staff have decreased. The staff will continue to look at 
materials that will enhance decoding, encoding, and comprehension skills as well as enhance a continuity of 
the instructional continuum beyond the primary grades. In the writing domain, staff continue to employ graphic 
organizers in an attempt to assist children with the organization of their writing. Systemic use of the writing 
rubrics has also improved writing throughout the school. 

Mathematics represents one of Machon School's priorities. Teachers have decided to utilize a 
'maintenance' approach to daily homework so as to avoid the all too common, "We never learned that" 
response often heard months after a specific skill was taught. Each teacher also incorporated a mat minute 
fact test' drill each day. It is our hope that this mechanism, coupled with math fact review at home, will assist 
students with the fact families. 

This year the Machon School has moved to a single platform in our computer lab. Each of these 
computers is now able to accommodate system software. Due to the efforts of our staff and this new 
hardware, students now embrace writing due to computer facilitation of the process. Spelling checks and 
thesaurus companions make improving one's writing not only challenging but also fun, in a meaningful way, 
which makes sense in today's world. 

2001-2002 Theme : "PRACTICE RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS AND CHARACTER" 
SCHOOL COUNCIL GOALS: 

This year the School Council will focus on both the school budget and look at the bullying issue. 
Over the last twelve months the Council generated a student survey on Conflict Resolution. We have 
distributed the survey and are now in the process of collating them. 

The Machon Library is woefully inadequate for current instructional needs. Additional books for the 
library are both a staff and school council goal. Biographies, social studies and science books will represent 
the phonty purchases. Plans for additional purchases are underway utilizing both PTA funds and the school 
budget. Our school librarian has culled the selection and we have decided to dedicate the monies raised from 
our Summer-Read-a-Thon and our last book fair to replacement books. 
KEY POINTS OF SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN 
The Machon School Improvement Plan focuses on six primary goals: 
Curricular 

• Reading instruction - review and adapt current reading instruction to better meet the needs of 
Machon students. 

• Expand reading instruction time 

• Expand the selection of books in the Machon Library 

• Use of technology to improfe skills 

• MCAS Improvement 
General 

• Improve/enhance community involvement at Machon 
CURRICULUM & STAFF INVOLVEMENT : As mentioned earlier, Reading instruction will be addressed both 
through faculty meetings and ongoing discussions. The staff will view F>A.T. City, a videotape presentation 
focusing on teaching strategies for learning disabled students. Mchon School purchased three new 
multimedia computers. The staff will be introduced to the potential of this hardware. As new software arrives, 
staff will review each and discuss how to implement into existing curriculum. Ongoing staff discussions 
regarding the tenets of the book, 'The skillful Teacher," will occur throughout the school year. 

Machon staff participated in many professional development opportunities offered by the system. Staff 
are also attending commercial conferences on a host of topics ranging from dealing with difficult students to 
the use of graphic organizers throughout the curricula. As mentioned earlier, Machon staff have participated in 
'Project Read' training. Additionally, Machon staff will participate in a study group that will attempt to 
familiarize them with Network Administrator, a computer lab management software. All staff will also 
participate in discipline/restraint training. 
STUDENT PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES 

• The Machon Student Council is a vibrant and enthusiastic group of involved students. Thus 



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far the SCA has hosted two bake sales and is working a school-wide time capsule 

• Machon's 'Before School Program' offers parents and children alternatives to day-care. This 
year the Machon School initiated a School Breakfast Program. Thus far, the program's 
success is heartening. 

• Machon children and staff communicate student progress and classroom initiatives with the 
monthly newsletter, 'The Machon Messenger." 



• Many Machon students participated in a summer long Reading Olympics. Collectively, 
students read almost 2000 hours and raised more than $2,000 for the school. Due to their 
efforts, the school received a 27" tv monitor, a VCR, a t.v. cart and a computer. 
PTA ACTIVITIES 

• The Machon PTA is an active and supportive arm of the school. This year the PTA offers many 
enrichment programs to the Machon students. In fact, this year the Machon PTA has increased their 
allotments for cultural/enrichment programs by three-fold. A total of $3,000 will be earmarked for 
these enrichment programs. 

• In addition to these areas the PTA holds computer classes, art classes, dance classes, a basketball 
program, 'pizza and movie nights,' book fairs, 'Haunted Halloween Fest,' gift wrap sales, and a gift of 
$100 to each class to help defer the cost of field trips. 

STANLEY SCHOOL 

The Stanley School opened on August 7, 2001 with 309 students enrolled in 16 classrooms in Grades K-5. 
School Theme The school theme through 6/01 was "The ABC's of Stanley - Accept, Be Kind - Care" 
and for 2001-2002 was "Learning and Caring Count at Stanley." Students continued to commit random acts of 
kindness and many other organized community service activities were planned. Grades K-5 participated in the 
annual St. Jude Hospital Math-A-Thon and in 3/01 raised $4640 with $5969 in 3/02. Each student completed 
a Math Fun Book with grade level appropriate problems and collected pledges from sponsors. Students in Gr 
1-5 were proud to know they were helping other children. Participation in an activity such as this is a unique 
opportunity to bolster a young child's self esteem while helping others. Grade 5 Leaders run a successful 
Recycling Program and collected over $1600 for TLC. They meet weekly with the principal to work on 
developing leadership skills, responsible behavior and exemplify belief that Taking One Small Action Can 
Make a Difference. Students collected $2300 for the Red Cross and the Fireman's disaster Relief Fund. 
Linens for local shelters were collected. Gr 5 Leaders raised $200 to purchase gift certificates for the 
Swampscott Senior Center Holiday Party; Gr 1 students conducted an annual canned food drive for the 
homeless. Gr 5 students raised $200 to purchase gift certificates to Johnnie's Foodmaster for senior citizens. 
Gr 3 students continued to work on and raise funds for the Penny Bear Project and they also collected 
hundreds of books for the Reach Out and Read Program at the Lynn Community Health Center. Other grades 
will be involved in projects throughout the year. Gr 5 Leaders continue to act as role models who demonstrate 
leadership and service. 

New Special Education Program The Social Skills Learning Center was created at the Stanley and 
Hadley Schools so that we would be able to meet the academic and social/emotional needs of students who 
are on the Autism spectrum. Five students received the services provided through this program in 2001-2002 
and four additional students will be enrolled in August 2002. 

Stanley School Council . The Council meets monthly to assess the needs of the school community 
and to establish a plan of action for school improvement. The School Council developed a Needs Assessment 
and a Plan for School Improvement for 2001-2002 which included the following: to utilize technological tools in 
order to enhance teacher effectiveness and learning for each student; to utilize a vahety of instructional 
strategies to address the needs of students so that each may achieve his/her potential; to upgrade, maintain 
and repair the school in order to maximize usable space in a facility which is a safe, clean and pleasant 
working environment; to provide resources and support; to shape and define the Stanley School culture. We 
continue to work toward these identified long-term goals. Another Needs Assessment was conducted in the 
Spring of 2002 nd a new Plan for School Improvement is being developed. 

The following programs were initiated during the 2001-2002 year in an effort to support the goals in our 
Plan for School Improvement: Chairs for Stanley (refurbishing chairs by families). SPIRIT (Stanley Parents 
Inspire, Reinforce, Teach). This program was begun to organize parent volunteers for various activities. 

Special Programs - Continental Math League Gr . 2, 3, 4, 5; Newspaper Club Gr. 3, 4, 5; Current Events 



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Club will begin in the Fall of 2002; Homework Club. 

Technology Update . We have a state-of-the-art computer lab with 24 iMac's networked. There is also 
internet access from 16 classrooms, the library and the office. The PTA has purchased four additional iMac's 
for the Lab. The Plan reguires "long term" financial support in order to upgrade and maintain the eguipment. 

Grant Funded programs which enhance the educational experience. Parent Involvement Project (PIP) 
Grant through DOE provides training and support for parental involvement in schools to enhance Math and 
Science programs. Johnnie's Foodmaster and PIP sponsored a K-3 Family Math and Science Night in 4/01 
and 4/02. Eisenhower funds provided professional development in the areas of math and science. 
Professional development was provided for staff in grades K-5 so that Science and Technology Kit materials 
could be utilized for implementation of the Science curriculum which was completed in the Summer of 2002. 
Math consultants have provided staff development opportunities for K-2 staff. Grade 5 teachers participated in 
the town-wide Salmon Project. 

Curhculum and Staff Development Programs . Teachers have been involved in various professional 
development activities. Gr 3-5 teachers were trained in Project READ. Science curriculum has been revised 
and an inquiry-based science program has been adopted which meets the National Science Foundation 
Standards and Massachusetts Framework goals. Staff members are encouaraged to participate in 
workshops and conferences held in and out of the district. 

Student Programs and Activities . Johnnie's Foodmaster K-3 Family Math and Science Night, Curriculum 
Night, Bring Your Parents Back to School Night and Book Fair, Orientation Programs for Incoming K Students 
and Parents, Geography Bee, Spelling Bee, DARE Graduation, Ranger Day Gr 5, Portfolio Sharing for Parents 
gr 1 -2, Various author's teas. Battle of the Books, Gr 4 and 5 mile Run, Duck Tour 2001 , Mimi Fest 2001 , 
Sounds a Little Fishy - Gr 2 - 2002, Gr 4 Showcase of Homes - Electricity Kit - final project. Memorial Day 
Program 2001 and 2002, Student Recognition Program 2001 and 2002, Reading Rally Gr 3-4, Gr 1 Pancake 
Breakfast, Gr 1 Celebrates Thanksgiving, Field trips to Town Hall, Pioneer Village, Freedom trail. Aquarium, 
Music Dept. concerts, Gr 3 Photography Exhibit, In-Schoolfield trips. Earth Wish week of activity. 

Grade Five Leaders' Club Activities . Gr 5 Leaders place flags on veterans' graves for Memorial Day, 
Recycling Program, Fund Raising forTLC, Volunteer Appreciation Tea, Open House Greeters/Bak Sale, Fund 
Raiser for Sw Senior Citizens 

PTA Activities. Pot Luck Dinner and Talent Show 3/02, Book Fair 11/01, Auction-Playground Fundraiser 
3/02, Holiday Fair 12/01, Annual Carnival 6/01, Clothing/Linen Dhve, Grounds Beautification Program, After- 
School enrichment Program, Walk-a-Thon. 

Cultural Arts/Enrichment Programs. Native American Perspectives - Gr 3, Art appreciation Gr 1-5, Littlest 
Acorn - K, Hi Touch Hi Tech - Gr 2, Madame Cune, K-5, Clara Barton K-5, Hellen Keller K-5, Jill Stover Gr 1 , 
Black History Month - Bamidele Dancers, Science Discovery Museum Gr4-5. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

The Dept. of Special Services underwent a change during the past 18 months including that of a change in 
title. Previously the office was called Pupil Personnel Services. To clarify the title further the School 
Committee changed the name to that of the Department of Special Services. The role of the department 
remains the same. The department provides ancillary and support services to students within the Swampscott 
Public School System. These services include special education, screening, and English as a Second 
Language. 

Special Education . In 2/01 the Special Services Department saw a change in leadership. 
Ms. Deborah Dixson accepted a position in a community closer to her home. Mona Blumstein, Team 
Chairperson, served as Interim Director through 6/02. Following a search, Ms. Maureen Dart Szymczak was 
appointed the new Director of Special Services for the district. 

Changes were also seen at the state level. The 10/1 report was replaced by a Student Information 
Management System (SIMS) report. The 12/1 report remained the same. Per the 12/1/01 headcount, there 
are 373 resident students in Swampscott who receive some form of special education services. This 
represents 15.5% of all Swampscott students (2406) and 13.9% of the school age population (K-12) attending 
schools in the Swampscott School System (322). These numbers reflect a decrease of 12 students from the 
previous year's 12/1 headcount (385). Swampscott's percentage of special needs students remains below the 
state average. 

There is an array of programs and sen/ices available to Swampscott students with special needs. Most of 
the special needs students receive their instruction in the mainstream general education program. This is 
accomplished by providing support services within the regular classroom through the use of supplementary 



179 



aides and services. Frequently, special educators and education support professionals provide direct support 
services in the regular education classroom. Many other students have their needs met through 
accommodations and modifications of the general curriculum and/or environment. Other students attend a 
resource room which is available in all schools. In the resource room the students receive direct and 
specialized instruction in a special education setting. Such services can include specialized reading, language 
arts, and/or math instruction, organizational support, study skills, speech therapy, occupational therapy, 
physical therapy or other needed support services requiring specialized instruction outside of the classroom. 

The Swampscott School System also has several Learning Center programs. There are district learning 
center programs located from the elementary through the high school levels that meet the identified needs of 
students who require a more substantive amount of their instruction within a special education setting. 
Students are mainstreamed as appropriate for identified academics as well as for art, music, physical 
education, library and computer services. 

The Life Skills Class at the high school is expanding. This year a new school store opened that was 
developed through the award of a SUCCESS grant. Students within the Life Skills class receive functional 
academics, vocational training and experiences, and practical life skills education. Students are 
mainstreamed into academic classes and electives as appropriate. 

In addition, the Swampscott Public Schools is pleased to support an integrated preschool program. This 
program is located at SHS and provides direct support services to students ages three to five. Typical peers 
are welcomed into the integrated preschool program. 

New Programs. A new program began at SHS in 9/02. Within this Language Based Learning Center 
Program, a special education teacher, an educational support professional and a part time speech and 
language pathologist provide direct educational support services to identified students. Two other new 
programs were begun this year at the Hadley and Stanley elementary schools. The Communication and 
Social Skills Programs have been designed to serve students identified with autism spectrum disorders. 
Students are mainstreamed to the greatest extent possible based on their lEP's. Such services with an 
inclusion specialist and consultation with psychologists through The Academy have enabled the school system 
to retain students within the district In addition, for the first time, the school system accepted a tuitioned-in 
student from another district who required the support services from this new program. 

At present, 29 students or 1.2% of the total school population are placed in programs outside district as the 
nature of their special needs warrants more specialized programming than is available within the system. The 
total of 29 students represents a drop of three students requiring out of district placements. Most of these 
students are children with multiple handicaps, serious emotional/behavioral disturbances, brain injury and 
severe autism. 

Swampscott is keeping pace with the state and national trend of serving more students with more 
significant disabilities. Although most of these students' needs could conceivably be met within the local 
school district, barriers exist that prevent the local development of such programs. The greatest barner at 
present is the lack of space available for program development within our school buildings. 

As noted in last year's Annual Report the year 2000 brought about significant change to state laws 
governing special education. 603CMR28.00 is now the special education law of Massachusetts, replacing 
Chapter 766. Many of the changes in the law were established in response to federal special education 
requirements and standards which were changed in 1997. In 9/00 more than 50 additional changes to special 
education law were added by the legislature through outside sections to the FY01 budget. 

The 1 997 reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Act focused on four main areas; (1 ) 
strengthening parental participation in the educational process, (2) accountability for students' participation 
and success in the general education curriculum and mastery of lEP goals/objectives, (3) remediation and 
disciplinary actions addressing behavior problems at school and in the classroom and (4) responding to the 
needs of a more diverse society. 

Some of the highlights of the MA changes are as follows: A new lEP form has been adopted and 
implemented. The new lEP is a standards-based document which requires greater input from parents and 
alignment with the MA Curriculum Frameworks. All mandated forms used in the special education process 
have been changed. 

• Eligibility for special education has been more clearly defined. For the first time in MA, students must 
be identified with a specific disability in order to be eligible for special education. The disability 
categories include autism, developmental delay, intellectual, sensory; hearing, vision ordef-blind, 
neurological, emotional, communication, physical, specific learning disability or health. The categories 
are the same as the federal definitions for disabilities. The disability must be causal to the lack of 



180 



effective school progress. Lastly, as a result of the disability, the student must require specialized 
instruction not otherwise available within the general education classroom. 

• A sliding fee scale has been established for parents who seek public funding for independent 
educational evaluation. 

• There is a change in the NMA standard from "maximum possible development " to "free and 
appropriate public education" reflecting federal language. This particular change went into effect on 
1/1/02. 

• The law now requires the district to develop a "Curriculum Accommodation Plan" (CAP) in an effort to 
ensure that all efforts have been made to meet students' needs within the general educational 
environment. 

• The law mandates that no child be exempt from assessment programs. The Alternate Assessment for 
MCAS has been designed at the state level and is in use again this year. The alternate assessment is 
based on the curriculum frameworks and is a portfolio assessment with student work. 

Teachers and administrators in the Swampscott School System continue to be supportive of the inclusion 
of children with special needs in the school and the classrooms. Many general educational and special 
education teachers have accessed training opportunities to enhance their skills in working with diverse 
populations of students. Throughout 2001 , ongoing training efforts in Autism/PPD were expanded and 
provided to a variety of staff across the system as this population continues to increase locally. Additional 
training has been provided in Alternate Assessment, specialized reading approaches (Project READ), 
Legal Issues in Special Education, Occupational Therapy issues, behavior management, discipline, 
functional behavior assessments and manifestation of disability requirements, WISC III and signing to 
name a few. 

In May, 2002, the Swampscott Public School system underwent a Coordinated Program Review from 
the Department of Education. This is a periodic review required by the state and federal government. The 
review included Special Education, Title I, Safe and Drug Free Schools Grant, English as a Second 
Language and Civil Rights. Five DOE employees vksited our schools for eight days. They observed our 
programs, reviewed records and interviewed teachers, parents, educational support professionals, speech 
and language therapists, occupational and physical therapists, school psychologists and administrators. 

The Swampscott Public School system was awarded an Assistive Technology Grant in 2001. A 
Swampscott AssistiveTechnology team of educators was formed who attended state funded training on 
assistive technology at U Mass for the 2001-2002 school year. 

For fiscal year 2001 the Special Education Dept. applied for and received four noncompetitive grant 
allocations to support efforts on behalf of special needs students. These grant allocations are for the sole 
purpose of supplementing the local budget, not supplanting it. 

Early Childhood Special Education Allocation Grant $ 18,978 

IDEA - Special Education Entitlement $288,545 

SPED Professional Development $ 24,486 

English as a Second Language $18,750 
Screening . Screening is required by law for all children entering kindergarten. This is a brief assessment 
of developmental skills. The process is used to identify the possible presence of special needs. Areas 
screened include articulation, language, auditory perception, visual perception, vision and hearing acuity, 
fine motor, gross motor and visual motor. Students who do not perform well on the screening may be 
referred for a special education evaluation. For K 2001, 160 children were screened. 

According to special education laws, early childhood screening is available to three and four year old 
children whose parents suspect the presence of a special need in any of the areas listed above. Any 
parents who wish to have their child screened should contact the Special Services Office for an 
appointment. 

Parents and other members of the Swampscott community are encouraged to contact the Special 
Services Office for additional information regarding special education laws, Swampscott's programs in 
special education or ESL, or any other matter pertaining to Special Services. 

GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT 

At the beginning of the 2001-2002 school year, the Guidance Department saw the addition of 
Mr. Thomas Healey who was hired as a school adjustment counselor. The rest of the department consists of 
Mrs. Pressler, Mrs. Reardon and Mr. Solazzo, who are guidance counselors; and Mrs. York who is the 



181 



secretary This year the guidance team served 755 students. To augment the guidance staff, a counselor 
intern was present two days a week for the entire year. 

During September and October the counselors were phmanly involved with resolving scheduling 
conflicts, student counseling, preparation for the 170 colleges represented at the College Fair, distribution of 
the Student 504 Accommodation Plans and supervision of the SAT and PSAT for three Saturdays. 

During November and December the Guidance Department processed all the early decision and early 
action applications as well as the vast majonty of applications that had an early January deadline. 
Approximately 20 college admission counselors visited with students and discussed the admission process. 
The department hosted a financial aid seminar. MCAS retest was given and the ASVAB military test was 
administered. The Freshman Experience saw a record number of underclassmen attend. 

January and February was the time to complete the college application process, counsel student and 
to coordinate visits from local military recruiters. During this time the department and a few faculty members 
coordinated and hosted a breakfast for 80 students and 30 employers to mark National Job Shadow Day 
Initiative. 

March and April was a time to gear up for scheduling and course selection. All underclassmen were 
personally seen and advised regarding future schedule options. The MCAS Long Composition was scheduled 
for all 216 tenth grade students. The department initiated the First Annual College Parents' Night. This event 
focused on what the eleventh graders and their parents should do to prepare for college. 

The final two months of the year brought with them the main MCAS testing period, SAT and AP 
testing, and college counseling with juniors. This is also a time to verify grades and to complete summer 
school lists and promotion lists. 

Throughout the school year, in addition to the aforementioned activities, the Guidance Department 
was actively involved in seeing students and dealing with the many issues that occur each day in the lives of 
our student body . 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Health 

The Health Department of the Swampscott Public Schools provides students with a comprehensive 
K-12 Health Curriculum taught by health educators, physical educators and school nurses. At the elementary 
level, the students receive health education on a biweekly basis. The health educator presents the lessons 
and occasionally team teaches with the school nurses. On the middle school level students receive Health 
Education as part of a specialist rotation of 18 days. At the high school level freshman and sophomore 
students are required to take one semester of health education. An integrated Lifetime Health and Fitness 
Course is required during either the junior or senior year. 

The Health Education Department actively pursues and receives grant support through state and 
federal grant programs. These grant programs are developed and administered under the direction of the 
Swampscott Health Advisory Board. The Board consists of a group of school, student ,and community 
members who meet, discuss and determine the focus of grant funded programs. The Health Advisory Board 
has met and discussed the results of the 2001 YRBS. This is vital information that will be used to determine 
the focus of health education for future programming. 

The school nurses are excellent resources who provide services to students and staff. The nurses 
conduct vision, hearing and scoliosis screenings, immunizations, medical records, referrals, team meetings 
and provide direct medical services to students and staff. They are valued members of our program. 

Special Programs At the elementary level : guest speakers have presented material for staff during 
professional development days. Toys for Local Children Collection; 91 1 Relief Fund, Linen Drive for Shelters; 
100 Kitchen Items for Charity, Blanket and Mitten Drive, Holiday Visit to the Bertram House, Math-a-thon for 
St. Jude's Research Hospital, Jump-a-thon for Cystic Fibrosis, Michigan Model and Growing Health 
Curriculum 

At the middle school level: Bake Sale for 91 1 Relief Fund, Guess the Pumpkin Weight for 91 1 Relief 
Fund, HAWK Representative discussed violence/bullying. Three Week Unit on Kindness, School Resource 
Officer - Fatal vision Unit, Smoke-Out Day Activities, THTM Health Curriculum 

At the high school level: Prevention Center, Peer Leader Groups, DARE/Peer Leaders spoke with 
grade 5 s5udents re drugs and substance abuse. Clothing Drive, Self Esteem Day for Middle School Students, 
Fund Raiser for Family Affected by 91 1 , Community Poster - Strong Men Don't Bully, SADD - every other 
year simulated car crash during prom season, THTM Health Curriculum 
Physical Education 

At the beginning of the 2001-2002 school year, the Physical Education Department experienced the 



182 



following changes: the combined departments of Physical Education/Health was split to employ a Curriculum 
Director for each department. Ms, Holly Brennan was appointed Health Coordinator (K-12) while Mr. William 
Bush was appointed Physical Education Coordinator (K-12). Mr. Francis DeFelice retired as middle school 
physical education and was replaced by Mr. David Gagnon. 

The Physical Education programs of the Swampscott Public Schools provide students with a 
comprehensive physical education curriculum taught by our eight physical education educators At the 
elementary level, students receive physical education instruction twice a week. At the middle school level, 
students receive ninety hours of instruction including an adventure based activity physical education course. 
During their freshman high school years, freshmen and sophomore students are required to take physical 
education each year every other day. An integrated Lifetime Health and Fitness course is required during their 
junior or senior years. Our department was unable to offer the upper class elective course. Sports and Fitness 
due to lack of staffing. The Physical Education Department was also able to work with community 
organizations and the Recreation Department to sponsor a vanety of Intramural/Xtreme activities including 
Middle School Friday Night D A. R E. Basketball, Elementary Basketball League, High School Basketball/Ping 
Pong Leagues, and Field Days for both the middle and elementary schools. 

At hletics The Athletic Department coordinated 23 varsity athletic teams as well as 17 sub-varsity and 
freshmen teams at Swampscott High School this year. We also have a combined Marblehead/Swampscott 
Varsity Wrestling Team. This year we started a Girls' Lacrosse Club Team and now have a JV Basketball 
cheering Team. Currently, we are working to have a combined Gymnastics Team with Marblehead. 

Our Swimming Team was the NEC champions and nine of the varsity teams qualified for State 
Tournament play. We had two MVP's (golf and swimming) and 40 All-Star Athletes this year. 

The Middle School Athletic Program includes Co-ed Soccer, Co-ed Cross Country, Field Hockey, 
Boys' and Girls' Basketball, Ice Hockey, Boys' and Girls' outdoor Track & Field and Softball. 

Many of our coaches and athletes received special recognition. We had two Coach of the Year 
Awards in Boys' Basketball and Co-ed Swimming and an Assistant Coach of the Year in Football. Many of our 
athletes received awards such as "Lynn Item" All-Star, "Salem Evening News" All-Star, "Boston Globe" All- 
Star, "Boston Herald" All-Star, "Lynn Item" Gold Helmet Award, Moynihan Lumber Award, "Salem News" 
Student-Athlete of the Year, " Boston Globe" All-Scholastic Award. In football, Kyle Beatrice broke the state 
record for touch down passes. 

The Athletic Department sponsored a cook-out for all of its athletes and parents to begin the school 
year. All rules, regulations and expectations were reviewed at that time. 

SWAMPSCOTT BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS ANNUAL REPORT 

All Buildings : All outside doors were changed. 

High School New ceilings were installed in the first and second floors of the Shaw Wing. Approximately 100 
new energy efficient fixtures were installed and arrangements made with Mass Electric to pay a portion of the 
cost. Changing over from oil to gas was completed and old oil tanks were removed. Two, 250 gallon oil tanks 
were installed for use in an emergency. The generator was converted to dual function so that it can be run on 
natural gas or propane. A new telephone system was installed at a cost of $200,000. A new security system 
was installed with cameras monitoring entrances, hallways, etc. Internet connections were completed. All 
urinals were snaked out eliminating hallway flooding. Univents andf exhaust fans are examined every two to 
three months. Computer room was air conditioned and new shades were installed. 

Middle School. The main project for this year was the pointing up of the building. This will prevent flooding, 
water damage and eliminate patching which had to be done whenever heavy rains were encountered. All 
windows in the building were adjusted so that they operate well. Opaque panes were replaced. A successful 
search was finally accomplished and used sections for the large boiler were found. The compressor motor 
was replaced on the large boiler These 50 year old boilers should be replaced. A new phone system is in 
process of being installed. Internet connections have been installed in all classrooms. Univents are constantly 
monitored, but due to the age of the equipment, need constant repair. Two ceilings were installed in the 
classroom in the basement and new fixtures and sprinklers were dropped below the ceiling. 
Clarke School . Outside doors have been replaced. The School Department is in the process of revamping 
and replacing a section of the boiler. Lighting has been upgraded. 

Hadley School. A new roof was installed in the annex. Existing covers on the air shafts on the mam building 
are to be removed and replaced with exhaust fans. Every classroom will have Its own exhaust register. This 
will enhance air quality in the building. HVAC have been installed to replace radiators. Three classrooms in 



183 



the annex had ceilings dropped and new lights installed. Four 90 year old univents are being replaced in the 
annex. 

Machon School . The major project this year was the conversion to gas heat. The burners were replaced, oil 

tank removed and repiping of the heating system accomplished. 
\ Stanley School. New rubber roof was installed on flat portions of the building. A new ceiling was installed in 

\ part of the library. Library auditorium was repainted. A grant from DOE funded 200 new light fixtures in the 

1 building. Fifty energy saving ballasts were installed. Ninety-eight percent of all lighting fixtures were replaced 

2 or had energy saving ballasts installed. Three fans were installed in the library to push heat from ceiling down 
^ on the floor as an energy saving measure. The Internet is up and running. All shut-off s on urinals were 

.■' replaced. Conversion of the boiler to gas was completed and gas tanks removed. A program was begun to 

^- replace all thermostats in the steam traps. New low water cut-offs were installed to bring boilers up to code 

5 Automatic water feeds were installed on the boilers. 

I 



184 



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TRAFFIC STUDY COMMITTEE 



During the eighteen-month period from January 1, 2001 through June 30, 2002, the 
Traffic Study Committee met a total of seventeen (17) times. Five (5) of those meetings were in 
conjunction with the Earth Removal Advisory Committee. 

The Traffic Study Committee meetings and discussions dealt with reviewing requests, 
complaints and concerns of residents in all aspects. The residents' concerns were addressed 
and acted upon by the committee or referred to the appropriate department for action. 

All residents with problems and/or concerns were contacted directly either by a 
committee member or in writing and informed of relevant decisions made by the committee. 

All matters were settled with the public's safety as a primary concern. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Sid Novak, Chair 

Sgt. John Behen, Traffic Safety Officer 

Sylvio Baruzzi, Superintendent Board of Public Works 

Louise LaConte 

Jeremiah Murphy 



186 



OFFICE OF VETERANS' SERVICES 



The Office of Veterans Services is mandated under Massachusetts General Law Chapter 
115 and is designed to assist veterans and their families in receiving any and all benefits that may 
be accorded them, either through the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Veterans' 
Services, the United States Veterans' Administration, the Social Security Administration or any 
other Department or Organization that is designed to assist the veteran or their family All 
financial aid disbursements from this office to needy veterans are subject to a 75% 
reimbursement from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts To date, the reimbursement rate 
from the Commonwealth is 100%. The request for assistance with Military Honors at a veteran's 
funeral is rapidly becoming the most requested benefit for the families of deceased veterans. 
Federal Law has mandated that individuals receive the proper Military Honors from the veteran's 
respective branch of the U.S. Military at his or her interment. However, the participation from the 
U.S. Military has been somewhat less than 100% since September 1l"^ To honor the request for 
proper Military Rituals by the veterans family at the veterans funeral, this office works with the 
U S. Military, local Veteran Organizations and Funeral Homes, who are also well prepared to 
support these requests, to ensure that the veterans and the families last wishes are realized. 

VETERANS AFFAIRS COMMITTEE 

The Veterans Affairs Committee serves to keep the veteran and his deeds at a 
heightened state of awareness within the community. The committee consists of Mr. Jim Schultz, 
Chair, Mr John Stinson, Mr. Mike Pizzi, Mr. John Sacherski, Mr Steve DeFelice. Mr. John 
DiPietro, and Mr. William Wollerschied all representing the American Legion, the Veterans of 
Foreign Wars or the Marine Corps League. In May 2001, we held our annual Armed 
Forces/Memorial Day parade with hundreds of participants including all area Police Departments, 
Color Guards from all branches of the Military a U.S. Army band and the 2"'^ Marine Division Band 
to name a few. The parade was a great success but will probably be remembered more for the 
"sinking helicopter". An H-53 Sea Stallion, the largest helicopter in the United States Military 
came to Swampscott for a static display and landed at Phillips Park. Unfortunately, the unstable 
ground beneath the landing was unable to support the weight of such a large craft and eventually 
sank into the ground. A large effort to dig the helicopter out was undertaken and it was eventually 
pulled out but not until the other landing gear also sank into the ground. A concerted effort by the 
crew of the helicopter, the Swampscott Fire and Police Departments, the Swampscott DPW, and 
civilian entities made the recovery a success. When news of the mired helicopter and the 
successful recovery reached the Admiral, who's command included that helicopter, he allegedly 
marveled at the Towns ability to work together to solve the problem and reach a successful 
solution. Letters of Commendation were sent out to the individuals who assisted in this effort 
from the Helicopter Squadrons Commanding Officer. This year as you know the Town celebrated 
its 150'^ Anniversary, as such the Veterans Affairs Committee worked with the 150"^ Anniversary 
Committee to put on a parade to be remembered. The committee assisted with planning, 
organizing and staging the parade Finally, this year the Committee is planning to dedicate a new 
Vietnam Veterans Monument The dedication is scheduled for Veterans Day 11 November 2002 
immediately following the Veterans Day Observance and will be held just West of the Flagpole on 
the median of Monument Avenue all are encouraged to attend 

MEMORIAL DAY 

Two weeks pnor to Memonal Day volunteers from the 5'^ grade class at Stanley School 
under the direction of their Principal MS. Caria Guarnieri, and the local Boy Scout Troop placed 
approximately 1000 U S marker flags were on the graves of the veterans interred at Swampscott 
Cemetery The cemetery supenntendent, Mr. Robert Vernava, was on hand to oversee the 
placing of the flags, which is a very extensive and tedious task. We thank both groups and the 
individuals who come on an annual basis to assist in this endeavor, your commitment to our 
veterans is past and present is greatly appreciated and heartwarming. On Memorial Day the first 
event was a Mass held at St. John's the Baptist Church followed by a wreath laying at the 



187 



f 



flagpole overlooking the harbor in the lot of St. Johns to honor all the veterans who were lost at 
sea. Following that ceremony the Towns ceremony was conducted at the Swampscott Cemetery 
At 12:00 members of the Swampscott Police Department raised the flag to Full Staff and the 
ceremony commenced Color Guards from the American Legion, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, 
! the Manne Corps League and the Swampscott Police Department participated in the event. The 

i service was officiated by the Reverend Louise Mann of the Church of the Holy Name and was 

3 attended by several members of the Board of Selectmen as well as other Town officials and 

I many Town residents A rifle salute was performed, taps was sounded and the bagpipes 

3 concluded the ceremony. A very poignant day with the effects of September still in 

] everyone's mind and members of our Armed Forces actively engaged in a war overseas. 

VETERANS DAY 

?; 

^1 Following the tradition, on the day of the 11'" Month at 11:00, members of the 

ji American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Marine Corps League and the Swampscott Police 

ri Department marched in and formed at Thompson Circle on Monument Avenue to perform a 

ceremony which honors our men and women both past and present who have worn the uniform 
and made the sacrifices that needed to be made to ensure that this country remains free and 
strong. The turn out for this particular event was very high as the effects of the September 1l'" 
attack on the United States was still very fresh in everyone's mind. Reverend Dean Pedersen of 
the First Church Swampscott officiated. We honored and prayed for our servicemen and women 
who are currently serving in harms way in a war against terrorism. A rifle salute was fired, taps 
were sounded and a rendition of amazing grace was performed on the 
Bagpipes to conclude the ceremony. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Jim Schultz 

Veterans Service Officer, 
Chairman, Veterans Affairs Cmte. 



188 



SWAMPSCOTT WAR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Trustees 
Joseph J. Balsama, Chairman 
Eileen Ventresca, Secretary 
Thomas B. White, Jr., James H. Lilly 
Ida S. Pinto, Hugh (Jim) Schultz 
Angelo Losano, Jean F. Reardon, 
Paul E. Garland 

General Information 

A $10,000 scholarship fund was established by vote of Town Meeting on March 28, 1950, as 
perpetual memorial to those who served in the Military Service defending our freedom. The first 
scholarship was awarded in 1951 for $250. In 1964, the Town Meeting appropriated an additional 
$10,000. Since that time, gifts have been received from numerous individuals and organizations in 
memory of loved relatives and friends. To date 257 Swampscott High School students have been award 
scholarships totaling $91,050. 

Change In Personnel 

In June of 2001, Robert F. Donelan, who had been a trustee since 1997, retired. The remaining 
trustees wish to thank him for his years of dedicated service. 

Details of changes In the fund balance 

Balance 12/31/00 $113,683.00 
2001 donations 1,245.00 
Interest 5,097.06 



TOTAL $120,025.06 

2001 Scholarship Awards 4,400.00 
Balance 12/31/01 $115,625.06 

2002 donations 1/1 - 6/30 500.00 
Interest 1/1 - 6/30 2,196.55 



TOTAL $118,321.06 
Bank Adjustment 4,352.98 



Balance 6/30/02 $122,674.04 

Eight Scholarships Totaling $4,400 were awarded in July 2001 as follows: 

$700 Lindsay Dwyer (Ernest Manchin Memorial Scholarship) Williams College 

$700 Michael Philip Short M.l.T. 

$500 Michelle Bernstein Hampshire College 

$500 Emily Derr Cornell 

$500 Rebecca L. Brandt Maine College of Art 

$500 Ashley Atkin George Washington University 

$500 Carly Soiref University of Wisconsin 

$500 Tara Bartlett University of Massachusetts 



189 



The trustees wish to thank everyone, who made donations to the Swampscott War Memorial 
Scholarship Fund. Through your generosity, we are able to build up equity in the fund, thereby providing 
the opportunity for additional income from which the awards are granted. Each year a few Swampscott 
Highs school graduates, who continue on to higher education, will receive some financial assistance. 

I Honor Roll of Current Donors (January 2001 to June 30, 2002) 

^ Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Balsama, Sylvia Drais, Debby DuBay, Natalie Leuzzi, Mr. & Mrs. Angelo M, 

^ Losano, Pam Manchin MacDonald, Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Manchin, Mary Lutz, Mr. & Mrs. Robert Pierro, Ida S. 

^ Pinto, Pinto Insurance Agency, Joseph Pinto, Josephine Redford, Mr. & Mrs. John Silvestro, and 

^ Wayfarers Lodge A.F. & A.M. 

h In 2001 Donations were made In memory of: 

I 

^ Margaret (Peg) Antonucci, Rev. William J. Burns, William F. Connell, Lawrence R. Corcoran, 

Lawrence Cuneo, Nicholas Demchek, Mollis E. Durgin, Robert P. Doherty, Thomas Doucette, Charles W. 
Dwyer, Sidney W. Farrell, Mary V. Geier, Mary Hallion, Frederick H. Hart, Eric A. Holmgren, Edward Hooper, 
Mary Indorato, Catherine M. Ippolito, Barney Kahn, David Lampros, Nancy Macaluso, Ronald J. Madigan, 
Jr. Ernest Manchin, Mary Manchin, Joseph A. Mazzola, Charles F. McCain, Frederick H. Nohelty, Sr. 
Minnie Pagnotta, Isabel Pazyra, Joseph (Sonny) Price, Charles L. Quarleno, Donald A. Ranger, Leo 
Rizzo, Mark Patrick Ryan, Bernard Schultz, Richard C. Sheehy, Martha D. Smedile, Emory C. Spencer, 
Charles A. Swanson, Mary Szoke, Paul Szoke, and Stanley J. Wydra. 

From January 1 to June 30, 2002, Donations were made in memory of: 

Kenneth C. Arnold, Jr. , Stanley Bondelevitch, Philip Dantzker, Marvin R. Finn, Bella F. Goldston, 
Norma Jean Gorman, David M. Kahn, Frederick W.H. Keller, Morris Hershenson, Leslie C. Hitchings, 
Anthony Linares, Ernest Manchin, Mary Manchin, Catherine McGreal, Richard H. Olson, Daniel Arthur 
Riley, Harley Rothwell, and Lawrence G. Robertie. 

Honor Roll of Special Scholarships (Historical) 

Donations for "My Favorite Teacher Memorial" 

Louise C. Stanley (Stanley School was named for her) - From Ernest Manchin 

Alice Durgin - from Minnie Pagnotta 

Waldemar G. Kester - from Kimberly G. Sawin 
Priscilia Waldo Papin Memorial - from Christopher W. Ratley, scholarship recipient in 1965 
Two sisters Memorial - in memory of Eleanor M (Currie) Ludlam and Natalie Coraine, who were 
both veterans of World War II. All were graduates of Swampscott High School. 

Upper Swampscott Improvement Association Memorial 
Class of 1955 
Class of 1937 

Wayfarer Lodge of fVlasons Memorial - January 1, 2001 - June 30, 2002 donations are 
In memory of: Frederick H. Hart, Morris Hershenson, Edward M. Hooper, David Lampros, Richard H. 
Olson, Bernard A. Schultz, Emory C. Spencer, Charles Swanson, Stanley J. Wydra. 



190 



INSPECTOR OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



The Inspector of Weights and Measures, i.e. the Sealer, collected in fees for the Town of 
Swampscott $3,482.20 from the period January 2001 through June 30, 2002 
Of that amount $1,775.00 came from a scanner venfication-testing program instituted by the 
State for the first time. This is a bi-annual testing program 

The balance o f$1,707.20 was due to the testing of scales, weights, gasoline and oil 
dispensers, wire and cordage machines, etc. Both of these amounts, individually and in total are 
the highest amounts recorded by this office. 

One outstanding account lies open upon my departure. The amount of $75 remains 
unpaid for a scanning test at a store in the mall that went bankrupt. This amount appears to be 
un-collectable in spite of my effort to collect from the bankruptcy officials for the company. 

Lastly, I am retiring on July 1, 2002 I have served in this position for thirty-three years 
and have enjoyed it very much 

Thanks to all who made it a pleasant experience. 

Sincerely, 
John O'Hare 

The following is a breakdown of devices adjusted and sealed: 



Adjusted 



Sealed 



Scales & Balances 



100-1000lbs 
10-100lbs 
lOlbs or less 



14 
5 



1 

94 

7 



Weights 



Metric 

Apothecary Tray 



35 
28 

89 
130 
3 
2 



Scanners 
Gasoline Meters 

Oil-Grease 
Wire-Rope-Cordage 



2 



Totals 



21 



389 



191 



RETIRED 
1/1/01 TO 6/30/02 



Donald Babcock 




School Department 


Tom Maccarone 




School Department 


Carl W. Bates 




Fire Department 


Douglas Maitland 




School Department 


James Coffin 




School Department 


Corinne Nelson 




School Department 


Janet Cook 




School Department 


Tom Nelson 




School Department 


John J. Corcoran 




Police Department 


Catherine Rodden 




Police Department 


Clayton Curtis 




School Department 


Arlene Rosen 




School Department 


Hildegard Davis 




School Department 


Allen Shapiro 




School Department 


Frank DeFelice 




School Department 


Eleanor Smith 




School Department 


Eileen Dineen 




School Department 


Donald Streeter 




School Department 


John A. DiPietro 




Public Works 


Alan F. Taubert 


Department 


Public Works 




Department 


David Fraser 




Public Works 


John E. Toomey 


Department 


Police Department 


Elizabeth Gilbert 


Richard J. Wilson 


School Department 


Police Department 


Ann Greenbaum 


Catherine Woods 


School Department 


Town Hall 


Peter Juntunen 




School Department 




James Kalloch 




School Department 




Susan Kalloch 




School Department 




David F. Lynch 




Fire Department 





192 



SERVICE TO THE TOWN 



On behalf of the citizens of Swampscott, the Board of Selectmen express appreciation to the following 
people who gave service to the Town and who resigned 1/1/01 - 6/30/02 



Joseph MacDonald 
Carol Epstein 
Sheryl DiLisio 
Walter Newhall 
Ina Resnikoff 
Fran Golden 
Joseph Crimmins 
Joseph Sinatra 
Lawrence Mangini 

Michael Gambale 

Ellen Vinard 
Michael Bergman, MD 
Marilyn Margulius 
Paul Wermuth 
Gary Langdon 
John Toomey 
Jan O'Malley 
Kathleen Tucker 
Robert DiLisio 
Robert Jaeger 
Alan Taubert 
Edward Snyder 
Phillip Pelletier 
Geralyn Faico 
William Wolf 
Peter Beatrice, III 
Richard Feinberg 
Mersine Hennessey 
Robert Donelan 
John O'Hare 



Zoning Board of Appeals 
Conservation Commission 
Council on Aging 
Council on Aging 
Council on Aging 
Cultural Council 

Earth Removal Advisory Committee 

Board of Election Commissioners 

Harbor Advisory Committee 

Veterans' Affairs Committee 

Harbor Advisory Committee 

Assistant Harbormaster 

Board of Health 

Board of Health 

Historical Commission 

Trustees of the Public Library 

Personnel Board 

Police Chief 

Crossing Guard 

Crossing Guard 

Board of Public Works 

Board of Public Works 

Board of Public Works, Superintendent 

Recreation Commission 

Recreation Commission 

Mass. Bays Program Representative 

Retirement Board Administrator 

School Committee 

School Committee 

Traffic Committee 

War Memorial Scholarship Fund Committee 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 



I 



193 



IN MEMORIAM 



Mary Hallion 

Retired from: School Department 
Died: February 6, 2001 

Arnold Spediacci 

Retired from: Fire Department 
Died: March 6, 2001 



Marion Dwyer 

Retired from: School Department 
Died: November 11, 2001 

Carol McNelley 

Retired from: Assessors Office 
Died: December 31, 2001 



Miriam Dodge 

Retired from: School Department 
Died: March 20, 2001 

Cherles W. Dwyer 

Retired: Veterans' Agent 
Died: April 1, 2001 

Mary Morrill 

Retired from: School Department 
Died: April 24, 2001 

Eleanor Duane 

Retired from: School Department 
Died: July 14, 2001 

George Arrington 

Retired from: Department of Public Works 
Died: July 24, 2001 

Stanley Kuian 

Retired from: Department of Public Works 
Died: August 6, 2001 

Amy Burke Lambert 

Retired from: School Department 
Died: September 11, 2001 



Melba Collins 

Retired from: School Department 
Died: January 14, 2002 

Elizabeth Forbes 

Retired from: Library 
Died: February 5, 2002 

Karen Clain 

Retired from: School Department 
Died: March 5, 2002 

Stanley Bondelevitch 

Retired from: School Department 
Died: March 17, 2002 

Laurence Robertie 

Retired from: School Department 
Died: March 21, 2002 

John White 

Retired from: School Department 
Died: May 31, 2002 

Bella Goldston 

Retired from: School Department 
Died: June 18, 2002 



Helen Roger 

Retired from: School Department 
Died: September 20, 2001 

Esther Beckwith 

Retired from: School Department 
Died: September 22, 2001 

Lawrence R. Corcoran 

Retired from: Police Department 
Died: October 4, 2001 



Joseph Fiore 

Retired from: Department of Public Works 
Died: October 20, 2001 



Patricia Benecke 

Retired from: School Department 
Died: October 21, 2001 



194 



r 



FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 



EMERGENCY NUMBERS 


FOR cMbRCcNCIES ONLY 


911 




POLICE - Business 


781-595-1111 




FIRE - Business 


781-595-4050 


INFORMATION ABOUT: 


CALL: 




Assessments 


Assessors 


596-8858 


Benefits(Employee Insurance) 


Administrator 


596-9553 


Bicycle Licenses 


Police 


595-1111 


Bills & Accounts 


Tov\/n Accountant 


596-8811 


Birth Certificates 


Town Clerk 


596-8856 


Board of Appeals 


Secretary 


596-8858 


Building Permits 


Building Inspector 


596-8857 


Bunal Permits 


Health Department 


596-8864 


Cemetery 


Cemetery 


596-8863 


Checks 


Town Treasurer 


596-8852 


Conservation 


Commission 


596-7512 


Council on Aging 


Council on Aging 


596-8866 


Death Certificates 


Town Clerk 


596-8856 


Dog Licenses 


Town Clerk 


596-8856 


Dogs-Lost & Found 


Animal Control Officer 


595-1111 


Elections 


Commissioners 


596-8855 


Engineering 


Public Works 


596-8860 


Entertainment Licenses 


Selectmen 


596-8850 


Executive Secretary to the 


Executive Secretary 


596-8889 


Board of Selectmen 






Fire Permits 


Fire Department 


595-4050 


Gas Permits 


Building Department 


596-8857 


Housing Authority 


Executive Director 


593-5516 


Library 


Public Library 


596-8868 


Lights(Street) 


Selectmen 


596-8850 


Liquor Licenses 


Selectmen 


596-8850 


Marriage Certificates 


Town Clerk 


596-8856 


Milk Inspection 


Health Department 


596-8864 


Parking Tickets 


Commissioner 


978-970-1400 


Parks & Playgrounds 


Public Works 


596-8860 


Plumbing Permits 


Building Department 


596-8857 


Public Housing 


Housing Authority 


593-5516 


Recreation 


Commission 


596-8854 


Schools 


School Department 


596-8802 


Sewers & Streets 


Public Works 


596-8860 


Tax Collections 


Tax Collector 


596-8856 


Tennis Permits 


Recreation 


596-8854 


Trash/Recyclable Collection 


Health Department 


596-8864 


Trees 


Public Works 


596-8860 


UCC Filings 


Town Clerk 


596-8856 


Veterans Benefits 


Veteran's Services 


596-8853 


Voter Registration 


Election Office 


596-8855 


Water 


Public Works 


596-8860 


Weight & Measures 


Sellectmen(lnfo only) 


596-8850 


Winng Permits 


Building Department 


596-8857 


Workers' Compensation 


Administrator 


596-9553 


Yard Sale Permits 


Police 


595-1111 


Zoning 


Secretary 


596-8858 



195 



INDEX 



A 

Appointed by the Board of Health 

. Health Officer 10 

I Recycling Committee 10 

5 Appointed by the Board of Public Works 

5 Superintendent of Public Works & Town Engineer 11 

] Appointed by the Building Inspector 

I Gas & Plumbing Inspector 10 

Assistant Inspector 10 

:^ Appointed by the Contributory Retirement Board & Selectmen & 

I Elected by the Town Employees 

^ Contributory Retirement Board 11 

Si Appointed by the Mass. Emergency Response Commission 

Emergency Planning Committee 10 

Appointed by the Probate Court 

Roland Jackson Medical Scholarship Committee 10 

Appointed by the Selectmen 

Accountant 5 

Administrative Assistant 5 

Alternate Building Inspector 5 

Animal Control Officer 5 

Assistant Harbormasters 5 

Assistant Shellfish Constable 5 

Assistant Veterans' Agent 5 

Assistant Wire Inspectors 5 

Burial Agent 5 

Clerk/Collector/Treasurer 5 

Computer Analyst 5 

Constables for Serving Civil Process 5 

Constable to Post Warrants & Other Similar Work 5 

Director of Emergency Management 5 

Executive Secretary to the Board of Selectmen 5 

Fence Viewers 5 

Forest Warden 5 

Graves Officer 5 

Harbormaster 5 

Inspector of Buildings & Smoke 5 

Junior Custodian 5 

Keeper of the Lockup 5 

Parking Agent 5 

Senior Building Custodian 5 

Shellfish Constable 5 

Town Counsel 5 

Veterans' Service Agent 5 

Weights & Measures Inspector 5 

Wire Inspector 5 

Appointed by the Selectmen & Moderator 

Personnel Board 10 

Appointed by the Town Clerk & Collector 

Assistant Town Clerks 11 

Appointed by the Treasurer with Approval of the Board of Selectmen 

Assistant Treasurer 11 

Appointed or Elected by Organizations of the Employees Affected 

Group Insurance Advisory Committee 11 

196 



c 

Committees Appointed by Moderator 

Capital Improvement Study Committee 9 

Finance Committee 9 

Town Land Use Trustees 9 

Zoning Bylaw Review Committee 9 

Committees Appointed by the Selectmen 

ADA Oversight Committee 6 

Affirmative Action 6 

Appeals, Zoning Board of 6 

Conservation Commission 6 

Council on Aging 6 

Cultural Council 6 

Design Selection Committee 6 

Earth Removal Advisory Committee 6 

Election Commissioners, Board of 6 

Harbor Advisory Committee 6 

Historical Commission 6 

Insurance Advisory Committee 6 

Public Works, Board of 7 

Rails to Trails Committee 7 

Recreation Commission 7 

Revitalization Committee 7 

Safety/Security Committee 7 

Sailing Subcommittee 7 

Technology Committee 7 

Traffic Study Committee 7 

Veterans' Affairs Committee 7 

War Memorial Scholarship Fund Committee 7 

D 

Democratic Town Committee 13 

E 

Elected Officials 

Assessors, Board of 4 

Constables 4 

Health, Board of 4 

Housing Authority 4 

Moderator 4 

Planning Board 4 

Public Library 4 

Selectmen, Board of 4 

School Committee 4 

F 

For Your Convenience 195 

G 

General Information 3 

I 

In Memoriam 194 

R 

Reports 

Accounting Department I^O 

Assessors, Board of 115 

Clerk 18 



197 



Collector of Taxes 1 08 

Computer Analyst 120 

Conservation Commission 121 

Contributory Retirement Board 168 

Council on Aging 122 

; Earth Removal Advisory Committee 126 

\ Election Commissioners, Board of 129 

3 Electrical and Fire Alarm Inspector 131 

2 Emergency fvlanagement Agency 132 

^ Executive Secretary 17 

■1 Harbor Advisory Committee 133 

^ Harbormaster 1 34 

J Health, Board of 136 

Historical Commission 142 

^; Housing Authority 143 

Inspector of Weights & Measures 191 

7> MBTA Advisory Board 1 48 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 149 

North Shore Regional Vocational School District 151 

Personnel Board 158 

Planning Board 159 

Police Department 160 

Public Library 145 

Public Schools 170 

Public Works, Board of 166 

Recreation Commission 167 

Selectmen, Board of 15 

Town Counsel 125 

Traffic Study Committee 186 

Treasurer 109 

Veterans' Services 1 87 

War Memorial Scholarship Fund Committee 189 

Zoning Board of Appeals 118 

Representatives, Liaisons, Designees, Coordinators 8 

Clean Air & Oil Spill Coordinator 8 

Hazardous Waste Coordinator 8 

Labor Service Coordinator 8 

Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 8 

Mass. Bays Program — 2000 Representative 8 

Mass. Water Resources Authority 8 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 8 

National Organization on Disability Liaison & Handicap Coordinator 8 

North Shore Regional Vocational School District Representative 8 

National Organization on Disability Liaison & Handicap Coordinator 8 

North Shore Task Force 8 

Right to Know Law Coordinator 8 

Winter Planning Coordinator 8 

Republican Town Committee 14 

Retirees 192 

S 

Service to the Town 1 93 

U 

Union Presidents 11 

198 



II